On the subject of Data Warehouses, Data Cubes & OLAP…. - Xwindows

This is a discussion on On the subject of Data Warehouses, Data Cubes & OLAP…. - Xwindows ; On the subject of Data Warehouses, Data Cubes & OLAP…. I would like to speak frankly about Data Warehouses, Data Cubes and OLAP (on-line analytical processing). Has it dawned on anyone else that these buzz words were created by some ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: On the subject of Data Warehouses, Data Cubes & OLAP….

  1. On the subject of Data Warehouses, Data Cubes & OLAP….

    On the subject of Data Warehouses, Data Cubes & OLAP….

    I would like to speak frankly about Data Warehouses, Data Cubes and
    OLAP (on-line analytical processing). Has it dawned on anyone else
    that these buzz words were created by some geek who decided to take a
    stab at marketing? Knowing that to the backwoods manager who knows
    little of technology that new innovative names for old concepts would
    help to sale their products.

    I mean seriously, what is the story here? In a nut shell, and please
    stop me if you disagree, but isn’t a data warehouse simply a
    database? Can’t you do everything on a conventional database
    like SQL Server, Oracle or DB2 that you can do on these new
    proprietary Data Warehouse constructs? I mean who are they trying to
    fool?

    Take a look, for instance, at Data Cubes. Who hasn’t noticed
    the striking similarity between data cubes and views used in all the
    more robust databases? Also, what about OLAP? OLAP is nothing more
    than a report generator. There’s nothing you can do with these
    million dollar price tagged Data Warehouse total solution packages
    that I can’t do with SQL Server, Oracle or DB2…for that
    matter Microsoft Access.

    As an example some sales people for Metadata Corporation has the Vice
    President of I.T. in Nashville, for Healthspring, sold on their total
    solution data respository which is such a scam. All they had to do
    was throw a couple of buzzwords at him and they have him hypnotized.

    Personally, I feel that these kinds of marketing practices undermine
    our industry. It helps to unravel what little standards or
    consistency we have. What do you guys think?

    Stuart

  2. Re: On the subject of Data Warehouses, Data Cubes & OLAP….


    "Will" wrote in message
    news:4edac88f.0310140702.4baba2a7@posting.google.c om...
    > On the subject of Data Warehouses, Data Cubes & OLAP….
    >
    > I would like to speak frankly about Data Warehouses, Data Cubes and
    > OLAP (on-line analytical processing). Has it dawned on anyone else
    > that these buzz words were created by some geek who decided to take a
    > stab at marketing? Knowing that to the backwoods manager who knows
    > little of technology that new innovative names for old concepts would
    > help to sale their products.
    >
    > I mean seriously, what is the story here? In a nut shell, and please
    > stop me if you disagree, but isn’t a data warehouse simply a
    > database? Can’t you do everything on a conventional database
    > like SQL Server, Oracle or DB2 that you can do on these new
    > proprietary Data Warehouse constructs? I mean who are they trying to
    > fool?
    >
    > Take a look, for instance, at Data Cubes. Who hasn’t noticed
    > the striking similarity between data cubes and views used in all the
    > more robust databases? Also, what about OLAP? OLAP is nothing more
    > than a report generator. There’s nothing you can do with these
    > million dollar price tagged Data Warehouse total solution packages
    > that I can’t do with SQL Server, Oracle or DB2…for that
    > matter Microsoft Access.
    >
    > As an example some sales people for Metadata Corporation has the Vice
    > President of I.T. in Nashville, for Healthspring, sold on their total
    > solution data respository which is such a scam. All they had to do
    > was throw a couple of buzzwords at him and they have him hypnotized.
    >
    > Personally, I feel that these kinds of marketing practices undermine
    > our industry. It helps to unravel what little standards or
    > consistency we have. What do you guys think?
    >
    > Stuart


    Its just marketing. Its part of business. Get over it and stick to coding.



  3. Re: On the subject of Data Warehouses, Data Cubes & OLAP….

    Will wrote:

    > On the subject of Data Warehouses, Data Cubes & OLAP….
    >
    > I would like to speak frankly about Data Warehouses, Data Cubes and
    > OLAP (on-line analytical processing). Has it dawned on anyone else
    > that these buzz words were created by some geek who decided to take a
    > stab at marketing? Knowing that to the backwoods manager who knows
    > little of technology that new innovative names for old concepts would
    > help to sale their products.
    >
    > I mean seriously, what is the story here? In a nut shell, and please
    > stop me if you disagree, but isn’t a data warehouse simply a
    > database? Can’t you do everything on a conventional database
    > like SQL Server, Oracle or DB2 that you can do on these new
    > proprietary Data Warehouse constructs? I mean who are they trying to
    > fool?
    >
    > Take a look, for instance, at Data Cubes. Who hasn’t noticed
    > the striking similarity between data cubes and views used in all the
    > more robust databases? Also, what about OLAP? OLAP is nothing more
    > than a report generator. There’s nothing you can do with these
    > million dollar price tagged Data Warehouse total solution packages
    > that I can’t do with SQL Server, Oracle or DB2…for that
    > matter Microsoft Access.
    >
    > As an example some sales people for Metadata Corporation has the Vice
    > President of I.T. in Nashville, for Healthspring, sold on their total
    > solution data respository which is such a scam. All they had to do
    > was throw a couple of buzzwords at him and they have him hypnotized.
    >
    > Personally, I feel that these kinds of marketing practices undermine
    > our industry. It helps to unravel what little standards or
    > consistency we have. What do you guys think?
    >
    > Stuart

    Depending on the "solution" OLAP and data warehousing can either be snake
    oil or a heavy duty application.

    First lets look at OLAP, OLAP is not just a SQL query, it is basically two
    applications a MBA friendly interface to the data. MBAs are notoriously
    computer and technophobic. Just dealing with these chuckleheads gives me a
    headache.

    Second, and more difficultly, performance. One of the key issues of OLAP is
    to be able to perform complex data analysis in a reasonable amount of time.
    OLAP requires a lot of summary tables and data tricks to let an MBA with
    the attention span of a hyperactive mosquito to get their reports as
    nessisary.

    Data warehousing is different, it is an efficient way to store historical
    data so that it can be used when needed, but not nessisarily in the live
    transactional system. Think about "store" vs "warehouse."

    OLAP and data warehousing go together because it allows business types to
    analyze trends in an ad-hoc fashion quickly.

    Are they buzzwords? They sure are! Are they just a SQL database? They can
    be, but a good one is a lot of work and design.

  4. Re: On the subject of Data Warehouses, Data Cubes & OLAP….

    > So true OLAP looks much like traditional DB, but doing OLAP with
    > regular DB is a lot of head banging. Without the tools - If you get
    > the maths right probably most of the things will be so slow it will
    > take a lifetime to see results or the other way around.


    It is my experience OLAP is nothing more than a report generator using
    views. Anyone wants to argue with me? I've done everything you have
    mentioned with a great deal of success using SQL Server and Crystal
    Reports. Having created all the input to the reports using views and
    unions I've made some damn impressive reports. The views function
    identical to cubes. You might argue that this consumes resources
    because they are generated on the fly and could hamper traffic, but
    I've never experienced this. The perfect DW model in my humble
    opinion is snowflake/normalized on a SQL Server (robust) box.
    Attention to detail and elegant views yield a most powerful EIS.
    Arguments?

    The statistical calculations are easy to put together. More
    importantly...IT'S THE MOST FUN PART!!! CAN I GET AN AMEN?

    While I'm on my soapbox has anyone noticed the conceptual similarities
    of star/snowflake schema models and that of non-realational/relational
    or unmormalized/normalized schema models respectively??? GIVE ME A
    BREAK! Why does anyone CHOOSE to create new names for old concepts?
    I think they should be drug out into the street and shot! I CAN'T
    HEAR YOU CONGREGATION!

    Stu

+ Reply to Thread