Keybindings in terminals - How, when, where? - Xwindows

This is a discussion on Keybindings in terminals - How, when, where? - Xwindows ; (I'm cross-posting this to both newsgroups, since it's X-related, but is probably a typical newbie question that I'm just now getting around to) Can someone point me in the right direction to get a handle on when and how keybindings ...

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Thread: Keybindings in terminals - How, when, where?

  1. Keybindings in terminals - How, when, where?

    (I'm cross-posting this to both newsgroups, since it's X-related, but is
    probably a typical newbie question that I'm just now getting around to)

    Can someone point me in the right direction to get a handle on when and
    how keybindings get assigned and can be changed in terminal emulators?

    What's prompted my quest is trying to use KDE on Solaris... I've
    tried Konsole, xterm and dtterm, each with various combinations of
    configuration settings, stty settings (very little) and such. When I
    telnet or ssh from one host to another, and consequently change
    terminals, my key bindings go awry.* I don't know where what is getting
    set, and I strongly suspect on top of it all KDE is pulling some
    strings. Add to that what happens once in vi/vim and you get the
    picture.

    Empirical testing with various settings is getting me nowhere, so it's
    time to learn cause and effect. There are apparently so many ways that
    things can get altered that I can't really get a good footing until I
    learn a bit more. If I can get a handle on this, I can probably cut to
    the chase much more effectively.

    Does there exist somewhere a reasonably concise and clear explanation
    how all this basically works? That is, how key bindings get set for,
    say xterm, by the X server and can be later modified? Maybe a guide to
    common issues and how to fix them? Googling generates a lot of hits in
    general, but they're kinda scattered.

    * One particularly ... interesting ... change was when I telneted to our
    production backup server and discovered that via that connection, the
    Delete key actually functioned as Enter...! Imagine making a dumb
    typing mistake, cursoring over to fix it and hitting Delete. That
    behavior only happened while in Konsole, BTW.

    Maybe I can also apply my newfound knowledge to figure out why the End
    and Delete keys generate ~ in my Linux xterm at home, bit only as
    root... I guess that's bonus credit :-)

    Thanks for any guidance.

    --

    -- Len Philpot ><> --
    -- len@philpot.org http://philpot.org/ --
    -- lphilpot01@yahoo.com (alternate email) --

  2. Re: Keybindings in terminals - How, when, where?

    in message ,
    wrote Len Philpot ...

    > Can someone point me in the right direction to get a handle on
    > when and how keybindings get assigned and can be changed in
    > terminal emulators?


    Start w/ forming some background in n easy steps...

    - Start w/ noting the peculiarities of your often used terminal
    (emulator), the terminal that you use to access (things locally
    and the outside).

    - Move to xterm(1) if that is not first choice. See also...

    http://invisible-island.net/xterm/xterm.faq.html

    - Note the things about rest of the terminals.

    - Find out the effects of the remote access program, e.g. telnet,
    ssh, etc., on the terminal settings if any.

    - There quite possibly be curses related issues; different servers
    quite possibly have curses of varying capabilities.

    - The shell, and editing mode, you use may also affect the keyboard
    settings/mappings.

    ( That bash2 and ksh93 have different vi-editing mode key bindings
    should not be a surprise; the difference should be treated as a
    minor annoyance. This annoyance can be overcome either by
    adapting to/tolerating the differences or modifying the key
    bindings for your shell(s). )


    In all the terminal related cases, you should first look for
    terminfo(5) and/or termcap related issues/manuals. terminfo (on
    FreeBSD) describes the capabilities of a terminal: color, screen
    saving/restoration, etc.


    ....Well, that would be my general plan.


    - parv

    --
    In order to reach me, do away w/ WhereElse in the address.

    A programmer, budding Unix system administrator, and amateur photographer
    seeks employment: http://www103.pair.com/parv/work/

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