Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband - Wireless

This is a discussion on Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband - Wireless ; Hello all & thanks in advance for any advice. I live in an area of DE (USA), with no cable or DSL for internet access. I've just signed up for a 30-day trial period for Broadband wireless through Verizon Wireless. ...

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  1. Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    Hello all & thanks in advance for any advice.

    I live in an area of DE (USA), with no cable or DSL for internet access.
    I've just signed up for a 30-day trial period for Broadband wireless through
    Verizon Wireless. I've purchased a USB720 modem for access. We have 3
    computers, 1 laptop & 2 desktops that I'd like to be able to share this
    internet access (no more than 2 would be online at 1 time). The laptop is a
    1-yr old Dell currently running Media Edition 2005 & is located on the main
    floor of our home. One desktop is a 3-4 year old HP/Compaq running XP Home
    Edition, & it's located in an outbuilding (husband's cave), about 100' from
    my laptop. The 3rd PC, is a 5-yr old Dell located upstairs from the laptop
    running XP Pro (least likely to need internet access, I could always move USB
    modem to this PC if necessary).

    In speaking with the sales personnel at both Verizon Wireless & Circuit City
    yesterday, they both advised this is almost impossible to do, even for a
    person with extensive networking experience, but in reading some of the
    posts, it seems to be possible.

    For now, my questions are:

    Is this in fact possible?


    Does it matter which computer the USB 720 modem is attached to? Verizon
    Wireless advised that using the laptop as the internet source would "bog
    down" the laptop to the point it would be difficult to use (and he claimed to
    have a lot of networking experience).

    Do I just need a wireless router and cards for the desktop PCs? What about
    the PC in my husband's "cave"? Is there reasonably priced equipment that
    will effectively reach the 100' from my laptop to his PC (presuming we
    hook-up to my laptop).

    Is there additional equipment must I purchase & does brand matter? While
    cost is always a concern, since Comcast wants $12,000 to run 1 mile of cable
    from the nearest (3/10) mile current access, a wireless home network seems
    more cost effective. I'm also interested in connecting a Nintendo Wii through
    his internet connection, & from Nintendo, understand that a couple of Belkin
    wireless routers are not compatible.

    Thanks again



  2. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    Justpast40 wrote:
    > Hello all & thanks in advance for any advice.
    >
    > I live in an area of DE (USA), with no cable or DSL for internet access.
    > I've just signed up for a 30-day trial period for Broadband wireless through
    > Verizon Wireless. I've purchased a USB720 modem for access. We have 3
    > computers, 1 laptop & 2 desktops that I'd like to be able to share this
    > internet access (no more than 2 would be online at 1 time). The laptop is a
    > 1-yr old Dell currently running Media Edition 2005 & is located on the main
    > floor of our home. One desktop is a 3-4 year old HP/Compaq running XP Home
    > Edition, & it's located in an outbuilding (husband's cave), about 100' from
    > my laptop. The 3rd PC, is a 5-yr old Dell located upstairs from the laptop
    > running XP Pro (least likely to need internet access, I could always move USB
    > modem to this PC if necessary).
    >
    > In speaking with the sales personnel at both Verizon Wireless & Circuit City
    > yesterday, they both advised this is almost impossible to do, even for a
    > person with extensive networking experience, but in reading some of the
    > posts, it seems to be possible.
    >
    > For now, my questions are:
    >
    > Is this in fact possible?
    >
    >
    > Does it matter which computer the USB 720 modem is attached to? Verizon
    > Wireless advised that using the laptop as the internet source would "bog
    > down" the laptop to the point it would be difficult to use (and he claimed to
    > have a lot of networking experience).
    >
    > Do I just need a wireless router and cards for the desktop PCs? What about
    > the PC in my husband's "cave"? Is there reasonably priced equipment that
    > will effectively reach the 100' from my laptop to his PC (presuming we
    > hook-up to my laptop).
    >
    > Is there additional equipment must I purchase & does brand matter? While
    > cost is always a concern, since Comcast wants $12,000 to run 1 mile of cable
    > from the nearest (3/10) mile current access, a wireless home network seems
    > more cost effective. I'm also interested in connecting a Nintendo Wii through
    > his internet connection, & from Nintendo, understand that a couple of Belkin
    > wireless routers are not compatible.
    >
    > Thanks again
    >
    >


    Yes, you can set up a wireless network with this modem. It might even
    work to your husband's cave if you can get an unobstructed line of sight
    from a window in the main house to a window in the cave. It's not as
    difficult as it looks -- but print this out and study it for a while.
    If you have questions, just ask. www.linksys.com has some flash
    presentations ("learning center") that explain the basics of setting up
    networks.

    In the typical home network (wireless or wired), there is a modem
    (dial-up, DSL, cable, or, as in your case, EVDO broadband) that connects
    to the Internet. Ideally, you would then have a wired or wireless
    router (your choice) connected to the modem. All of your computers and
    other networkable devices connect to the router. Configured in this
    way, all of the computers can share the Internet connection and the
    computers can also be configured to share resources (files and
    printers). Moreover, only the router need be left powered on in order
    for any of the computers to access the Internet.

    Unfortunately, I do not know of any home router that connects to a modem
    using USB. Almost all routers expect to connect to the modem using an
    Ethernet cable (or, in the case of dial-up, perhaps by a serial
    connection). There are wireless routers that accept the PC-card style
    broadband modem, but none that I know of that will accept the USB type
    that you have.

    Therefore, what you will need to do is set up Windows Internet
    Connection Sharing (ICS) on one of your computers. This computer must
    be powered on and active (not in hibernation or sleep mode) when any of
    the other computers needs to access the Internet. You can use any of
    your computers for this, but you might want to use the upstairs Dell
    because otherwise you'll be connecting and disconnecting things from one
    of your laptops.

    While you're thinking about which computer to use, consider that to
    increase the possibility that the wireless signal will actually be
    usable in your husband's "cave," the wireless router (or at least its
    antenna) should be in front of a window facing the "cave" with no
    intervening obstructions (like trees). At the same time, the tiny
    antenna in your USB720 probably also will work best if it is higher up
    and near a window. (The USB720 does have a connection for an external
    antenna if that proves to be necessary.)

    Radio communication -- whether it's your broadband connection to Verizon
    or your local wireless network -- is highly dependent on the
    environment. You won't know how well things work (or if they do at all)
    until you try different locations.

    In addition to your USB720, you will need to buy a wireless router plus
    wireless adapters for all computers (except the one that's going to have
    the USB720). Your laptops may or may not have built-in wireless
    adapters already.

    The first step is to install the USB720 on your chosen computer and make
    sure that you have Internet access. This computer must have a USB
    connector (obviously) and an Ethernet network adapter.

    Once you're confident that the Internet connection is working, setup ICS
    on the network adapter. Here's a good tutorial:
    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/xp_ics/
    also: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306126/

    Now you have to have to create your wireless network. The devices
    called wireless routers typically are 3 devices in one box: a router,
    which translates addresses from one network (the Internet) to another
    network (your local network); a switch (most home routers have 4
    Ethernet jacks to which you can connect computers); and a wireless
    access point, which acts essentially as a wireless extension to the
    4-port switch.

    In your setup, Windows ICS is acting as the router, so you DO NOT want
    to use this function of your wireless router. In order to achieve this
    condition, you need to do 3 things to the router:

    1. When you connect the router to the ICS network adapter on your chosen
    computer, do NOT connect to the router's WAN or "Internet" jack.
    Instead, use one of the 4 "LAN" jacks.

    2. You will need to turn of the DHCP server in the router because ICS
    already provides this functionality. You can do this be accessing the
    router's configuration utility. The simplest way to do this is to
    connect one of your other laptops to one of the router's LAN jacks with
    an Ethernet cable and enter the router's default IP address in a web
    browser (IE or Firefox) as explained in the router's User Guide.

    3. All routers come set with a default IP address that is "seen" by
    computers connected to its LAN jacks and to its wireless system.
    Linksys routers, for example, are set to 192.168.1.0. D-Link is set to
    192.168.0.1. Other brands vary. Because the ICS network adapter is set
    (and can't be changed) to 192.168.0.1, you must change the default IP
    address of the router to 192.168.0.x (I suggest 192.168.0.10) with a
    "subnet mask" of 255.255.255.0. This change also can be made using the
    router's configuration utility. Write this new address down and tape it
    to the top of the router. You will need to use this address whenever
    you want to access the router's configuration utility.

    As far as picking hardware is concerned, I suggest a name brand:
    Linksys, D-Link, Buffalo, Netgear, etc. The least expensive versions
    are "plain" Wireless G. If you want to pay more for "range booster,"
    "turbo," "108" or similar devices, I suggest that you get all of the
    devices (router and adapters) from the same manufacturer and the same
    "family." There is a newer wifi standard, 802.11n. Although it has not
    been made an official standard yet, some people report good results
    anyway. In particular, Barb Bowman, a Windows MVP who writes articles
    for Microsoft on networking and often posts in this newsgroup, reports
    good results with the D-Link DIR-655. Again, if you pay extra for this
    router, be sure to also buy D-Link "Xtreme N" adapters for the other
    computers. If you just want to go with wireless G, the Buffalo
    WHR-HP-G54 has a built-in RF amplifier, which should help increase the
    likelihood that your network will extend to your husband's cave:
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833162134
    Buffalo also sells hi-gain antennas for use with its products. The
    WHR-HP-G54 is one of Buffalo's "125 high-speed" products, so if you get
    this router, get compatible adapters.




    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

  3. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    "Lem" wrote:

    > Justpast40 wrote:
    > > Hello all & thanks in advance for any advice.
    > >
    > > I live in an area of DE (USA), with no cable or DSL for internet access.
    > > I've just signed up for a 30-day trial period for Broadband wireless through
    > > Verizon Wireless. I've purchased a USB720 modem for access. We have 3
    > > computers, 1 laptop & 2 desktops that I'd like to be able to share this
    > > internet access (no more than 2 would be online at 1 time). The laptop is a
    > > 1-yr old Dell currently running Media Edition 2005 & is located on the main
    > > floor of our home. One desktop is a 3-4 year old HP/Compaq running XP Home
    > > Edition, & it's located in an outbuilding (husband's cave), about 100' from
    > > my laptop. The 3rd PC, is a 5-yr old Dell located upstairs from the laptop
    > > running XP Pro (least likely to need internet access, I could always move USB
    > > modem to this PC if necessary).
    > >
    > > In speaking with the sales personnel at both Verizon Wireless & Circuit City
    > > yesterday, they both advised this is almost impossible to do, even for a
    > > person with extensive networking experience, but in reading some of the
    > > posts, it seems to be possible.
    > >
    > > For now, my questions are:
    > >
    > > Is this in fact possible?
    > >
    > >
    > > Does it matter which computer the USB 720 modem is attached to? Verizon
    > > Wireless advised that using the laptop as the internet source would "bog
    > > down" the laptop to the point it would be difficult to use (and he claimed to
    > > have a lot of networking experience).
    > >
    > > Do I just need a wireless router and cards for the desktop PCs? What about
    > > the PC in my husband's "cave"? Is there reasonably priced equipment that
    > > will effectively reach the 100' from my laptop to his PC (presuming we
    > > hook-up to my laptop).
    > >
    > > Is there additional equipment must I purchase & does brand matter? While
    > > cost is always a concern, since Comcast wants $12,000 to run 1 mile of cable
    > > from the nearest (3/10) mile current access, a wireless home network seems
    > > more cost effective. I'm also interested in connecting a Nintendo Wii through
    > > his internet connection, & from Nintendo, understand that a couple of Belkin
    > > wireless routers are not compatible.
    > >
    > > Thanks again
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Yes, you can set up a wireless network with this modem. It might even
    > work to your husband's cave if you can get an unobstructed line of sight
    > from a window in the main house to a window in the cave. It's not as
    > difficult as it looks -- but print this out and study it for a while.
    > If you have questions, just ask. www.linksys.com has some flash
    > presentations ("learning center") that explain the basics of setting up
    > networks.
    >
    > In the typical home network (wireless or wired), there is a modem
    > (dial-up, DSL, cable, or, as in your case, EVDO broadband) that connects
    > to the Internet. Ideally, you would then have a wired or wireless
    > router (your choice) connected to the modem. All of your computers and
    > other networkable devices connect to the router. Configured in this
    > way, all of the computers can share the Internet connection and the
    > computers can also be configured to share resources (files and
    > printers). Moreover, only the router need be left powered on in order
    > for any of the computers to access the Internet.
    >
    > Unfortunately, I do not know of any home router that connects to a modem
    > using USB. Almost all routers expect to connect to the modem using an
    > Ethernet cable (or, in the case of dial-up, perhaps by a serial
    > connection). There are wireless routers that accept the PC-card style
    > broadband modem, but none that I know of that will accept the USB type
    > that you have.
    >
    > Therefore, what you will need to do is set up Windows Internet
    > Connection Sharing (ICS) on one of your computers. This computer must
    > be powered on and active (not in hibernation or sleep mode) when any of
    > the other computers needs to access the Internet. You can use any of
    > your computers for this, but you might want to use the upstairs Dell
    > because otherwise you'll be connecting and disconnecting things from one
    > of your laptops.
    >
    > While you're thinking about which computer to use, consider that to
    > increase the possibility that the wireless signal will actually be
    > usable in your husband's "cave," the wireless router (or at least its
    > antenna) should be in front of a window facing the "cave" with no
    > intervening obstructions (like trees). At the same time, the tiny
    > antenna in your USB720 probably also will work best if it is higher up
    > and near a window. (The USB720 does have a connection for an external
    > antenna if that proves to be necessary.)
    >
    > Radio communication -- whether it's your broadband connection to Verizon
    > or your local wireless network -- is highly dependent on the
    > environment. You won't know how well things work (or if they do at all)
    > until you try different locations.
    >
    > In addition to your USB720, you will need to buy a wireless router plus
    > wireless adapters for all computers (except the one that's going to have
    > the USB720). Your laptops may or may not have built-in wireless
    > adapters already.
    >
    > The first step is to install the USB720 on your chosen computer and make
    > sure that you have Internet access. This computer must have a USB
    > connector (obviously) and an Ethernet network adapter.
    >
    > Once you're confident that the Internet connection is working, setup ICS
    > on the network adapter. Here's a good tutorial:
    > http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/xp_ics/
    > also: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306126/
    >
    > Now you have to have to create your wireless network. The devices
    > called wireless routers typically are 3 devices in one box: a router,
    > which translates addresses from one network (the Internet) to another
    > network (your local network); a switch (most home routers have 4
    > Ethernet jacks to which you can connect computers); and a wireless
    > access point, which acts essentially as a wireless extension to the
    > 4-port switch.
    >
    > In your setup, Windows ICS is acting as the router, so you DO NOT want
    > to use this function of your wireless router. In order to achieve this
    > condition, you need to do 3 things to the router:
    >
    > 1. When you connect the router to the ICS network adapter on your chosen
    > computer, do NOT connect to the router's WAN or "Internet" jack.
    > Instead, use one of the 4 "LAN" jacks.
    >
    > 2. You will need to turn of the DHCP server in the router because ICS
    > already provides this functionality. You can do this be accessing the
    > router's configuration utility. The simplest way to do this is to
    > connect one of your other laptops to one of the router's LAN jacks with
    > an Ethernet cable and enter the router's default IP address in a web
    > browser (IE or Firefox) as explained in the router's User Guide.
    >
    > 3. All routers come set with a default IP address that is "seen" by
    > computers connected to its LAN jacks and to its wireless system.
    > Linksys routers, for example, are set to 192.168.1.0. D-Link is set to
    > 192.168.0.1. Other brands vary. Because the ICS network adapter is set
    > (and can't be changed) to 192.168.0.1, you must change the default IP
    > address of the router to 192.168.0.x (I suggest 192.168.0.10) with a
    > "subnet mask" of 255.255.255.0. This change also can be made using the
    > router's configuration utility. Write this new address down and tape it
    > to the top of the router. You will need to use this address whenever
    > you want to access the router's configuration utility.
    >
    > As far as picking hardware is concerned, I suggest a name brand:
    > Linksys, D-Link, Buffalo, Netgear, etc. The least expensive versions
    > are "plain" Wireless G. If you want to pay more for "range booster,"
    > "turbo," "108" or similar devices, I suggest that you get all of the
    > devices (router and adapters) from the same manufacturer and the same
    > "family." There is a newer wifi standard, 802.11n. Although it has not
    > been made an official standard yet, some people report good results
    > anyway. In particular, Barb Bowman, a Windows MVP who writes articles
    > for Microsoft on networking and often posts in this newsgroup, reports
    > good results with the D-Link DIR-655. Again, if you pay extra for this
    > router, be sure to also buy D-Link "Xtreme N" adapters for the other
    > computers. If you just want to go with wireless G, the Buffalo
    > WHR-HP-G54 has a built-in RF amplifier, which should help increase the
    > likelihood that your network will extend to your husband's cave:
    > http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833162134
    > Buffalo also sells hi-gain antennas for use with its products. The
    > WHR-HP-G54 is one of Buffalo's "125 high-speed" products, so if you get
    > this router, get compatible adapters.


    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >


    Lem, thanks so much for the detailed, easy to read explanation. I've
    printed it out, will study, & try the set-up tomorrow. The USB720 (which
    installed as a Novatel720) is currently connected to my laptop, & I do have
    internet, although the service could be stronger. I'll try an antenna if
    necessary. The upstairs Dell may actually have slightly better reception from
    Verizon Wireless, as it is also closer to a window vs. the laptop, which is
    in the middle of the house.

    On the way home from work today, I (stopped at the local Wally World - they
    don't have much) purchased a Linksys Wireless-G Broadband Router with
    SpeedBooster (WRT54GS) & 1 Linksys Compact Wireless-G USB Network Adapter
    with SpeedBooseter thinking that if I could use the upstairs Dell to connect
    to the USB720 & wireless router that the desktop PC in my husband's "cave"
    can use the Wireless-G USB Network Adapter, & my Dell laptop has a built-in
    wireless adapter. As I read your post, these may not work for the "cave",
    but if I can successfully set-up the wireless network & share the wireless
    broadband with the 2 inside computers & this equipment, then I'll at least
    know I can do the networking before I invest in the "range booster" or
    "turbo" devices you mentioned.

    I've found the following sites referencing a wireless router & USB modem:


    http://www.evdoinfo.com/content/view/1973/64/
    http://www.kyocera-wireless.com/kr1-...tech-specs.htm

    Even if this were to work, wouldn't I still have an issue of the distance
    between the wireless router & my husband's cave?

    Thanks again, & will try to post again tomorrow after attempting to set-up
    with your instruction & my equipment, reading additional references & the
    Linksys site info if necessary.



  4. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    Justpast40 wrote:
    > "Lem" wrote:
    >
    >> Justpast40 wrote:
    >>> Hello all & thanks in advance for any advice.
    >>>
    >>> I live in an area of DE (USA), with no cable or DSL for internet access.
    >>> I've just signed up for a 30-day trial period for Broadband wireless through
    >>> Verizon Wireless. I've purchased a USB720 modem for access. We have 3
    >>> computers, 1 laptop & 2 desktops that I'd like to be able to share this
    >>> internet access (no more than 2 would be online at 1 time). The laptop is a
    >>> 1-yr old Dell currently running Media Edition 2005 & is located on the main
    >>> floor of our home. One desktop is a 3-4 year old HP/Compaq running XP Home
    >>> Edition, & it's located in an outbuilding (husband's cave), about 100' from
    >>> my laptop. The 3rd PC, is a 5-yr old Dell located upstairs from the laptop
    >>> running XP Pro (least likely to need internet access, I could always move USB
    >>> modem to this PC if necessary).
    >>>
    >>> In speaking with the sales personnel at both Verizon Wireless & Circuit City
    >>> yesterday, they both advised this is almost impossible to do, even for a
    >>> person with extensive networking experience, but in reading some of the
    >>> posts, it seems to be possible.
    >>>
    >>> For now, my questions are:
    >>>
    >>> Is this in fact possible?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Does it matter which computer the USB 720 modem is attached to? Verizon
    >>> Wireless advised that using the laptop as the internet source would "bog
    >>> down" the laptop to the point it would be difficult to use (and he claimed to
    >>> have a lot of networking experience).
    >>>
    >>> Do I just need a wireless router and cards for the desktop PCs? What about
    >>> the PC in my husband's "cave"? Is there reasonably priced equipment that
    >>> will effectively reach the 100' from my laptop to his PC (presuming we
    >>> hook-up to my laptop).
    >>>
    >>> Is there additional equipment must I purchase & does brand matter? While
    >>> cost is always a concern, since Comcast wants $12,000 to run 1 mile of cable
    >>> from the nearest (3/10) mile current access, a wireless home network seems
    >>> more cost effective. I'm also interested in connecting a Nintendo Wii through
    >>> his internet connection, & from Nintendo, understand that a couple of Belkin
    >>> wireless routers are not compatible.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks again
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Yes, you can set up a wireless network with this modem. It might even
    >> work to your husband's cave if you can get an unobstructed line of sight
    >> from a window in the main house to a window in the cave. It's not as
    >> difficult as it looks -- but print this out and study it for a while.
    >> If you have questions, just ask. www.linksys.com has some flash
    >> presentations ("learning center") that explain the basics of setting up
    >> networks.
    >>
    >> In the typical home network (wireless or wired), there is a modem
    >> (dial-up, DSL, cable, or, as in your case, EVDO broadband) that connects
    >> to the Internet. Ideally, you would then have a wired or wireless
    >> router (your choice) connected to the modem. All of your computers and
    >> other networkable devices connect to the router. Configured in this
    >> way, all of the computers can share the Internet connection and the
    >> computers can also be configured to share resources (files and
    >> printers). Moreover, only the router need be left powered on in order
    >> for any of the computers to access the Internet.
    >>
    >> Unfortunately, I do not know of any home router that connects to a modem
    >> using USB. Almost all routers expect to connect to the modem using an
    >> Ethernet cable (or, in the case of dial-up, perhaps by a serial
    >> connection). There are wireless routers that accept the PC-card style
    >> broadband modem, but none that I know of that will accept the USB type
    >> that you have.
    >>
    >> Therefore, what you will need to do is set up Windows Internet
    >> Connection Sharing (ICS) on one of your computers. This computer must
    >> be powered on and active (not in hibernation or sleep mode) when any of
    >> the other computers needs to access the Internet. You can use any of
    >> your computers for this, but you might want to use the upstairs Dell
    >> because otherwise you'll be connecting and disconnecting things from one
    >> of your laptops.
    >>
    >> While you're thinking about which computer to use, consider that to
    >> increase the possibility that the wireless signal will actually be
    >> usable in your husband's "cave," the wireless router (or at least its
    >> antenna) should be in front of a window facing the "cave" with no
    >> intervening obstructions (like trees). At the same time, the tiny
    >> antenna in your USB720 probably also will work best if it is higher up
    >> and near a window. (The USB720 does have a connection for an external
    >> antenna if that proves to be necessary.)
    >>
    >> Radio communication -- whether it's your broadband connection to Verizon
    >> or your local wireless network -- is highly dependent on the
    >> environment. You won't know how well things work (or if they do at all)
    >> until you try different locations.
    >>
    >> In addition to your USB720, you will need to buy a wireless router plus
    >> wireless adapters for all computers (except the one that's going to have
    >> the USB720). Your laptops may or may not have built-in wireless
    >> adapters already.
    >>
    >> The first step is to install the USB720 on your chosen computer and make
    >> sure that you have Internet access. This computer must have a USB
    >> connector (obviously) and an Ethernet network adapter.
    >>
    >> Once you're confident that the Internet connection is working, setup ICS
    >> on the network adapter. Here's a good tutorial:
    >> http://www.practicallynetworked.com/sharing/xp_ics/
    >> also: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/306126/
    >>
    >> Now you have to have to create your wireless network. The devices
    >> called wireless routers typically are 3 devices in one box: a router,
    >> which translates addresses from one network (the Internet) to another
    >> network (your local network); a switch (most home routers have 4
    >> Ethernet jacks to which you can connect computers); and a wireless
    >> access point, which acts essentially as a wireless extension to the
    >> 4-port switch.
    >>
    >> In your setup, Windows ICS is acting as the router, so you DO NOT want
    >> to use this function of your wireless router. In order to achieve this
    >> condition, you need to do 3 things to the router:
    >>
    >> 1. When you connect the router to the ICS network adapter on your chosen
    >> computer, do NOT connect to the router's WAN or "Internet" jack.
    >> Instead, use one of the 4 "LAN" jacks.
    >>
    >> 2. You will need to turn of the DHCP server in the router because ICS
    >> already provides this functionality. You can do this be accessing the
    >> router's configuration utility. The simplest way to do this is to
    >> connect one of your other laptops to one of the router's LAN jacks with
    >> an Ethernet cable and enter the router's default IP address in a web
    >> browser (IE or Firefox) as explained in the router's User Guide.
    >>
    >> 3. All routers come set with a default IP address that is "seen" by
    >> computers connected to its LAN jacks and to its wireless system.
    >> Linksys routers, for example, are set to 192.168.1.0. D-Link is set to
    >> 192.168.0.1. Other brands vary. Because the ICS network adapter is set
    >> (and can't be changed) to 192.168.0.1, you must change the default IP
    >> address of the router to 192.168.0.x (I suggest 192.168.0.10) with a
    >> "subnet mask" of 255.255.255.0. This change also can be made using the
    >> router's configuration utility. Write this new address down and tape it
    >> to the top of the router. You will need to use this address whenever
    >> you want to access the router's configuration utility.
    >>
    >> As far as picking hardware is concerned, I suggest a name brand:
    >> Linksys, D-Link, Buffalo, Netgear, etc. The least expensive versions
    >> are "plain" Wireless G. If you want to pay more for "range booster,"
    >> "turbo," "108" or similar devices, I suggest that you get all of the
    >> devices (router and adapters) from the same manufacturer and the same
    >> "family." There is a newer wifi standard, 802.11n. Although it has not
    >> been made an official standard yet, some people report good results
    >> anyway. In particular, Barb Bowman, a Windows MVP who writes articles
    >> for Microsoft on networking and often posts in this newsgroup, reports
    >> good results with the D-Link DIR-655. Again, if you pay extra for this
    >> router, be sure to also buy D-Link "Xtreme N" adapters for the other
    >> computers. If you just want to go with wireless G, the Buffalo
    >> WHR-HP-G54 has a built-in RF amplifier, which should help increase the
    >> likelihood that your network will extend to your husband's cave:
    >> http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833162134
    >> Buffalo also sells hi-gain antennas for use with its products. The
    >> WHR-HP-G54 is one of Buffalo's "125 high-speed" products, so if you get
    >> this router, get compatible adapters.

    >
    >> --
    >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >>

    >
    > Lem, thanks so much for the detailed, easy to read explanation. I've
    > printed it out, will study, & try the set-up tomorrow. The USB720 (which
    > installed as a Novatel720) is currently connected to my laptop, & I do have
    > internet, although the service could be stronger. I'll try an antenna if
    > necessary. The upstairs Dell may actually have slightly better reception from
    > Verizon Wireless, as it is also closer to a window vs. the laptop, which is
    > in the middle of the house.
    >
    > On the way home from work today, I (stopped at the local Wally World - they
    > don't have much) purchased a Linksys Wireless-G Broadband Router with
    > SpeedBooster (WRT54GS) & 1 Linksys Compact Wireless-G USB Network Adapter
    > with SpeedBooseter thinking that if I could use the upstairs Dell to connect
    > to the USB720 & wireless router that the desktop PC in my husband's "cave"
    > can use the Wireless-G USB Network Adapter, & my Dell laptop has a built-in
    > wireless adapter. As I read your post, these may not work for the "cave",
    > but if I can successfully set-up the wireless network & share the wireless
    > broadband with the 2 inside computers & this equipment, then I'll at least
    > know I can do the networking before I invest in the "range booster" or
    > "turbo" devices you mentioned.
    >
    > I've found the following sites referencing a wireless router & USB modem:
    >
    >
    > http://www.evdoinfo.com/content/view/1973/64/
    > http://www.kyocera-wireless.com/kr1-...tech-specs.htm
    >
    > Even if this were to work, wouldn't I still have an issue of the distance
    > between the wireless router & my husband's cave?
    >
    > Thanks again, & will try to post again tomorrow after attempting to set-up
    > with your instruction & my equipment, reading additional references & the
    > Linksys site info if necessary.
    >
    >


    Good luck. The Linksys equipment ought to work well for you. If you
    run into difficulties, post back. Also, there is a very active Linksys
    user community at www.linksysinfo.org.

    Given that you have a husband, you probably do not have the usual male
    aversion to reading directions. Take a look at the Linksys User Guide.
    It's actually pretty understandable. If you understand what you are
    attempting to accomplish, you won't be as likely to get into
    difficulties by repeatedly running "wizards" -- which sometimes seem to
    have flunked out of Hogwarts.

    Set things up in stages. First get one computer working with the
    router, then the next. Do not configure any encryption or other
    security measures initially -- get things working first.

    Do change the SSID (network name) on the router from its default
    (Linksys) to something recognizably yours (but not your last name or
    address). You should also change the password used to access the
    configuration utility (default = admin). Do not disable SSID
    broadcasting (this sometimes is suggested as a security measure, but it
    offers very minimal security with the potential for problems).

    When you get around to configuring wireless encryption, use
    WPA2-Personal if available on ALL computers (it may not be available if
    your laptops are a few years old; or you might have to get a newer
    driver from the laptop mfr). If WPA2-Personal isn't available, use
    WPA-Personal. If given the choice between AES and TKIP, choose AES.
    Pick a reasonably long (8-20 character) passphrase. Ideally, don't use
    dictionary words, include some numbers and/or special characters, and
    vary the case. You do have to remember it though. Set up properly
    WinXP will remember your password and connect to your wireless network
    automatically.

    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

  5. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    "Lem" wrote:

    > >

    >
    > Good luck. The Linksys equipment ought to work well for you. If you
    > run into difficulties, post back. Also, there is a very active Linksys
    > user community at www.linksysinfo.org.
    >
    > Given that you have a husband, you probably do not have the usual male
    > aversion to reading directions. Take a look at the Linksys User Guide.
    > It's actually pretty understandable. If you understand what you are
    > attempting to accomplish, you won't be as likely to get into
    > difficulties by repeatedly running "wizards" -- which sometimes seem to
    > have flunked out of Hogwarts.
    >
    > Set things up in stages. First get one computer working with the
    > router, then the next. Do not configure any encryption or other
    > security measures initially -- get things working first.
    >
    > Do change the SSID (network name) on the router from its default
    > (Linksys) to something recognizably yours (but not your last name or
    > address). You should also change the password used to access the
    > configuration utility (default = admin). Do not disable SSID
    > broadcasting (this sometimes is suggested as a security measure, but it
    > offers very minimal security with the potential for problems).
    >
    > When you get around to configuring wireless encryption, use
    > WPA2-Personal if available on ALL computers (it may not be available if
    > your laptops are a few years old; or you might have to get a newer
    > driver from the laptop mfr). If WPA2-Personal isn't available, use
    > WPA-Personal. If given the choice between AES and TKIP, choose AES.
    > Pick a reasonably long (8-20 character) passphrase. Ideally, don't use
    > dictionary words, include some numbers and/or special characters, and
    > vary the case. You do have to remember it though. Set up properly
    > WinXP will remember your password and connect to your wireless network
    > automatically.
    >
    > --
    > Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >



    I’ve cut my initial question & your initial response because of the length.

    ……….I love a computer tech with a sense of humor – I do read instructions.
    …I’m stuck! I’ve been working on this for the better part of the day. I can’t
    get the laptop to share the internet connection, & right now, it is sitting
    next to the upstairs Dell & both are connected to the router with network
    cables (the router lights 1 & 2 are a steady green, so I presume that means
    OK)

    I have the USB modem working on the upstairs Dell, although the signal
    strength is the same as when connected to the laptop when in the middle of
    the house yesterday before I changed connections, the speed seems to have
    increased from when it was attached to the laptop. Under Network Connections
    the USB modem it is showing as connected & shared, so I presume I got the ICS
    for this correct, but maybe not, because I can’t get the laptop online.

    On the upstairs Dell with the USB modem & router, the Internet Gateway is
    showing as disabled, which I would think is correct since this is the
    connection; it’s not connecting from another PC. Under LAN, the Local Area
    Connection is showing as enabled. When using the Linksys automatic set-up it
    could not detect the router but since the Power, LAN, & 1st & 2nd lights
    (Upstairs Dell with USB modem & laptop attached with network cables to 1st &
    2nd router ports), are all green I presume both PCs recognize router.)

    I think I followed the instructions in your 1st post.

    I changed the router’s address, & disabled the DHCP. I think I followed the
    instructions in the Microsoft link you provided for using ICS for both the
    host & client computers. I presume the client computer at this point is the
    laptop I’m trying to connect, but is not connecting (will try to connect to
    the cave after getting laptop connected).

    The laptop has options for both a wireless & wired connection.

    Where do I go from here?

    Is it possible that a prior dial-up connection setting or attempt to set up
    the network before I posted when I tried to connect a Belkin router (found to
    be not compatible with the Nintendo Wii) with USB modem to the laptop are
    interfering with the laptop now connecting to the network?

    Thanks again.


  6. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    Justpast40 wrote:
    > "Lem" wrote:
    >
    >> Good luck. The Linksys equipment ought to work well for you. If you
    >> run into difficulties, post back. Also, there is a very active Linksys
    >> user community at www.linksysinfo.org.
    >>
    >> Given that you have a husband, you probably do not have the usual male
    >> aversion to reading directions. Take a look at the Linksys User Guide.
    >> It's actually pretty understandable. If you understand what you are
    >> attempting to accomplish, you won't be as likely to get into
    >> difficulties by repeatedly running "wizards" -- which sometimes seem to
    >> have flunked out of Hogwarts.
    >>
    >> Set things up in stages. First get one computer working with the
    >> router, then the next. Do not configure any encryption or other
    >> security measures initially -- get things working first.
    >>
    >> Do change the SSID (network name) on the router from its default
    >> (Linksys) to something recognizably yours (but not your last name or
    >> address). You should also change the password used to access the
    >> configuration utility (default = admin). Do not disable SSID
    >> broadcasting (this sometimes is suggested as a security measure, but it
    >> offers very minimal security with the potential for problems).
    >>
    >> When you get around to configuring wireless encryption, use
    >> WPA2-Personal if available on ALL computers (it may not be available if
    >> your laptops are a few years old; or you might have to get a newer
    >> driver from the laptop mfr). If WPA2-Personal isn't available, use
    >> WPA-Personal. If given the choice between AES and TKIP, choose AES.
    >> Pick a reasonably long (8-20 character) passphrase. Ideally, don't use
    >> dictionary words, include some numbers and/or special characters, and
    >> vary the case. You do have to remember it though. Set up properly
    >> WinXP will remember your password and connect to your wireless network
    >> automatically.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >>

    >
    >
    > I’ve cut my initial question & your initial response because of the length.
    >
    > ……….I love a computer tech with a sense of humor – I do read instructions.
    > …I’m stuck! I’ve been working on this for the better part of the day. I can’t
    > get the laptop to share the internet connection, & right now, it is sitting
    > next to the upstairs Dell & both are connected to the router with network
    > cables (the router lights 1 & 2 are a steady green, so I presume that means
    > OK)
    >
    > I have the USB modem working on the upstairs Dell, although the signal
    > strength is the same as when connected to the laptop when in the middle of
    > the house yesterday before I changed connections, the speed seems to have
    > increased from when it was attached to the laptop. Under Network Connections
    > the USB modem it is showing as connected & shared, so I presume I got the ICS
    > for this correct, but maybe not, because I can’t get the laptop online.
    >
    > On the upstairs Dell with the USB modem & router, the Internet Gateway is
    > showing as disabled, which I would think is correct since this is the
    > connection; it’s not connecting from another PC. Under LAN, the Local Area
    > Connection is showing as enabled. When using the Linksys automatic set-up it
    > could not detect the router but since the Power, LAN, & 1st & 2nd lights
    > (Upstairs Dell with USB modem & laptop attached with network cables to 1st &
    > 2nd router ports), are all green I presume both PCs recognize router.)
    >
    > I think I followed the instructions in your 1st post.
    >
    > I changed the router’s address, & disabled the DHCP. I think I followed the
    > instructions in the Microsoft link you provided for using ICS for both the
    > host & client computers. I presume the client computer at this point is the
    > laptop I’m trying to connect, but is not connecting (will try to connect to
    > the cave after getting laptop connected).
    >
    > The laptop has options for both a wireless & wired connection.
    >
    > Where do I go from here?
    >
    > Is it possible that a prior dial-up connection setting or attempt to set up
    > the network before I posted when I tried to connect a Belkin router (found to
    > be not compatible with the Nintendo Wii) with USB modem to the laptop are
    > interfering with the laptop now connecting to the network?
    >
    > Thanks again.
    >


    I'm not sure why "Internet Gateway" is shown as disabled. Most likely,
    Windows is detecting the presence of the router (which IS the
    "Internet Gateway" in the typical configuration of modem <--> router
    <--> computer) but since your router is not connected to the Internet,
    it is showing as disabled. What happens if you right click on the
    "Internet Gateway" icon and select enable?

    Aside from that, open a Command Prompt window first on the Dell and then
    on the laptop [Start > All Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt]. On
    the Dell, do this while you are in fact connected to the Internet.

    In the window that opens type:

    ipconfig /all > c:\myconfig.txt

    Then press Enter.

    Open the file C:\myconfig.txt using Notepad and copy/paste the results
    in your next post. You can delete the file after you paste the info.
    Be sure to identify which info goes with which computer.

    I haven't used an EVDO or similar broadband connection myself. When you
    connected from the Dell, did you have to enter a userid and password, as
    if it was a dial-up modem? If so, did you check the box to "Establish a
    dial-up connection whenever a computer on my network attempts to access
    the Internet"?

    Your output should look something like this:
    Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
    (C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.

    Windows IP Configuration

    Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : able
    Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
    Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Unknown
    IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

    Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

    Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) PRO/100 Network
    Connection
    Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-07-E9-ED-0C-47
    Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
    Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
    IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.100
    Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
    Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 207.69.188.186
    207.69.188.185
    Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, September 11, 2007
    7:33:15PM
    Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Wednesday, September 12,
    2007 7:33:15 PM


    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

  7. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband


    "Lem" wrote:

    > Justpast40 wrote:
    > > "Lem" wrote:
    > >
    > >> Good luck. The Linksys equipment ought to work well for you. If you
    > >> run into difficulties, post back. Also, there is a very active Linksys
    > >> user community at www.linksysinfo.org.
    > >>
    > >> Given that you have a husband, you probably do not have the usual male
    > >> aversion to reading directions. Take a look at the Linksys User Guide.
    > >> It's actually pretty understandable. If you understand what you are
    > >> attempting to accomplish, you won't be as likely to get into
    > >> difficulties by repeatedly running "wizards" -- which sometimes seem to
    > >> have flunked out of Hogwarts.
    > >>
    > >> Set things up in stages. First get one computer working with the
    > >> router, then the next. Do not configure any encryption or other
    > >> security measures initially -- get things working first.
    > >>
    > >> Do change the SSID (network name) on the router from its default
    > >> (Linksys) to something recognizably yours (but not your last name or
    > >> address). You should also change the password used to access the
    > >> configuration utility (default = admin). Do not disable SSID
    > >> broadcasting (this sometimes is suggested as a security measure, but it
    > >> offers very minimal security with the potential for problems).
    > >>
    > >> When you get around to configuring wireless encryption, use
    > >> WPA2-Personal if available on ALL computers (it may not be available if
    > >> your laptops are a few years old; or you might have to get a newer
    > >> driver from the laptop mfr). If WPA2-Personal isn't available, use
    > >> WPA-Personal. If given the choice between AES and TKIP, choose AES.
    > >> Pick a reasonably long (8-20 character) passphrase. Ideally, don't use
    > >> dictionary words, include some numbers and/or special characters, and
    > >> vary the case. You do have to remember it though. Set up properly
    > >> WinXP will remember your password and connect to your wireless network
    > >> automatically.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    > >>
    > >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > I’ve cut my initial question & your initial response because of the length.
    > >
    > > ……….I love a computer tech with a sense of humor – I do read instructions.
    > > …I’m stuck! I’ve been working on this for the better part of the day. I can’t
    > > get the laptop to share the internet connection, & right now, it is sitting
    > > next to the upstairs Dell & both are connected to the router with network
    > > cables (the router lights 1 & 2 are a steady green, so I presume that means
    > > OK)
    > >
    > > I have the USB modem working on the upstairs Dell, although the signal
    > > strength is the same as when connected to the laptop when in the middle of
    > > the house yesterday before I changed connections, the speed seems to have
    > > increased from when it was attached to the laptop. Under Network Connections
    > > the USB modem it is showing as connected & shared, so I presume I got the ICS
    > > for this correct, but maybe not, because I can’t get the laptop online.
    > >
    > > On the upstairs Dell with the USB modem & router, the Internet Gateway is
    > > showing as disabled, which I would think is correct since this is the
    > > connection; it’s not connecting from another PC. Under LAN, the Local Area
    > > Connection is showing as enabled. When using the Linksys automatic set-up it
    > > could not detect the router but since the Power, LAN, & 1st & 2nd lights
    > > (Upstairs Dell with USB modem & laptop attached with network cables to 1st &
    > > 2nd router ports), are all green I presume both PCs recognize router.)
    > >
    > > I think I followed the instructions in your 1st post.
    > >
    > > I changed the router’s address, & disabled the DHCP. I think I followed the
    > > instructions in the Microsoft link you provided for using ICS for both the
    > > host & client computers. I presume the client computer at this point is the
    > > laptop I’m trying to connect, but is not connecting (will try to connect to
    > > the cave after getting laptop connected).
    > >
    > > The laptop has options for both a wireless & wired connection.
    > >
    > > Where do I go from here?
    > >
    > > Is it possible that a prior dial-up connection setting or attempt to set up
    > > the network before I posted when I tried to connect a Belkin router (found to
    > > be not compatible with the Nintendo Wii) with USB modem to the laptop are
    > > interfering with the laptop now connecting to the network?
    > >
    > > Thanks again.
    > >

    >
    > I'm not sure why "Internet Gateway" is shown as disabled. Most likely,
    > Windows is detecting the presence of the router (which IS the
    > "Internet Gateway" in the typical configuration of modem <--> router
    > <--> computer) but since your router is not connected to the Internet,
    > it is showing as disabled. What happens if you right click on the
    > "Internet Gateway" icon and select enable?
    >
    > Aside from that, open a Command Prompt window first on the Dell and then
    > on the laptop [Start > All Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt]. On
    > the Dell, do this while you are in fact connected to the Internet.
    >
    > In the window that opens type:
    >
    > ipconfig /all > c:\myconfig.txt
    >
    > Then press Enter.
    >
    > Open the file C:\myconfig.txt using Notepad and copy/paste the results
    > in your next post. You can delete the file after you paste the info.
    > Be sure to identify which info goes with which computer.
    >
    > I haven't used an EVDO or similar broadband connection myself. When you
    > connected from the Dell, did you have to enter a userid and password, as
    > if it was a dial-up modem? If so, did you check the box to "Establish a
    > dial-up connection whenever a computer on my network attempts to access
    > the Internet"?
    >
    > Your output should look something like this:
    > Microsoft Windows XP [Version 5.1.2600]
    > (C) Copyright 1985-2001 Microsoft Corp.
    >
    > Windows IP Configuration
    >
    > Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : able
    > Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
    > Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Unknown
    > IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    > WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    >
    > Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
    >
    > Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    > Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) PRO/100 Network
    > Connection
    > Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-07-E9-ED-0C-47
    > Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
    > Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
    > IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.100
    > Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
    > Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    > DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    > DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 207.69.188.186
    > 207.69.188.185
    > Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, September 11, 2007
    > 7:33:15PM
    > Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Wednesday, September 12,
    > 2007 7:33:15 PM
    >
    >
    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer



    When I try to enable “Internet Gateway" it attempts to connect & says
    “connection failed” (after which I could not load web page without D/C modem
    connection & reconnecting).

    When I initially used USB modem on both the laptop (yesterday), & the
    upstairs Dell today, I did not need to enter any username or password info,
    but at 1 time today, I say a popup for it on the upstairs Dell with a default
    username as the phone # @vzw3g.com. All I’ve done on the laptop is try to
    open IE or Netscape.

    Command prompt from upstairs Dell connected to internet & router:

    Windows IP Configuration

    Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : Upstairs
    Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
    Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
    IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : Yes
    WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

    Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

    Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    Description . . . . . . . . . . . : GVC-REALTEK Ethernet 10/100 PCI
    Adapter
    Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-C0-A8-80-91-14
    Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
    Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
    IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.100
    Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
    Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, September 11, 2007
    7:15:24 PM
    Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Wednesday, September 12, 2007
    7:15:24 PM

    PPP adapter NationalAccess - BroadbandAccess:

    Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    Description . . . . . . . . . . . : WAN (PPP/SLIP) Interface
    Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-53-45-00-00-00
    Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
    IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 75.196.92.140
    Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
    Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 75.196.92.140
    DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 66.174.95.44
    69.78.96.14

    NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled

    There is no text file on the C directory of the laptop when entering the
    command into the prompt.

    >


  8. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband


    > When I try to enable “Internet Gateway" it attempts to connect & says
    > “connection failed” (after which I could not load web page without D/C modem
    > connection & reconnecting).
    >
    > When I initially used USB modem on both the laptop (yesterday), & the
    > upstairs Dell today, I did not need to enter any username or password info,
    > but at 1 time today, I say a popup for it on the upstairs Dell with a default
    > username as the phone # @vzw3g.com. All I’ve done on the laptop is try to
    > open IE or Netscape.
    >
    > Command prompt from upstairs Dell connected to internet & router:
    >
    > Windows IP Configuration
    >
    > Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : Upstairs
    > Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
    > Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
    > IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : Yes
    > WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    >
    > Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
    >
    > Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    > Description . . . . . . . . . . . : GVC-REALTEK Ethernet 10/100 PCI
    > Adapter
    > Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-C0-A8-80-91-14
    > Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
    > Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
    > IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.100
    > Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
    > Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    > DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    > DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    > Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, September 11, 2007
    > 7:15:24 PM
    > Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Wednesday, September 12, 2007
    > 7:15:24 PM
    >
    > PPP adapter NationalAccess - BroadbandAccess:
    >
    > Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    > Description . . . . . . . . . . . : WAN (PPP/SLIP) Interface
    > Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-53-45-00-00-00
    > Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
    > IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 75.196.92.140
    > Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
    > Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 75.196.92.140
    > DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 66.174.95.44
    > 69.78.96.14
    >
    > NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled
    >
    > There is no text file on the C directory of the laptop when entering the
    > command into the prompt.
    >
    > >



    Need to clarify sentence that says “All I’ve done on the laptop is try to
    open IE or Netscape.”

    I mean today after connecting USB modem & router to upstairs Dell.

    Tried to open browsers on laptop after wiring router to upstairs Dell & then
    laptop.

    If USB modem is connected to laptop it works (no router info if modem &
    router connected to laptop B4 trying to connect Upstairs Dell)

  9. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    After reading a post on Linksys, I restarted the upstairs Dell with the
    attached router & USB modem & repaired both the wireless & wired adapters on
    the laptop. They both attempted to obtain IP addresses, but wireless failed.
    The wired connection has an error message of limited or no connectivity that
    I did not have before. The laptop runs Media Edition 2005 & must have
    recognized some sort of internet connection because for the 1st time since
    I’ve been trying to do this, the Media Guide which is set to download (TV)
    guide information whenever it detects an internet presence attempted to
    download the Guide, but failed.

    After the above, I ran the ipconfig, & whereas last night I had no file on
    the C directory (presume no IP address), after repairing both network
    connections I got the following file on the laptop.



    Windows IP Configuration

    Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : MyNotebook
    Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
    Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
    IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No

    Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

    Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Broadcom 440x 10/100 Integrated
    Controller
    Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-14-22-99-86-EC
    Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
    Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
    Autoconfiguration IP Address. . . : 169.254.125.64
    Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0
    Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 169.254.125.64

    Ethernet adapter Wireless Network Connection:

    Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
    Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel(R) PRO/Wireless 2915ABG
    Network Connection
    Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-16-6F-6E-91-4C



  10. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    Justpast40 wrote:

    >
    > When I try to enable “Internet Gateway" it attempts to connect & says
    > “connection failed” (after which I could not load web page without D/C modem
    > connection & reconnecting).
    >
    > When I initially used USB modem on both the laptop (yesterday), & the
    > upstairs Dell today, I did not need to enter any username or password info,
    > but at 1 time today, I say a popup for it on the upstairs Dell with a default
    > username as the phone # @vzw3g.com. All I’ve done on the laptop is try to
    > open IE or Netscape.
    >
    > Command prompt from upstairs Dell connected to internet & router:
    >
    > Windows IP Configuration
    >
    > Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : Upstairs
    > Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
    > Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
    > IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : Yes
    > WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    >
    > Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
    >
    > Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    > Description . . . . . . . . . . . : GVC-REALTEK Ethernet 10/100 PCI
    > Adapter
    > Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-C0-A8-80-91-14
    > Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
    > Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
    > IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.100
    > Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
    > Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    > DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    > DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    > Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, September 11, 2007
    > 7:15:24 PM
    > Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Wednesday, September 12, 2007
    > 7:15:24 PM
    >
    > PPP adapter NationalAccess - BroadbandAccess:
    >
    > Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    > Description . . . . . . . . . . . : WAN (PPP/SLIP) Interface
    > Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-53-45-00-00-00
    > Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
    > IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 75.196.92.140
    > Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
    > Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 75.196.92.140
    > DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 66.174.95.44
    > 69.78.96.14
    >
    > NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled
    >
    > There is no text file on the C directory of the laptop when entering the
    > command into the prompt.
    >


    I know that you said that you had enabled ICS and disabled the router's
    DHCP server, but the settings on your "upstairs" network adapter (the
    GVC-Realtek) are what I would expect to see if ICS was NOT enabled and
    the router's DHCP server WAS enabled. Also, it looks as if the router's
    default IP address was not changed. Perhaps you didn't click the "Save
    Settings" button after making changes in the router's configuration
    screens.

    On the other hand, looking at the info for your laptop, you may have
    successfully turned off the router's DHCP server but didn't change the
    router's IP address.

    First, check the router. Disconnect the router from upstairs, leaving
    only a cable from your laptop to the router connected.

    Open IE or Firefox and in the address box enter 192.168.1.1 and press
    enter (or click GO).

    Do you get the login screen for the router?

    If yes, then at least some of the changes you made didn't get saved
    after you made them. On the Basic Setup screen, make sure that the
    "Local IP Address" (just above the radio buttons for enabling/disabling
    the DHCP server) is set to 192.168.0.x (x can be 2 through 254). Make
    sure the DHCP Server is disabled. Click the "Save Settings" button at
    the bottom of the screen.

    If no, then enter the IP address you selected for the router, enter the
    router's configuration utility, and make sure that the DHCP server is
    disabled.

    Now check ICS on upstairs.

    Leave the router disconnected from upstairs. Reboot the computer.

    In Network Connections, right-click on the icon for your Local Area
    Connection, select Properties, click the Advanced tab, and make sure
    that the "firewall" box is UNchecked. Go to the General tab, select
    Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click Properties. Confirm that the radio
    button for Obtain an IP Address automatically is selected and click the
    Advanced button. Click the WINS tab. Select the radio button to Enable
    NetBIOS over TCP/IP. OK your way out.

    If the icon for your USB720 indicates that it is shared, disable sharing
    by going to the properties, advanced tab, and unchecking the box, OK
    your way out.

    Now we'll re-enable sharing. Step through the procedure for enabling ICS
    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...rverdialup.htm

    The icon you want to right-click on to share is the one for your USB720.

    On the Properties | Advanced tab, check the boxes to enable the
    firewall, to allow other users to connect through this connection, and
    to allow other users to control or disable the shared connection. If
    there is a box to establish a dial-up connection whenever a network
    computer attempts to connect, check that also.

    If there is a drop-down box to select a home network connection, make
    sure you select Ethernet connection.

    Click OK. Answer Yes if you see this:
    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...roadband06.gif

    Open a Command Prompt window and type
    ipconfig /all
    and press Enter (this is the same as what you did before except that the
    output will only go to the screen and not to a file). In the data for
    the GVC-Realtek adapter, the IP address should be 192.168.0.1.

    If you have a different IP address, please post it.

    If the IP address of the network adapter IS 192.168.0.1, you have
    successfully configured upstairs to use ICS. Connect the router to
    upstairs and to the laptop, reboot the laptop and see if you can now
    access the Internet from the laptop.

    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

  11. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband



    "Lem" wrote:

    > Justpast40 wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > When I try to enable “Internet Gateway" it attempts to connect & says
    > > “connection failed” (after which I could not load web page without D/C modem
    > > connection & reconnecting).
    > >
    > > When I initially used USB modem on both the laptop (yesterday), & the
    > > upstairs Dell today, I did not need to enter any username or password info,
    > > but at 1 time today, I say a popup for it on the upstairs Dell with a default
    > > username as the phone # @vzw3g.com. All I’ve done on the laptop is try to
    > > open IE or Netscape.
    > >
    > > Command prompt from upstairs Dell connected to internet & router:
    > >
    > > Windows IP Configuration
    > >
    > > Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : Upstairs
    > > Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
    > > Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
    > > IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : Yes
    > > WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    > >
    > > Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
    > >
    > > Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    > > Description . . . . . . . . . . . : GVC-REALTEK Ethernet 10/100 PCI
    > > Adapter
    > > Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-C0-A8-80-91-14
    > > Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
    > > Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
    > > IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.100
    > > Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
    > > Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    > > DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    > > DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    > > Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, September 11, 2007
    > > 7:15:24 PM
    > > Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Wednesday, September 12, 2007
    > > 7:15:24 PM
    > >
    > > PPP adapter NationalAccess - BroadbandAccess:
    > >
    > > Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    > > Description . . . . . . . . . . . : WAN (PPP/SLIP) Interface
    > > Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-53-45-00-00-00
    > > Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
    > > IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 75.196.92.140
    > > Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
    > > Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 75.196.92.140
    > > DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 66.174.95.44
    > > 69.78.96.14
    > >
    > > NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled
    > >
    > > There is no text file on the C directory of the laptop when entering the
    > > command into the prompt.
    > >

    >
    > I know that you said that you had enabled ICS and disabled the router's
    > DHCP server, but the settings on your "upstairs" network adapter (the
    > GVC-Realtek) are what I would expect to see if ICS was NOT enabled and
    > the router's DHCP server WAS enabled. Also, it looks as if the router's
    > default IP address was not changed. Perhaps you didn't click the "Save
    > Settings" button after making changes in the router's configuration
    > screens.
    >
    > On the other hand, looking at the info for your laptop, you may have
    > successfully turned off the router's DHCP server but didn't change the
    > router's IP address.
    >
    > First, check the router. Disconnect the router from upstairs, leaving
    > only a cable from your laptop to the router connected.
    >
    > Open IE or Firefox and in the address box enter 192.168.1.1 and press
    > enter (or click GO).
    >
    > Do you get the login screen for the router?
    >
    > If yes, then at least some of the changes you made didn't get saved
    > after you made them. On the Basic Setup screen, make sure that the
    > "Local IP Address" (just above the radio buttons for enabling/disabling
    > the DHCP server) is set to 192.168.0.x (x can be 2 through 254). Make
    > sure the DHCP Server is disabled. Click the "Save Settings" button at
    > the bottom of the screen.
    >
    > If no, then enter the IP address you selected for the router, enter the
    > router's configuration utility, and make sure that the DHCP server is
    > disabled.
    >
    > Now check ICS on upstairs.
    >
    > Leave the router disconnected from upstairs. Reboot the computer.
    >
    > In Network Connections, right-click on the icon for your Local Area
    > Connection, select Properties, click the Advanced tab, and make sure
    > that the "firewall" box is UNchecked. Go to the General tab, select
    > Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click Properties. Confirm that the radio
    > button for Obtain an IP Address automatically is selected and click the
    > Advanced button. Click the WINS tab. Select the radio button to Enable
    > NetBIOS over TCP/IP. OK your way out.
    >
    > If the icon for your USB720 indicates that it is shared, disable sharing
    > by going to the properties, advanced tab, and unchecking the box, OK
    > your way out.
    >
    > Now we'll re-enable sharing. Step through the procedure for enabling ICS
    > http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...rverdialup.htm
    >
    > The icon you want to right-click on to share is the one for your USB720.
    >
    > On the Properties | Advanced tab, check the boxes to enable the
    > firewall, to allow other users to connect through this connection, and
    > to allow other users to control or disable the shared connection. If
    > there is a box to establish a dial-up connection whenever a network
    > computer attempts to connect, check that also.
    >
    > If there is a drop-down box to select a home network connection, make
    > sure you select Ethernet connection.
    >
    > Click OK. Answer Yes if you see this:
    > http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...roadband06.gif
    >
    > Open a Command Prompt window and type
    > ipconfig /all
    > and press Enter (this is the same as what you did before except that the
    > output will only go to the screen and not to a file). In the data for
    > the GVC-Realtek adapter, the IP address should be 192.168.0.1.
    >
    > If you have a different IP address, please post it.
    >
    > If the IP address of the network adapter IS 192.168.0.1, you have
    > successfully configured upstairs to use ICS. Connect the router to
    > upstairs and to the laptop, reboot the laptop and see if you can now
    > access the Internet from the laptop.
    >
    > --
    > Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >


    H E L P !

    I’m at the step where I should be able to re-enable the sharing on the USB
    modem, however when I click the advanced tab, the option to enable ICS that
    was there yesterday is not there now. The box does not have the middle
    section for ICS where the boxes to check was located.

    The only thing appearing under the advanced tab is the top part with the
    Internet Connection Firewall with a box to be checked and a link to learn
    more about Internet Connection Firewall. At the bottom of the tab is a link
    for the Network Setup Wizard, but the middle where the ICS option should be
    is empty. All of the ICS shown on the link you provided are not present on
    the tab (they were there yesterday)


  12. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    Justpast40 wrote:
    >
    > "Lem" wrote:
    >
    >> Justpast40 wrote:
    >>
    >>> When I try to enable “Internet Gateway" it attempts to connect & says
    >>> “connection failed” (after which I could not load web page without D/C modem
    >>> connection & reconnecting).
    >>>
    >>> When I initially used USB modem on both the laptop (yesterday), & the
    >>> upstairs Dell today, I did not need to enter any username or password info,
    >>> but at 1 time today, I say a popup for it on the upstairs Dell with a default
    >>> username as the phone # @vzw3g.com. All I’ve done on the laptop is try to
    >>> open IE or Netscape.
    >>>
    >>> Command prompt from upstairs Dell connected to internet & router:
    >>>
    >>> Windows IP Configuration
    >>>
    >>> Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : Upstairs
    >>> Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
    >>> Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
    >>> IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : Yes
    >>> WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
    >>>
    >>> Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:
    >>>
    >>> Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    >>> Description . . . . . . . . . . . : GVC-REALTEK Ethernet 10/100 PCI
    >>> Adapter
    >>> Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-C0-A8-80-91-14
    >>> Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
    >>> Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
    >>> IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.100
    >>> Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
    >>> Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    >>> DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    >>> DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.1
    >>> Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, September 11, 2007
    >>> 7:15:24 PM
    >>> Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Wednesday, September 12, 2007
    >>> 7:15:24 PM
    >>>
    >>> PPP adapter NationalAccess - BroadbandAccess:
    >>>
    >>> Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
    >>> Description . . . . . . . . . . . : WAN (PPP/SLIP) Interface
    >>> Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-53-45-00-00-00
    >>> Dhcp Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
    >>> IP Address. . . . . . . . . . . . : 75.196.92.140
    >>> Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.255
    >>> Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 75.196.92.140
    >>> DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : 66.174.95.44
    >>> 69.78.96.14
    >>>
    >>> NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled
    >>>
    >>> There is no text file on the C directory of the laptop when entering the
    >>> command into the prompt.
    >>>

    >> I know that you said that you had enabled ICS and disabled the router's
    >> DHCP server, but the settings on your "upstairs" network adapter (the
    >> GVC-Realtek) are what I would expect to see if ICS was NOT enabled and
    >> the router's DHCP server WAS enabled. Also, it looks as if the router's
    >> default IP address was not changed. Perhaps you didn't click the "Save
    >> Settings" button after making changes in the router's configuration
    >> screens.
    >>
    >> On the other hand, looking at the info for your laptop, you may have
    >> successfully turned off the router's DHCP server but didn't change the
    >> router's IP address.
    >>
    >> First, check the router. Disconnect the router from upstairs, leaving
    >> only a cable from your laptop to the router connected.
    >>
    >> Open IE or Firefox and in the address box enter 192.168.1.1 and press
    >> enter (or click GO).
    >>
    >> Do you get the login screen for the router?
    >>
    >> If yes, then at least some of the changes you made didn't get saved
    >> after you made them. On the Basic Setup screen, make sure that the
    >> "Local IP Address" (just above the radio buttons for enabling/disabling
    >> the DHCP server) is set to 192.168.0.x (x can be 2 through 254). Make
    >> sure the DHCP Server is disabled. Click the "Save Settings" button at
    >> the bottom of the screen.
    >>
    >> If no, then enter the IP address you selected for the router, enter the
    >> router's configuration utility, and make sure that the DHCP server is
    >> disabled.
    >>
    >> Now check ICS on upstairs.
    >>
    >> Leave the router disconnected from upstairs. Reboot the computer.
    >>
    >> In Network Connections, right-click on the icon for your Local Area
    >> Connection, select Properties, click the Advanced tab, and make sure
    >> that the "firewall" box is UNchecked. Go to the General tab, select
    >> Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click Properties. Confirm that the radio
    >> button for Obtain an IP Address automatically is selected and click the
    >> Advanced button. Click the WINS tab. Select the radio button to Enable
    >> NetBIOS over TCP/IP. OK your way out.
    >>
    >> If the icon for your USB720 indicates that it is shared, disable sharing
    >> by going to the properties, advanced tab, and unchecking the box, OK
    >> your way out.
    >>
    >> Now we'll re-enable sharing. Step through the procedure for enabling ICS
    >> http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...rverdialup.htm
    >>
    >> The icon you want to right-click on to share is the one for your USB720.
    >>
    >> On the Properties | Advanced tab, check the boxes to enable the
    >> firewall, to allow other users to connect through this connection, and
    >> to allow other users to control or disable the shared connection. If
    >> there is a box to establish a dial-up connection whenever a network
    >> computer attempts to connect, check that also.
    >>
    >> If there is a drop-down box to select a home network connection, make
    >> sure you select Ethernet connection.
    >>
    >> Click OK. Answer Yes if you see this:
    >> http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...roadband06.gif
    >>
    >> Open a Command Prompt window and type
    >> ipconfig /all
    >> and press Enter (this is the same as what you did before except that the
    >> output will only go to the screen and not to a file). In the data for
    >> the GVC-Realtek adapter, the IP address should be 192.168.0.1.
    >>
    >> If you have a different IP address, please post it.
    >>
    >> If the IP address of the network adapter IS 192.168.0.1, you have
    >> successfully configured upstairs to use ICS. Connect the router to
    >> upstairs and to the laptop, reboot the laptop and see if you can now
    >> access the Internet from the laptop.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >>

    >
    > H E L P !
    >
    > I’m at the step where I should be able to re-enable the sharing on the USB
    > modem, however when I click the advanced tab, the option to enable ICS that
    > was there yesterday is not there now. The box does not have the middle
    > section for ICS where the boxes to check was located.
    >
    > The only thing appearing under the advanced tab is the top part with the
    > Internet Connection Firewall with a box to be checked and a link to learn
    > more about Internet Connection Firewall. At the bottom of the tab is a link
    > for the Network Setup Wizard, but the middle where the ICS option should be
    > is empty. All of the ICS shown on the link you provided are not present on
    > the tab (they were there yesterday)
    >


    Oops!

    That's the sort of "Advanced" tab you normally get on just a stand-alone
    Local Area Connection. If you click the link for the Network Setup
    Wizard, do you get the screen with the 3 options for how the computer
    connects to the Internet?
    http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...erverwiz01.gif

    As I said before, I haven't set up a system using wireless broadband.
    In theory, it should work like all other Internet connections, but
    perhaps, because it's technology that was developed after ICS was
    designed, ICS doesn't realize that your USB720 is actually an Internet
    connection that can be shared unless it's actually active, connected to
    the Internet, when you try to share it. Try connecting to the Internet
    and then see if the ICS boxes show up.

    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

  13. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    > >> I know that you said that you had enabled ICS and disabled the router's
    > >> DHCP server, but the settings on your "upstairs" network adapter (the
    > >> GVC-Realtek) are what I would expect to see if ICS was NOT enabled and
    > >> the router's DHCP server WAS enabled. Also, it looks as if the router's
    > >> default IP address was not changed. Perhaps you didn't click the "Save
    > >> Settings" button after making changes in the router's configuration
    > >> screens.
    > >>
    > >> On the other hand, looking at the info for your laptop, you may have
    > >> successfully turned off the router's DHCP server but didn't change the
    > >> router's IP address.
    > >>
    > >> First, check the router. Disconnect the router from upstairs, leaving
    > >> only a cable from your laptop to the router connected.
    > >>
    > >> Open IE or Firefox and in the address box enter 192.168.1.1 and press
    > >> enter (or click GO).
    > >>
    > >> Do you get the login screen for the router?
    > >>
    > >> If yes, then at least some of the changes you made didn't get saved
    > >> after you made them. On the Basic Setup screen, make sure that the
    > >> "Local IP Address" (just above the radio buttons for enabling/disabling
    > >> the DHCP server) is set to 192.168.0.x (x can be 2 through 254). Make
    > >> sure the DHCP Server is disabled. Click the "Save Settings" button at
    > >> the bottom of the screen.
    > >>
    > >> If no, then enter the IP address you selected for the router, enter the
    > >> router's configuration utility, and make sure that the DHCP server is
    > >> disabled.
    > >>
    > >> Now check ICS on upstairs.
    > >>
    > >> Leave the router disconnected from upstairs. Reboot the computer.
    > >>
    > >> In Network Connections, right-click on the icon for your Local Area
    > >> Connection, select Properties, click the Advanced tab, and make sure
    > >> that the "firewall" box is UNchecked. Go to the General tab, select
    > >> Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click Properties. Confirm that the radio
    > >> button for Obtain an IP Address automatically is selected and click the
    > >> Advanced button. Click the WINS tab. Select the radio button to Enable
    > >> NetBIOS over TCP/IP. OK your way out.
    > >>
    > >> If the icon for your USB720 indicates that it is shared, disable sharing
    > >> by going to the properties, advanced tab, and unchecking the box, OK
    > >> your way out.
    > >>
    > >> Now we'll re-enable sharing. Step through the procedure for enabling ICS
    > >> http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...rverdialup.htm
    > >>
    > >> The icon you want to right-click on to share is the one for your USB720.
    > >>
    > >> On the Properties | Advanced tab, check the boxes to enable the
    > >> firewall, to allow other users to connect through this connection, and
    > >> to allow other users to control or disable the shared connection. If
    > >> there is a box to establish a dial-up connection whenever a network
    > >> computer attempts to connect, check that also.
    > >>
    > >> If there is a drop-down box to select a home network connection, make
    > >> sure you select Ethernet connection.
    > >>
    > >> Click OK. Answer Yes if you see this:
    > >> http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...roadband06.gif
    > >>
    > >> Open a Command Prompt window and type
    > >> ipconfig /all
    > >> and press Enter (this is the same as what you did before except that the
    > >> output will only go to the screen and not to a file). In the data for
    > >> the GVC-Realtek adapter, the IP address should be 192.168.0.1.
    > >>
    > >> If you have a different IP address, please post it.
    > >>
    > >> If the IP address of the network adapter IS 192.168.0.1, you have
    > >> successfully configured upstairs to use ICS. Connect the router to
    > >> upstairs and to the laptop, reboot the laptop and see if you can now
    > >> access the Internet from the laptop.
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    > >>
    > >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    > >>

    > >
    > > H E L P !
    > >
    > > I’m at the step where I should be able to re-enable the sharing on the USB
    > > modem, however when I click the advanced tab, the option to enable ICS that
    > > was there yesterday is not there now. The box does not have the middle
    > > section for ICS where the boxes to check was located.
    > >
    > > The only thing appearing under the advanced tab is the top part with the
    > > Internet Connection Firewall with a box to be checked and a link to learn
    > > more about Internet Connection Firewall. At the bottom of the tab is a link
    > > for the Network Setup Wizard, but the middle where the ICS option should be
    > > is empty. All of the ICS shown on the link you provided are not present on
    > > the tab (they were there yesterday)
    > >

    >
    > Oops!
    >
    > That's the sort of "Advanced" tab you normally get on just a stand-alone
    > Local Area Connection. If you click the link for the Network Setup
    > Wizard, do you get the screen with the 3 options for how the computer
    > connects to the Internet?
    > http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...erverwiz01.gif
    >
    > As I said before, I haven't set up a system using wireless broadband.
    > In theory, it should work like all other Internet connections, but
    > perhaps, because it's technology that was developed after ICS was
    > designed, ICS doesn't realize that your USB720 is actually an Internet
    > connection that can be shared unless it's actually active, connected to
    > the Internet, when you try to share it. Try connecting to the Internet
    > and then see if the ICS boxes show up.
    >
    > --
    > Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >




    I appreciate all your help!

    I got the ICS back after several system restores, but now when I try to
    connect the way I did, I get a pop-up "box" with dial-up name & password.
    Name is phone # @vzw3g.com, & password shows with stars & save already
    checked. I did not input any of this, so I have no idea what where it came
    from. Rather than proceed with that intenet connection, & have it saved, I'm
    signed on with the laptop where I did not get that pop-up. Could I have
    inadvertently changed something that created this pop-up since it is not on
    laptop but is in other PC, however not occurring earlier today or last
    night? The "prompt for name and password, certificate, etc", using the
    Options tab on the modems properties in Network Connections is not checked.

    I re-enabled ICS & firewall on modem on upstairs, but when I use ipconfig
    /all, it shows no IP address for network adapter.



  14. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    Justpast40 wrote:

    > I appreciate all your help!
    >
    > I got the ICS back after several system restores, but now when I try to
    > connect the way I did, I get a pop-up "box" with dial-up name & password.
    > Name is phone # @vzw3g.com, & password shows with stars & save already
    > checked. I did not input any of this, so I have no idea what where it came
    > from. Rather than proceed with that intenet connection, & have it saved, I'm
    > signed on with the laptop where I did not get that pop-up. Could I have
    > inadvertently changed something that created this pop-up since it is not on
    > laptop but is in other PC, however not occurring earlier today or last
    > night? The "prompt for name and password, certificate, etc", using the
    > Options tab on the modems properties in Network Connections is not checked.
    >
    > I re-enabled ICS & firewall on modem on upstairs, but when I use ipconfig
    > /all, it shows no IP address for network adapter.
    >
    >


    The "phone # @vzw3g.com" and corresponding password must have been
    entered by whatever "wizard" you used to install the software for the
    USB720, unless it's stored internally on the USB720, which would be very
    odd. That phone number and password also should appear somewhere in the
    documentation you got from Verizon when you subscribed to the service.

    Yes, you must have changed some setting that causes the log-in screen to
    appear. Don't worry about it for now. Go ahead and connect on the
    Dell. If you haven't found your username and password in your
    documentation, and are uneasy about storing the settings, just uncheck
    the "save username and password" box.

    Before we try to figure out what's going on with the upstairs Dell, did
    you do the check of the router configuration I suggested in the last
    post? I'll repeat it here so you don't have to scroll up and down:

    First, check the router configuration. Disconnect the router from
    upstairs, leaving only a cable from your laptop to the router connected.
    Disconnect the USB720 from the laptop.

    Open IE or Firefox and in the address box enter 192.168.1.1 and press
    enter (or click GO).

    Do you get the login screen for the router?

    If yes, then at least some of the changes you made didn't get saved
    after you made them. On the Basic Setup screen, make sure that the
    "Local IP Address" (just above the radio buttons for enabling/disabling
    the DHCP server) is set to 192.168.0.x (x can be 2 through 254). Make
    sure the DHCP Server is disabled. Click the "Save Settings" button at
    the bottom of the screen.

    If no, then enter the IP address you selected for the router, enter the
    router's configuration utility, and make sure that the DHCP server is
    disabled.

    Now let's try to figure out what's happening on the upstairs Dell.

    Plug in the USB720. Connect a cable from upstairs to the router. Boot.

    Open Device Manager (Start > Run then type "devmgmt.msc" without quotes
    and click OK).

    Scroll down until you see "Network Adapters" and click the + to expand
    this entry. If there are any devices with a yellow exclamation point
    (see http://www.ezlan.net/network/GhostNIC.jpg) right click them and
    choose uninstall.

    You should have an entry for your GVC-REALTEK Ethernet 10/100 PCI
    Adapter. Right-click, select Properties, and make sure that the
    drop-down box at the bottom of the General tab says "Enable (use this
    device)." OK your way out. If the only entry for this adapter was one
    with an exclamation point (and you removed it), re-boot the computer.
    Windows should detect the hardware and install the appropriate driver.

    What else (if anything) is listed under Network Adapters?

    Now open Network Connections. Please list the icons that you see. You
    should see at least a Local Area Connection icon. I would also expect
    you to see an icon for the USB720 and perhaps an icon for Internet Gateway.

    In the left column of Network Connections, under Network Tasks, the
    bottom panel should say "Details." As you click on each icon, the
    "Details" panel will change accordingly. Please post the details for
    each icon.

    I'm sorry this is so tedious, but since I can't see your computer, we
    have to do this back-and-forth stuff.


    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

  15. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband



    "Justpast40" wrote:

    > > >> I know that you said that you had enabled ICS and disabled the router's
    > > >> DHCP server, but the settings on your "upstairs" network adapter (the
    > > >> GVC-Realtek) are what I would expect to see if ICS was NOT enabled and
    > > >> the router's DHCP server WAS enabled. Also, it looks as if the router's
    > > >> default IP address was not changed. Perhaps you didn't click the "Save
    > > >> Settings" button after making changes in the router's configuration
    > > >> screens.
    > > >>
    > > >> On the other hand, looking at the info for your laptop, you may have
    > > >> successfully turned off the router's DHCP server but didn't change the
    > > >> router's IP address.
    > > >>
    > > >> First, check the router. Disconnect the router from upstairs, leaving
    > > >> only a cable from your laptop to the router connected.
    > > >>
    > > >> Open IE or Firefox and in the address box enter 192.168.1.1 and press
    > > >> enter (or click GO).
    > > >>
    > > >> Do you get the login screen for the router?
    > > >>
    > > >> If yes, then at least some of the changes you made didn't get saved
    > > >> after you made them. On the Basic Setup screen, make sure that the
    > > >> "Local IP Address" (just above the radio buttons for enabling/disabling
    > > >> the DHCP server) is set to 192.168.0.x (x can be 2 through 254). Make
    > > >> sure the DHCP Server is disabled. Click the "Save Settings" button at
    > > >> the bottom of the screen.
    > > >>
    > > >> If no, then enter the IP address you selected for the router, enter the
    > > >> router's configuration utility, and make sure that the DHCP server is
    > > >> disabled.
    > > >>
    > > >> Now check ICS on upstairs.
    > > >>
    > > >> Leave the router disconnected from upstairs. Reboot the computer.
    > > >>
    > > >> In Network Connections, right-click on the icon for your Local Area
    > > >> Connection, select Properties, click the Advanced tab, and make sure
    > > >> that the "firewall" box is UNchecked. Go to the General tab, select
    > > >> Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click Properties. Confirm that the radio
    > > >> button for Obtain an IP Address automatically is selected and click the
    > > >> Advanced button. Click the WINS tab. Select the radio button to Enable
    > > >> NetBIOS over TCP/IP. OK your way out.
    > > >>
    > > >> If the icon for your USB720 indicates that it is shared, disable sharing
    > > >> by going to the properties, advanced tab, and unchecking the box, OK
    > > >> your way out.
    > > >>
    > > >> Now we'll re-enable sharing. Step through the procedure for enabling ICS
    > > >> http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...rverdialup.htm
    > > >>
    > > >> The icon you want to right-click on to share is the one for your USB720.
    > > >>
    > > >> On the Properties | Advanced tab, check the boxes to enable the
    > > >> firewall, to allow other users to connect through this connection, and
    > > >> to allow other users to control or disable the shared connection. If
    > > >> there is a box to establish a dial-up connection whenever a network
    > > >> computer attempts to connect, check that also.
    > > >>
    > > >> If there is a drop-down box to select a home network connection, make
    > > >> sure you select Ethernet connection.
    > > >>
    > > >> Click OK. Answer Yes if you see this:
    > > >> http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...roadband06.gif
    > > >>
    > > >> Open a Command Prompt window and type
    > > >> ipconfig /all
    > > >> and press Enter (this is the same as what you did before except that the
    > > >> output will only go to the screen and not to a file). In the data for
    > > >> the GVC-Realtek adapter, the IP address should be 192.168.0.1.
    > > >>
    > > >> If you have a different IP address, please post it.
    > > >>
    > > >> If the IP address of the network adapter IS 192.168.0.1, you have
    > > >> successfully configured upstairs to use ICS. Connect the router to
    > > >> upstairs and to the laptop, reboot the laptop and see if you can now
    > > >> access the Internet from the laptop.
    > > >>
    > > >> --
    > > >> Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    > > >>
    > > >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > > >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    > > >>
    > > >
    > > > H E L P !
    > > >
    > > > I’m at the step where I should be able to re-enable the sharing on the USB
    > > > modem, however when I click the advanced tab, the option to enable ICS that
    > > > was there yesterday is not there now. The box does not have the middle
    > > > section for ICS where the boxes to check was located.
    > > >
    > > > The only thing appearing under the advanced tab is the top part with the
    > > > Internet Connection Firewall with a box to be checked and a link to learn
    > > > more about Internet Connection Firewall. At the bottom of the tab is a link
    > > > for the Network Setup Wizard, but the middle where the ICS option should be
    > > > is empty. All of the ICS shown on the link you provided are not present on
    > > > the tab (they were there yesterday)
    > > >

    > >
    > > Oops!
    > >
    > > That's the sort of "Advanced" tab you normally get on just a stand-alone
    > > Local Area Connection. If you click the link for the Network Setup
    > > Wizard, do you get the screen with the 3 options for how the computer
    > > connects to the Internet?
    > > http://www.practicallynetworked.com/...erverwiz01.gif
    > >
    > > As I said before, I haven't set up a system using wireless broadband.
    > > In theory, it should work like all other Internet connections, but
    > > perhaps, because it's technology that was developed after ICS was
    > > designed, ICS doesn't realize that your USB720 is actually an Internet
    > > connection that can be shared unless it's actually active, connected to
    > > the Internet, when you try to share it. Try connecting to the Internet
    > > and then see if the ICS boxes show up.
    > >
    > > --
    > > Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    > >
    > > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    > I appreciate all your help!
    >
    > I got the ICS back after several system restores, but now when I try to
    > connect the way I did, I get a pop-up "box" with dial-up name & password.
    > Name is phone # @vzw3g.com, & password shows with stars & save already
    > checked. I did not input any of this, so I have no idea what where it came
    > from. Rather than proceed with that intenet connection, & have it saved, I'm
    > signed on with the laptop where I did not get that pop-up. Could I have
    > inadvertently changed something that created this pop-up since it is not on
    > laptop but is in other PC, however not occurring earlier today or last
    > night? The "prompt for name and password, certificate, etc", using the
    > Options tab on the modems properties in Network Connections is not checked.
    >
    > I re-enabled ICS & firewall on modem on upstairs, but when I use ipconfig
    > /all, it shows no IP address for network adapter.
    >
    >


    Ok I think we have part of it. Although the ipconfig /all gave no IP
    address, I wired the router to the upstairs Dell while waiting for a rto
    above eply, & low & behold when I ran the command again I had an IP address
    on the upstairs adapter as 192.168.0.1

    I managed to disable the USB modem’s prompt for name & password through its
    menu, although that is not where the change occurred that created the prompt
    because the laptop & desktop PC now have different menu settings for
    connecting the USB modem directly to either PC.

    Now I need to get the laptop’s wireless card to work with the router & USB
    modem attached to the upstairs Dell. The wired laptop adapter is working
    because I can open both IE & Netscape, & it automatically updated my Quicken
    accounts when connected.

    What do I need to do to connect the laptop’s wireless adapter to the
    network? I tried telling it to repair with the wired connection
    disconnected. Under the wireless adapter’s TCP/IP, obtain address
    automatically is bulleted. I’ve rebooted the laptop 2 or 3 times.

    Thanks again for all your help.

    BTW on the upstairs Dell, the Internet Gateway is still showing as disabled,
    but if the laptop is wired to the router the internet is shared.


  16. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    "Lem" wrote:

    > Justpast40 wrote:
    >
    > > I appreciate all your help!
    > >
    > > I got the ICS back after several system restores, but now when I try to
    > > connect the way I did, I get a pop-up "box" with dial-up name & password.
    > > Name is phone # @vzw3g.com, & password shows with stars & save already
    > > checked. I did not input any of this, so I have no idea what where it came
    > > from. Rather than proceed with that intenet connection, & have it saved, I'm
    > > signed on with the laptop where I did not get that pop-up. Could I have
    > > inadvertently changed something that created this pop-up since it is not on
    > > laptop but is in other PC, however not occurring earlier today or last
    > > night? The "prompt for name and password, certificate, etc", using the
    > > Options tab on the modems properties in Network Connections is not checked.
    > >
    > > I re-enabled ICS & firewall on modem on upstairs, but when I use ipconfig
    > > /all, it shows no IP address for network adapter.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > The "phone # @vzw3g.com" and corresponding password must have been
    > entered by whatever "wizard" you used to install the software for the
    > USB720, unless it's stored internally on the USB720, which would be very
    > odd. That phone number and password also should appear somewhere in the
    > documentation you got from Verizon when you subscribed to the service.
    >
    > Yes, you must have changed some setting that causes the log-in screen to
    > appear. Don't worry about it for now. Go ahead and connect on the
    > Dell. If you haven't found your username and password in your
    > documentation, and are uneasy about storing the settings, just uncheck
    > the "save username and password" box.
    >
    > Before we try to figure out what's going on with the upstairs Dell, did
    > you do the check of the router configuration I suggested in the last
    > post? I'll repeat it here so you don't have to scroll up and down:
    >
    > First, check the router configuration. Disconnect the router from
    > upstairs, leaving only a cable from your laptop to the router connected.
    > Disconnect the USB720 from the laptop.
    >
    > Open IE or Firefox and in the address box enter 192.168.1.1 and press
    > enter (or click GO).
    >
    > Do you get the login screen for the router?
    >
    > If yes, then at least some of the changes you made didn't get saved
    > after you made them. On the Basic Setup screen, make sure that the
    > "Local IP Address" (just above the radio buttons for enabling/disabling
    > the DHCP server) is set to 192.168.0.x (x can be 2 through 254). Make
    > sure the DHCP Server is disabled. Click the "Save Settings" button at
    > the bottom of the screen.
    >
    > If no, then enter the IP address you selected for the router, enter the
    > router's configuration utility, and make sure that the DHCP server is
    > disabled.
    >
    > Now let's try to figure out what's happening on the upstairs Dell.
    >
    > Plug in the USB720. Connect a cable from upstairs to the router. Boot.
    >
    > Open Device Manager (Start > Run then type "devmgmt.msc" without quotes
    > and click OK).
    >
    > Scroll down until you see "Network Adapters" and click the + to expand
    > this entry. If there are any devices with a yellow exclamation point
    > (see http://www.ezlan.net/network/GhostNIC.jpg) right click them and
    > choose uninstall.
    >
    > You should have an entry for your GVC-REALTEK Ethernet 10/100 PCI
    > Adapter. Right-click, select Properties, and make sure that the
    > drop-down box at the bottom of the General tab says "Enable (use this
    > device)." OK your way out. If the only entry for this adapter was one
    > with an exclamation point (and you removed it), re-boot the computer.
    > Windows should detect the hardware and install the appropriate driver.
    >
    > What else (if anything) is listed under Network Adapters?
    >
    > Now open Network Connections. Please list the icons that you see. You
    > should see at least a Local Area Connection icon. I would also expect
    > you to see an icon for the USB720 and perhaps an icon for Internet Gateway.
    >
    > In the left column of Network Connections, under Network Tasks, the
    > bottom panel should say "Details." As you click on each icon, the
    > "Details" panel will change accordingly. Please post the details for
    > each icon.
    >
    > I'm sorry this is so tedious, but since I can't see your computer, we
    > have to do this back-and-forth stuff.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >



    I did follow your instructions before I used the system restore to fix the
    ICS on the upstairs Dell. Sorry if I missed part of that in my posts.

    I followed your directions in the order provided except when I got to the
    end & did not get an IP address for the upstairs Dell with ipconfig /all. (it
    showed no IP address); at that time I connected the router to the upstairs
    Dell, & the laptop then accessed the internet (as I just did with the
    Nintendo Wii downstairs which is picking up the wireless connection).

    I’d started with accessing the router through the laptop wired to the router
    with the upstairs Dell disconnected from the router, changed the address, &
    disabled the DHCP.

    I’m confused at the part where you say let’s, now let's try to figure out
    what's happening on the upstairs Dell, because except for the window to
    prompt for user name & password from USB mode, which I disabled though the
    Verizon menu, I thought the upstairs Dell was OK since it is sharing the
    internet with the laptop if the laptop is wired. It’s the laptop’s wireless
    that I can’t connect (although as I just found, the Nintendo Wii downstairs
    accessed the wireless signal to connect to the internet.) Doesn’t that mean
    I’m having a problem with the laptop’s wireless adapter acquiring an address
    vs. the upstairs Dell assigning one?

    To get both computers to share the internet I kept the laptop wired to the
    router, shared the ICS on the upstairs Dell with the USB modem attached to
    the upstairs Dell. (they are both Dells). If both the laptop & upstairs
    Dell are wired to the router the internet is shared from the upstairs Dell.

    Sorry if I misread your post, but I don’t understand why if the upstairs
    Dell is sharing the internet with the laptop (if wired) & the Nintendo Wii
    that I need to look at the adapter on the upstairs Dell, I would think I need
    to be on the laptop. Sorry if I’m wrong with this.

    I have both PC’s wired to the router.

    Under Device Manager on the laptop:

    Neither the Broadcom 440x nor the Intel Pro/wireless 2915ABG Network
    connection have an exclamation point, & both show as enabled.

    The only other adapter on the laptop is a 1394 Net Adapter, & it has a red X
    through it.

    Under Network Connections on the laptop is an Internet Gateway with National
    Access-Broadcom on Upstairs, showing as connected.


    On the laptop the LAN or High-Speed show:

    LAN for the wired connection, the Wireless Network Connection showing as
    "not connected”, & the 1394 Connection showing as disabled. There is nothing
    for the USB720 modem.

    After unplugging the laptop because I misread something in your post, the
    LAN showed no or limited connectivity, but after hitting repair it is sharing
    the internet with the upstairs Dell, but only if wired.


    The details of each are:


    1. Local Area Connection
    LAN or High-Speed Internet
    Connected

    Broadcom 440x/ 10/100
    Intergrated controller

    IP address: 192.168.06
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    Assigned by DHCP

    2. Wireless Network Connection
    Only detail is not connected

    3. 1394 Connection
    LAN or High-speed Internet
    Disabled
    1394 Net Adapter

    Thanks again for all you time, you’re a great help & I really appreciate it!


  17. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    "Lem" wrote:

    > Justpast40 wrote:
    >
    > > I appreciate all your help!
    > >
    > > I got the ICS back after several system restores, but now when I try to
    > > connect the way I did, I get a pop-up "box" with dial-up name & password.
    > > Name is phone # @vzw3g.com, & password shows with stars & save already
    > > checked. I did not input any of this, so I have no idea what where it came
    > > from. Rather than proceed with that intenet connection, & have it saved, I'm
    > > signed on with the laptop where I did not get that pop-up. Could I have
    > > inadvertently changed something that created this pop-up since it is not on
    > > laptop but is in other PC, however not occurring earlier today or last
    > > night? The "prompt for name and password, certificate, etc", using the
    > > Options tab on the modems properties in Network Connections is not checked.
    > >
    > > I re-enabled ICS & firewall on modem on upstairs, but when I use ipconfig
    > > /all, it shows no IP address for network adapter.
    > >
    > >

    >
    > The "phone # @vzw3g.com" and corresponding password must have been
    > entered by whatever "wizard" you used to install the software for the
    > USB720, unless it's stored internally on the USB720, which would be very
    > odd. That phone number and password also should appear somewhere in the
    > documentation you got from Verizon when you subscribed to the service.
    >
    > Yes, you must have changed some setting that causes the log-in screen to
    > appear. Don't worry about it for now. Go ahead and connect on the
    > Dell. If you haven't found your username and password in your
    > documentation, and are uneasy about storing the settings, just uncheck
    > the "save username and password" box.
    >
    > Before we try to figure out what's going on with the upstairs Dell, did
    > you do the check of the router configuration I suggested in the last
    > post? I'll repeat it here so you don't have to scroll up and down:
    >
    > First, check the router configuration. Disconnect the router from
    > upstairs, leaving only a cable from your laptop to the router connected.
    > Disconnect the USB720 from the laptop.
    >
    > Open IE or Firefox and in the address box enter 192.168.1.1 and press
    > enter (or click GO).
    >
    > Do you get the login screen for the router?
    >
    > If yes, then at least some of the changes you made didn't get saved
    > after you made them. On the Basic Setup screen, make sure that the
    > "Local IP Address" (just above the radio buttons for enabling/disabling
    > the DHCP server) is set to 192.168.0.x (x can be 2 through 254). Make
    > sure the DHCP Server is disabled. Click the "Save Settings" button at
    > the bottom of the screen.
    >
    > If no, then enter the IP address you selected for the router, enter the
    > router's configuration utility, and make sure that the DHCP server is
    > disabled.
    >
    > Now let's try to figure out what's happening on the upstairs Dell.
    >
    > Plug in the USB720. Connect a cable from upstairs to the router. Boot.
    >
    > Open Device Manager (Start > Run then type "devmgmt.msc" without quotes
    > and click OK).
    >
    > Scroll down until you see "Network Adapters" and click the + to expand
    > this entry. If there are any devices with a yellow exclamation point
    > (see http://www.ezlan.net/network/GhostNIC.jpg) right click them and
    > choose uninstall.
    >
    > You should have an entry for your GVC-REALTEK Ethernet 10/100 PCI
    > Adapter. Right-click, select Properties, and make sure that the
    > drop-down box at the bottom of the General tab says "Enable (use this
    > device)." OK your way out. If the only entry for this adapter was one
    > with an exclamation point (and you removed it), re-boot the computer.
    > Windows should detect the hardware and install the appropriate driver.
    >
    > What else (if anything) is listed under Network Adapters?
    >
    > Now open Network Connections. Please list the icons that you see. You
    > should see at least a Local Area Connection icon. I would also expect
    > you to see an icon for the USB720 and perhaps an icon for Internet Gateway.
    >
    > In the left column of Network Connections, under Network Tasks, the
    > bottom panel should say "Details." As you click on each icon, the
    > "Details" panel will change accordingly. Please post the details for
    > each icon.
    >
    > I'm sorry this is so tedious, but since I can't see your computer, we
    > have to do this back-and-forth stuff.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >



    I did follow your instructions before I used the system restore to fix the
    ICS on the upstairs Dell. Sorry if I missed part of that in my posts.

    I followed your directions in the order provided except when I got to the
    end & did not get an IP address for the upstairs Dell with ipconfig /all. (it
    showed no IP address); at that time I connected the router to the upstairs
    Dell, & the laptop then accessed the internet (as I just did with the
    Nintendo Wii downstairs which is picking up the wireless connection).

    I’d started with accessing the router through the laptop wired to the router
    with the upstairs Dell disconnected from the router, changed the address, &
    disabled the DHCP.

    I’m confused at the part where you say let’s, now let's try to figure out
    what's happening on the upstairs Dell, because except for the window to
    prompt for user name & password from USB mode, which I disabled though the
    Verizon menu, I thought the upstairs Dell was OK since it is sharing the
    internet with the laptop if the laptop is wired. It’s the laptop’s wireless
    that I can’t connect (although as I just found, the Nintendo Wii downstairs
    accessed the wireless signal to connect to the internet.) Doesn’t that mean
    I’m having a problem with the laptop’s wireless adapter acquiring an address
    vs. the upstairs Dell assigning one?

    To get both computers to share the internet I kept the laptop wired to the
    router, shared the ICS on the upstairs Dell with the USB modem attached to
    the upstairs Dell. (they are both Dells). If both the laptop & upstairs
    Dell are wired to the router the internet is shared from the upstairs Dell.

    Sorry if I misread your post, but I don’t understand why if the upstairs
    Dell is sharing the internet with the laptop (if wired) & the Nintendo Wii
    that I need to look at the adapter on the upstairs Dell, I would think I need
    to be on the laptop. Sorry if I’m wrong with this.

    I have both PC’s wired to the router.

    Under Device Manager on the laptop:

    Neither the Broadcom 440x nor the Intel Pro/wireless 2915ABG Network
    connection have an exclamation point, & both show as enabled.

    The only other adapter on the laptop is a 1394 Net Adapter, & it has a red X
    through it.

    Under Network Connections on the laptop is an Internet Gateway with National
    Access-Broadcom on Upstairs, showing as connected.


    On the laptop the LAN or High-Speed show:

    LAN for the wired connection, the Wireless Network Connection showing as
    "not connected”, & the 1394 Connection showing as disabled. There is nothing
    for the USB720 modem.

    After unplugging the laptop because I misread something in your post, the
    LAN showed no or limited connectivity, but after hitting repair it is sharing
    the internet with the upstairs Dell, but only if wired.


    The details of each are:


    1. Local Area Connection
    LAN or High-Speed Internet
    Connected

    Broadcom 440x/ 10/100
    Intergrated controller

    IP address: 192.168.06
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    Assigned by DHCP

    2. Wireless Network Connection
    Only detail is not connected

    3. 1394 Connection
    LAN or High-speed Internet
    Disabled
    1394 Net Adapter

    Thanks again for all you time, you’re a great help & I really appreciate it!


  18. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    Justpast40 wrote:
    > "Lem" wrote:
    >
    >> Justpast40 wrote:
    >>
    >>> I appreciate all your help!
    >>>
    >>> I got the ICS back after several system restores, but now when I try to
    >>> connect the way I did, I get a pop-up "box" with dial-up name & password.
    >>> Name is phone # @vzw3g.com, & password shows with stars & save already
    >>> checked. I did not input any of this, so I have no idea what where it came
    >>> from. Rather than proceed with that intenet connection, & have it saved, I'm
    >>> signed on with the laptop where I did not get that pop-up. Could I have
    >>> inadvertently changed something that created this pop-up since it is not on
    >>> laptop but is in other PC, however not occurring earlier today or last
    >>> night? The "prompt for name and password, certificate, etc", using the
    >>> Options tab on the modems properties in Network Connections is not checked.
    >>>
    >>> I re-enabled ICS & firewall on modem on upstairs, but when I use ipconfig
    >>> /all, it shows no IP address for network adapter.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> The "phone # @vzw3g.com" and corresponding password must have been
    >> entered by whatever "wizard" you used to install the software for the
    >> USB720, unless it's stored internally on the USB720, which would be very
    >> odd. That phone number and password also should appear somewhere in the
    >> documentation you got from Verizon when you subscribed to the service.
    >>
    >> Yes, you must have changed some setting that causes the log-in screen to
    >> appear. Don't worry about it for now. Go ahead and connect on the
    >> Dell. If you haven't found your username and password in your
    >> documentation, and are uneasy about storing the settings, just uncheck
    >> the "save username and password" box.
    >>
    >> Before we try to figure out what's going on with the upstairs Dell, did
    >> you do the check of the router configuration I suggested in the last
    >> post? I'll repeat it here so you don't have to scroll up and down:
    >>
    >> First, check the router configuration. Disconnect the router from
    >> upstairs, leaving only a cable from your laptop to the router connected.
    >> Disconnect the USB720 from the laptop.
    >>
    >> Open IE or Firefox and in the address box enter 192.168.1.1 and press
    >> enter (or click GO).
    >>
    >> Do you get the login screen for the router?
    >>
    >> If yes, then at least some of the changes you made didn't get saved
    >> after you made them. On the Basic Setup screen, make sure that the
    >> "Local IP Address" (just above the radio buttons for enabling/disabling
    >> the DHCP server) is set to 192.168.0.x (x can be 2 through 254). Make
    >> sure the DHCP Server is disabled. Click the "Save Settings" button at
    >> the bottom of the screen.
    >>
    >> If no, then enter the IP address you selected for the router, enter the
    >> router's configuration utility, and make sure that the DHCP server is
    >> disabled.
    >>
    >> Now let's try to figure out what's happening on the upstairs Dell.
    >>
    >> Plug in the USB720. Connect a cable from upstairs to the router. Boot.
    >>
    >> Open Device Manager (Start > Run then type "devmgmt.msc" without quotes
    >> and click OK).
    >>
    >> Scroll down until you see "Network Adapters" and click the + to expand
    >> this entry. If there are any devices with a yellow exclamation point
    >> (see http://www.ezlan.net/network/GhostNIC.jpg) right click them and
    >> choose uninstall.
    >>
    >> You should have an entry for your GVC-REALTEK Ethernet 10/100 PCI
    >> Adapter. Right-click, select Properties, and make sure that the
    >> drop-down box at the bottom of the General tab says "Enable (use this
    >> device)." OK your way out. If the only entry for this adapter was one
    >> with an exclamation point (and you removed it), re-boot the computer.
    >> Windows should detect the hardware and install the appropriate driver.
    >>
    >> What else (if anything) is listed under Network Adapters?
    >>
    >> Now open Network Connections. Please list the icons that you see. You
    >> should see at least a Local Area Connection icon. I would also expect
    >> you to see an icon for the USB720 and perhaps an icon for Internet Gateway.
    >>
    >> In the left column of Network Connections, under Network Tasks, the
    >> bottom panel should say "Details." As you click on each icon, the
    >> "Details" panel will change accordingly. Please post the details for
    >> each icon.
    >>
    >> I'm sorry this is so tedious, but since I can't see your computer, we
    >> have to do this back-and-forth stuff.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >>

    >
    >
    > I did follow your instructions before I used the system restore to fix the
    > ICS on the upstairs Dell. Sorry if I missed part of that in my posts.
    >
    > I followed your directions in the order provided except when I got to the
    > end & did not get an IP address for the upstairs Dell with ipconfig /all. (it
    > showed no IP address); at that time I connected the router to the upstairs
    > Dell, & the laptop then accessed the internet (as I just did with the
    > Nintendo Wii downstairs which is picking up the wireless connection).
    >
    > I’d started with accessing the router through the laptop wired to the router
    > with the upstairs Dell disconnected from the router, changed the address, &
    > disabled the DHCP.
    >
    > I’m confused at the part where you say let’s, now let's try to figure out
    > what's happening on the upstairs Dell, because except for the window to
    > prompt for user name & password from USB mode, which I disabled though the
    > Verizon menu, I thought the upstairs Dell was OK since it is sharing the
    > internet with the laptop if the laptop is wired. It’s the laptop’s wireless
    > that I can’t connect (although as I just found, the Nintendo Wii downstairs
    > accessed the wireless signal to connect to the internet.) Doesn’t that mean
    > I’m having a problem with the laptop’s wireless adapter acquiring an address
    > vs. the upstairs Dell assigning one?
    >
    > To get both computers to share the internet I kept the laptop wired to the
    > router, shared the ICS on the upstairs Dell with the USB modem attached to
    > the upstairs Dell. (they are both Dells). If both the laptop & upstairs
    > Dell are wired to the router the internet is shared from the upstairs Dell.
    >
    > Sorry if I misread your post, but I don’t understand why if the upstairs
    > Dell is sharing the internet with the laptop (if wired) & the Nintendo Wii
    > that I need to look at the adapter on the upstairs Dell, I would think I need
    > to be on the laptop. Sorry if I’m wrong with this.
    >
    > I have both PC’s wired to the router.
    >
    > Under Device Manager on the laptop:
    >
    > Neither the Broadcom 440x nor the Intel Pro/wireless 2915ABG Network
    > connection have an exclamation point, & both show as enabled.
    >
    > The only other adapter on the laptop is a 1394 Net Adapter, & it has a red X
    > through it.
    >
    > Under Network Connections on the laptop is an Internet Gateway with National
    > Access-Broadcom on Upstairs, showing as connected.
    >
    >
    > On the laptop the LAN or High-Speed show:
    >
    > LAN for the wired connection, the Wireless Network Connection showing as
    > "not connected”, & the 1394 Connection showing as disabled. There is nothing
    > for the USB720 modem.
    >
    > After unplugging the laptop because I misread something in your post, the
    > LAN showed no or limited connectivity, but after hitting repair it is sharing
    > the internet with the upstairs Dell, but only if wired.
    >
    >
    > The details of each are:
    >
    >
    > 1. Local Area Connection
    > LAN or High-Speed Internet
    > Connected
    >
    > Broadcom 440x/ 10/100
    > Intergrated controller
    >
    > IP address: 192.168.06
    > Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    > Assigned by DHCP
    >
    > 2. Wireless Network Connection
    > Only detail is not connected
    >
    > 3. 1394 Connection
    > LAN or High-speed Internet
    > Disabled
    > 1394 Net Adapter
    >
    > Thanks again for all you time, you’re a great help & I really appreciate it!
    >


    It's always difficult communicating like this.

    If I understand correctly:
    -- you can access the Internet from the Dell
    -- with the router wired to the Dell and with the laptop wired to the
    router, you can access the Internet from the laptop.
    -- you can't yet access the Internet using the wireless connection on
    the laptop.

    If that's correct, you've made real progress.

    In the laptop:

    First, make sure that the built-in wireless adapter of your laptop is
    turned on. Most laptops have a small physical switch somewhere on the
    laptop or a Fn+Fx key press combination that turns the wireless
    adapter's radio on or off. You'll have to check the laptop's User Guide
    for info on this.

    In Network Connections, double-click on the icon for the wireless
    adapter. You should get a screen like this:
    http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr.../General.shtml

    Click the "view wireless networks" button. You should see a screen like
    this:
    http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...ks/Index.shtml

    Do you see your network listed? If no, click the refresh network list
    link. Anything?

    Click the "change advanced settings" link. You should get this screen:
    http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...Index--2.shtml

    Under the heading "This connection uses the following items" you should
    have only 4 items:
    Client for Microsoft Networks
    File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks
    QoS Packet Scheduler
    Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)

    If there is anything else listed, highlight it and click "Uninstall".

    Highlight the entry for Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click
    "Properties". You should get:
    http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...Auto_DNS.shtml

    Make sure the radio buttons for to obtain an IP address automatically
    and a DNS server automatically are selected. Click the Advanced button.
    You should get this:
    http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr.../General.shtml

    On the General tab, check the box to use the gateway; on the WINS tab,
    select the radio button to Enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP.

    OK your way out until you're back at the screen where you see the list
    of the 4 items used by the connection. Click the Wireless Networks tab.
    You should see:
    http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...ks/Index.shtml

    Make sure the box to let Windows configure your wireless network
    settings is checked. If your network is listed under Preferred
    networks, select it and click Properties. You should get this:
    http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...isabled).shtml

    This is the screen where you (later) will set your encryption level (WPA
    or WPA2 and enter the passphrase. You will set these first in the
    router's configuration screen, doing so while wired to the router. On
    the "Authentication" tab, make sure that the box to Enable IEEE 802.1x
    is UNchecked. On the "Connection" tab, check the box to automatically
    connect. OK your way out.

    If your network was not listed under Preferred networks, just click the
    Add button. The rest is the same.

    Try the View wireless networks screen now. Is your network listed? You
    should be able to connect now.

    If you are still having difficulty, there may be a utility provided by
    the laptop manufacturer or the wireless adapter manufacturer that's
    competing with Windows to configure the wireless adapter. You can have
    one utility or the other, but not both running simultaneously. If there
    is another utility running, you probably will see an icon in the System
    Notification Area (next to the clock). You should be able to access its
    menu and disable it. For more on this topic, see
    http://www.ezlan.net/wireless.html


    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

  19. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband


    > It's always difficult communicating like this.
    >
    > If I understand correctly:
    > -- you can access the Internet from the Dell
    > -- with the router wired to the Dell and with the laptop wired to the
    > router, you can access the Internet from the laptop.
    > -- you can't yet access the Internet using the wireless connection on
    > the laptop.
    >
    > If that's correct, you've made real progress.
    >
    > In the laptop:
    >
    > First, make sure that the built-in wireless adapter of your laptop is
    > turned on. Most laptops have a small physical switch somewhere on the
    > laptop or a Fn+Fx key press combination that turns the wireless
    > adapter's radio on or off. You'll have to check the laptop's User Guide
    > for info on this.
    >
    > In Network Connections, double-click on the icon for the wireless
    > adapter. You should get a screen like this:
    > http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr.../General.shtml
    >
    > Click the "view wireless networks" button. You should see a screen like
    > this:
    > http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...ks/Index.shtml
    >
    > Do you see your network listed? If no, click the refresh network list
    > link. Anything?
    >
    > Click the "change advanced settings" link. You should get this screen:
    > http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...Index--2.shtml
    >
    > Under the heading "This connection uses the following items" you should
    > have only 4 items:
    > Client for Microsoft Networks
    > File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks
    > QoS Packet Scheduler
    > Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
    >
    > If there is anything else listed, highlight it and click "Uninstall".
    >
    > Highlight the entry for Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click
    > "Properties". You should get:
    > http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...Auto_DNS.shtml
    >
    > Make sure the radio buttons for to obtain an IP address automatically
    > and a DNS server automatically are selected. Click the Advanced button.
    > You should get this:
    > http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr.../General.shtml
    >
    > On the General tab, check the box to use the gateway; on the WINS tab,
    > select the radio button to Enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP.
    >
    > OK your way out until you're back at the screen where you see the list
    > of the 4 items used by the connection. Click the Wireless Networks tab.
    > You should see:
    > http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...ks/Index.shtml
    >
    > Make sure the box to let Windows configure your wireless network
    > settings is checked. If your network is listed under Preferred
    > networks, select it and click Properties. You should get this:
    > http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...isabled).shtml
    >
    > This is the screen where you (later) will set your encryption level (WPA
    > or WPA2 and enter the passphrase. You will set these first in the
    > router's configuration screen, doing so while wired to the router. On
    > the "Authentication" tab, make sure that the box to Enable IEEE 802.1x
    > is UNchecked. On the "Connection" tab, check the box to automatically
    > connect. OK your way out.
    >
    > If your network was not listed under Preferred networks, just click the
    > Add button. The rest is the same.
    >
    > Try the View wireless networks screen now. Is your network listed? You
    > should be able to connect now.
    >
    > If you are still having difficulty, there may be a utility provided by
    > the laptop manufacturer or the wireless adapter manufacturer that's
    > competing with Windows to configure the wireless adapter. You can have
    > one utility or the other, but not both running simultaneously. If there
    > is another utility running, you probably will see an icon in the System
    > Notification Area (next to the clock). You should be able to access its
    > menu and disable it. For more on this topic, see
    > http://www.ezlan.net/wireless.html
    >
    >
    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >





    S U C C E S S !

    It was a built in utility in the Start>Programs

    FYI in case it’s a benefit for anyone else. The adapter is Intel
    Pro/Wireless 2915ABG & the installed utility is of course Intel ProSet
    Wireless. I feel so stupid! I’ve only seen this in Start>Programs for the
    past year.

    It walked me through detecting & setting up the wireless network (even
    picked up the only neighbor’s wireless name. I named the network/profile, it
    took me through security settings, which when I read back on your post should
    be WPA2-personal (there was option for WPA-2 enterprise), but not having the
    male aversion to reading directions you cited, I actually went back & re-read
    yours.

    The data encryption options were WEP, TKIP, or AES-CCMP, which I chose as it
    was closest to something you wrote earlier.

    The Enable 802.1x is checked by default.

    I hope you know how much help you’ve been. It’s great that there are people
    like you out there you take their time to help others.

    There is another thing about this wireless network in case it helps anyone
    else. After going through the above set-up, it appeared to work, but would
    not connect. Although no instruction from the setup, I restarted, & was then
    able to connect (it found my Linksys & the neighbor’s wireless network’s
    name). I have a few more : - )questions though.

    The neighbor’s network has a lock next to the router when the Connect to the
    Wireless Network Box appears & mine does not, is that a concern, & what does
    it mean? When my Intel PROSET/Wireless launched, under Profile, I see my
    router with a lock, my profile name, & the linksys as the network.

    I’m also getting a warning that “Another wireless network utility is
    communicating with the Intel Pro/Wireless adapter. To avoid conflicts,
    Intel’s profile management feature’s have been temporarily disabled.”

    Is that the USB Modem’s software from when it was installed & connected to
    the laptop? When the VZ Access Manager started (used to connect the USB
    modem when it was actually attached to the laptop) it has both my network’s
    name & the neighbor’s network’s name.

    URRRR>>>>> Now the laptop won’t connect to the wireless network, although it
    sees it, but I restarted & it came back. I’m thinking it’s the VZ Access, as
    both my linksys & the neighbor’s are appearing under networks in the VZ
    access instead of the USB modem when it was attached to the laptop.

    I’m going to uninstall the VZ Access, make sure all the Intel Pro features
    are working, & then move the laptop back downstairs. If that still works,
    then I’m off to see if we can get the wireless connecting in hubby’s cave.

    I’m hoping not to have to bother you again, but if you could answer the
    above question about the lock next to the neighbor’s router signal, but not
    mine, I would surely appreciate it, as I have all you’ve done, & if you think
    the “other” wireless LAN utility communicating with the Intel is anything
    other than the VZ access, please help again.














  20. Re: Advice for a newbie with Wireless Broadband

    Justpast40 wrote:
    >> It's always difficult communicating like this.
    >>
    >> If I understand correctly:
    >> -- you can access the Internet from the Dell
    >> -- with the router wired to the Dell and with the laptop wired to the
    >> router, you can access the Internet from the laptop.
    >> -- you can't yet access the Internet using the wireless connection on
    >> the laptop.
    >>
    >> If that's correct, you've made real progress.
    >>
    >> In the laptop:
    >>
    >> First, make sure that the built-in wireless adapter of your laptop is
    >> turned on. Most laptops have a small physical switch somewhere on the
    >> laptop or a Fn+Fx key press combination that turns the wireless
    >> adapter's radio on or off. You'll have to check the laptop's User Guide
    >> for info on this.
    >>
    >> In Network Connections, double-click on the icon for the wireless
    >> adapter. You should get a screen like this:
    >> http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr.../General.shtml
    >>
    >> Click the "view wireless networks" button. You should see a screen like
    >> this:
    >> http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...ks/Index.shtml
    >>
    >> Do you see your network listed? If no, click the refresh network list
    >> link. Anything?
    >>
    >> Click the "change advanced settings" link. You should get this screen:
    >> http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...Index--2.shtml
    >>
    >> Under the heading "This connection uses the following items" you should
    >> have only 4 items:
    >> Client for Microsoft Networks
    >> File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks
    >> QoS Packet Scheduler
    >> Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
    >>
    >> If there is anything else listed, highlight it and click "Uninstall".
    >>
    >> Highlight the entry for Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and click
    >> "Properties". You should get:
    >> http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...Auto_DNS.shtml
    >>
    >> Make sure the radio buttons for to obtain an IP address automatically
    >> and a DNS server automatically are selected. Click the Advanced button.
    >> You should get this:
    >> http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr.../General.shtml
    >>
    >> On the General tab, check the box to use the gateway; on the WINS tab,
    >> select the radio button to Enable NetBIOS over TCP/IP.
    >>
    >> OK your way out until you're back at the screen where you see the list
    >> of the 4 items used by the connection. Click the Wireless Networks tab.
    >> You should see:
    >> http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...ks/Index.shtml
    >>
    >> Make sure the box to let Windows configure your wireless network
    >> settings is checked. If your network is listed under Preferred
    >> networks, select it and click Properties. You should get this:
    >> http://screenshots.modemhelp.net/scr...isabled).shtml
    >>
    >> This is the screen where you (later) will set your encryption level (WPA
    >> or WPA2 and enter the passphrase. You will set these first in the
    >> router's configuration screen, doing so while wired to the router. On
    >> the "Authentication" tab, make sure that the box to Enable IEEE 802.1x
    >> is UNchecked. On the "Connection" tab, check the box to automatically
    >> connect. OK your way out.
    >>
    >> If your network was not listed under Preferred networks, just click the
    >> Add button. The rest is the same.
    >>
    >> Try the View wireless networks screen now. Is your network listed? You
    >> should be able to connect now.
    >>
    >> If you are still having difficulty, there may be a utility provided by
    >> the laptop manufacturer or the wireless adapter manufacturer that's
    >> competing with Windows to configure the wireless adapter. You can have
    >> one utility or the other, but not both running simultaneously. If there
    >> is another utility running, you probably will see an icon in the System
    >> Notification Area (next to the clock). You should be able to access its
    >> menu and disable it. For more on this topic, see
    >> http://www.ezlan.net/wireless.html
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    >
    > S U C C E S S !
    >
    > It was a built in utility in the Start>Programs
    >
    > FYI in case it’s a benefit for anyone else. The adapter is Intel
    > Pro/Wireless 2915ABG & the installed utility is of course Intel ProSet
    > Wireless. I feel so stupid! I’ve only seen this in Start>Programs for the
    > past year.
    >
    > It walked me through detecting & setting up the wireless network (even
    > picked up the only neighbor’s wireless name. I named the network/profile, it
    > took me through security settings, which when I read back on your post should
    > be WPA2-personal (there was option for WPA-2 enterprise), but not having the
    > male aversion to reading directions you cited, I actually went back & re-read
    > yours.
    >
    > The data encryption options were WEP, TKIP, or AES-CCMP, which I chose as it
    > was closest to something you wrote earlier.
    >
    > The Enable 802.1x is checked by default.
    >
    > I hope you know how much help you’ve been. It’s great that there are people
    > like you out there you take their time to help others.
    >
    > There is another thing about this wireless network in case it helps anyone
    > else. After going through the above set-up, it appeared to work, but would
    > not connect. Although no instruction from the setup, I restarted, & was then
    > able to connect (it found my Linksys & the neighbor’s wireless network’s
    > name). I have a few more : - )questions though.
    >
    > The neighbor’s network has a lock next to the router when the Connect to the
    > Wireless Network Box appears & mine does not, is that a concern, & what does
    > it mean? When my Intel PROSET/Wireless launched, under Profile, I see my
    > router with a lock, my profile name, & the linksys as the network.
    >
    > I’m also getting a warning that “Another wireless network utility is
    > communicating with the Intel Pro/Wireless adapter. To avoid conflicts,
    > Intel’s profile management feature’s have been temporarily disabled.”
    >
    > Is that the USB Modem’s software from when it was installed & connected to
    > the laptop? When the VZ Access Manager started (used to connect the USB
    > modem when it was actually attached to the laptop) it has both my network’s
    > name & the neighbor’s network’s name.
    >
    > URRRR>>>>> Now the laptop won’t connect to the wireless network, although it
    > sees it, but I restarted & it came back. I’m thinking it’s the VZ Access, as
    > both my linksys & the neighbor’s are appearing under networks in the VZ
    > access instead of the USB modem when it was attached to the laptop.
    >
    > I’m going to uninstall the VZ Access, make sure all the Intel Pro features
    > are working, & then move the laptop back downstairs. If that still works,
    > then I’m off to see if we can get the wireless connecting in hubby’s cave.
    >
    > I’m hoping not to have to bother you again, but if you could answer the
    > above question about the lock next to the neighbor’s router signal, but not
    > mine, I would surely appreciate it, as I have all you’ve done, & if you think
    > the “other” wireless LAN utility communicating with the Intel is anything
    > other than the VZ access, please help again.
    >


    There are still a few issues. Part of the problem is that I can't quite
    visualize everything you're describing.

    VZ Access seems to be a "do-everything" utility that works with both
    wireless broadband and wifi adapters, so your guess may well be correct.

    The warning also may mean that you have not disabled the Windows
    Wireless Zero Configuration utility. It's OK to use the Intel ProSet
    utility (it probably has some extra features that may be useful), but
    you can't have both utilities active at the same time. Even though you
    configured the adapter with the Intel utility, it sounds as if it is
    smart enough to turn itself off when it detected Windows and/or VZ
    Access trying to configure the adapter. See
    http://www.ezlan.net/wzc.html for directions on how to disable Windows WZC.

    The fact that the neighbor's wireless network has a lock next to its
    name and yours does not means that your neighbor's network is secured
    (by encryption) and yours is not. That means that you can't connect to
    your neighbor's network but your neighbor can connect to yours. In
    order to secure a wireless network, you must set the encryption settings
    _on the router_. The settings for the adapter must then match the
    settings in the router.

    What I don't understand is how, after you configured the adapter to use
    encryption, you are connecting to an unencrypted network. It may be
    that all your work configuring the adapter with the Intel ProSet utility
    is being ignored, given the warning that its "profile management
    features have been temporarily disabled."

    Just to double check, open a web browser and enter the IP address you
    set for the router. Login to the browser's configuration utility (did
    you change the default password?).

    Click the Wireless tab. For Wireless Network Mode, you should be set to
    G-only or Mixed (G-only will be better for you). Did you change the
    default SSID from Linksys to something you can recognize? And is the
    radio button to Enable SSID broadcast selected?

    Note that if you make any changes to the router's wireless settings
    while you are connected to it wirelessly, you very likely will be
    disconnected. So, if you're connected wirelessly, just look for now.
    Make any changes, if necessary, while you're connected to the router
    with a cable.

    Click the Wireless Security tab. Is the Security Mode set to
    WPA2-Preshared Key (or WPA2-Personal)? Is the WPA Algorithm set to AES?
    And here is where your passphrase goes (IIRC, Linksys will show it in
    clear here). You can leave Group Key Renewal at 3600.

    Finally, the box for IEEE 802.1X on the "Authentication" tab of your
    wireless network properties should not be checked. If things are
    working OK, I suppose you can leave it, but this is meant for corporate
    networks that use special security hardware. You may or may not be able
    to do anything about this. On my setup, the entire "Authentication" tab
    is greyed out and can't be changed.


    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

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