ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration - Wireless

This is a discussion on ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration - Wireless ; Can't seem to find a configuration combination to allow WiFi router connected laptop to recognize ICS-connected resources - that is, I want to use a printer on one of my ICS-networked pcs from a wifi-router (DSL) connected laptop. Anyone got ...

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Thread: ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration

  1. ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration

    Can't seem to find a configuration combination to allow WiFi router connected
    laptop to recognize ICS-connected resources - that is, I want to use a
    printer on one of my ICS-networked pcs from a wifi-router (DSL) connected
    laptop. Anyone got a match?...

    In more detail:

    ICS network, configured in a logical and physical bus topology, connected
    via separate NIC to a Westell 327W router, from which the hardwired network
    pcs obtain their Internet connectivity. n-Number of laptops wifi-connected
    to same router. ICS network pcs can "see" laptops, but laptops cannot "see"
    the pcs.


  2. Re: ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration

    Hi
    Make sure that the Wireless Router is connected and configured as an Access
    Point.
    The principle is described here,
    http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "kahuna" wrote in message
    news:9CC04F72-5F68-4795-900D-355B8B18458A@microsoft.com...
    > Can't seem to find a configuration combination to allow WiFi router
    > connected
    > laptop to recognize ICS-connected resources - that is, I want to use a
    > printer on one of my ICS-networked pcs from a wifi-router (DSL) connected
    > laptop. Anyone got a match?...
    >
    > In more detail:
    >
    > ICS network, configured in a logical and physical bus topology, connected
    > via separate NIC to a Westell 327W router, from which the hardwired
    > network
    > pcs obtain their Internet connectivity. n-Number of laptops
    > wifi-connected
    > to same router. ICS network pcs can "see" laptops, but laptops cannot
    > "see"
    > the pcs.
    >




  3. Re: ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration

    Thanks, but tried advice from EZLAN-link (plus permutations), to no avail.
    Perhaps my understanding of Access Point needs honing.

    As I understand µSoft ICS, it acts as a network address translator - e.g.,
    my 10b2 PCs are "seen" as one IP address by the outside world. I can ping
    and share resources of the wifi-DSL router-conneced laptops from any of the
    10b2 PCs, but not vice-versa.

    10b2 NIC of ICS server: 192.168.0.1
    Router NIC (of ICS server): DHCP configured (by DSL Router)
    Router: DHCP enabled; 192.168.1.1

    Any further suggestion would be appreciated.

    "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:

    > Hi
    > Make sure that the Wireless Router is connected and configured as an Access
    > Point.
    > The principle is described here,
    > http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >
    > "kahuna" wrote in message
    > news:9CC04F72-5F68-4795-900D-355B8B18458A@microsoft.com...
    > > Can't seem to find a configuration combination to allow WiFi router
    > > connected
    > > laptop to recognize ICS-connected resources - that is, I want to use a
    > > printer on one of my ICS-networked pcs from a wifi-router (DSL) connected
    > > laptop. Anyone got a match?...
    > >
    > > In more detail:
    > >
    > > ICS network, configured in a logical and physical bus topology, connected
    > > via separate NIC to a Westell 327W router, from which the hardwired
    > > network
    > > pcs obtain their Internet connectivity. n-Number of laptops
    > > wifi-connected
    > > to same router. ICS network pcs can "see" laptops, but laptops cannot
    > > "see"
    > > the pcs.
    > >

    >
    >
    >


  4. Re: ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration

    kahuna wrote:
    > Thanks, but tried advice from EZLAN-link (plus permutations), to no avail.
    > Perhaps my understanding of Access Point needs honing.
    >
    > As I understand µSoft ICS, it acts as a network address translator - e.g.,
    > my 10b2 PCs are "seen" as one IP address by the outside world. I can ping
    > and share resources of the wifi-DSL router-conneced laptops from any of the
    > 10b2 PCs, but not vice-versa.
    >
    > 10b2 NIC of ICS server: 192.168.0.1
    > Router NIC (of ICS server): DHCP configured (by DSL Router)
    > Router: DHCP enabled; 192.168.1.1
    >
    > Any further suggestion would be appreciated.
    >
    > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    >
    >> Hi
    >> Make sure that the Wireless Router is connected and configured as an Access
    >> Point.
    >> The principle is described here,
    >> http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >>
    >> "kahuna" wrote in message
    >> news:9CC04F72-5F68-4795-900D-355B8B18458A@microsoft.com...
    >>> Can't seem to find a configuration combination to allow WiFi router
    >>> connected
    >>> laptop to recognize ICS-connected resources - that is, I want to use a
    >>> printer on one of my ICS-networked pcs from a wifi-router (DSL) connected
    >>> laptop. Anyone got a match?...
    >>>
    >>> In more detail:
    >>>
    >>> ICS network, configured in a logical and physical bus topology, connected
    >>> via separate NIC to a Westell 327W router, from which the hardwired
    >>> network
    >>> pcs obtain their Internet connectivity. n-Number of laptops
    >>> wifi-connected
    >>> to same router. ICS network pcs can "see" laptops, but laptops cannot
    >>> "see"
    >>> the pcs.
    >>>

    >>
    >>

    You have two separate sub-nets. If you check the IP addresses of the
    wifi connected laptops, you should see that that they are of the form
    192.168.1.x, as assigned by the router's DHCP server. Similarly, the
    router's DHCP server should have assigned the NIC in your "ICS server"
    to a similar IP address (you left that out of your post).

    On the other hand, if you check the IP addresses of the "ICS network"
    computers, you should see that they are of the form 192.168.0.x, as
    assigned by the ICS IP address allocator.

    One way of getting all of your computers to be able to share resources
    with one another is to get them all on the same subnet. To do this,
    disconnect the router from the broadband modem and instead connect the
    broadband modem to the "router NIC" of your "ICS server" computer. Then
    "configure the router as an access point." Basically, this means to
    disable the router's DHCP server, set the router's _LAN facing_ IP
    address to 192.168.0.x, and connect one of the router's _LAN_ ports to
    your ICS network.

    I assume that you have some sort of switch connected to the "ICS NIC" to
    which the "ICS network" computers are connected. By connecting the
    router as described above, your are essentially adding a "wireless
    switch" in parallel to your wired switch. All of the computers
    connected either to the wireless switch (router as access point) or
    wired switch will obtain addresses from the ICS allocator; all will be
    of the form 192.168.0.x, and all will be able to share resources (once
    you have set up file & printer sharing and dealt with permissions and
    firewalls, of course).

    The main drawback to the above configuration is that it makes your "ICS
    server" the bottleneck for ALL of your computers, including your wifi
    laptops. You will have to leave this computer on in order for the wifi
    laptops to access the Internet, whereas before you didn't have to.

    Essentially, what you are doing

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

  5. Re: ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration

    Thank you Lem (and Jack); I'll pursue that approach in the near future. For
    now, the epiphany you allude to (get 'em on the same subnet) and that I had
    late last night will suffice:

    Left DSL Modem/Router in control of DHCP and DNS (192.168.1.1)

    Set my "ICS" 10b2 NIC to 192.168.1.2, default gateway 192.168.1.1

    Let the "Router NIC" of my "ICS server" be configured by DSL Modem/Router DHCP

    Bridged the "Router" NIC and the "ICS" NIC.

    All PCs and wifi-laptops are now communicating and sharing. If I'm not
    mistaken, I still have a residual Internet-bottleneck on the 10b2 network (at
    the "ICS server"), but the wifi-laptops are independent of this.
    Unfortunately, I also no longer have the ICS/NAT protection that used to be
    afforded the 10b2 PCs.


    "Lem" wrote:

    > kahuna wrote:
    > > Thanks, but tried advice from EZLAN-link (plus permutations), to no avail.
    > > Perhaps my understanding of Access Point needs honing.
    > >
    > > As I understand µSoft ICS, it acts as a network address translator - e.g.,
    > > my 10b2 PCs are "seen" as one IP address by the outside world. I can ping
    > > and share resources of the wifi-DSL router-conneced laptops from any of the
    > > 10b2 PCs, but not vice-versa.
    > >
    > > 10b2 NIC of ICS server: 192.168.0.1
    > > Router NIC (of ICS server): DHCP configured (by DSL Router)
    > > Router: DHCP enabled; 192.168.1.1
    > >
    > > Any further suggestion would be appreciated.
    > >
    > > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    > >
    > >> Hi
    > >> Make sure that the Wireless Router is connected and configured as an Access
    > >> Point.
    > >> The principle is described here,
    > >> http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    > >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    > >>
    > >> "kahuna" wrote in message
    > >> news:9CC04F72-5F68-4795-900D-355B8B18458A@microsoft.com...
    > >>> Can't seem to find a configuration combination to allow WiFi router
    > >>> connected
    > >>> laptop to recognize ICS-connected resources - that is, I want to use a
    > >>> printer on one of my ICS-networked pcs from a wifi-router (DSL) connected
    > >>> laptop. Anyone got a match?...
    > >>>
    > >>> In more detail:
    > >>>
    > >>> ICS network, configured in a logical and physical bus topology, connected
    > >>> via separate NIC to a Westell 327W router, from which the hardwired
    > >>> network
    > >>> pcs obtain their Internet connectivity. n-Number of laptops
    > >>> wifi-connected
    > >>> to same router. ICS network pcs can "see" laptops, but laptops cannot
    > >>> "see"
    > >>> the pcs.
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>

    > You have two separate sub-nets. If you check the IP addresses of the
    > wifi connected laptops, you should see that that they are of the form
    > 192.168.1.x, as assigned by the router's DHCP server. Similarly, the
    > router's DHCP server should have assigned the NIC in your "ICS server"
    > to a similar IP address (you left that out of your post).
    >
    > On the other hand, if you check the IP addresses of the "ICS network"
    > computers, you should see that they are of the form 192.168.0.x, as
    > assigned by the ICS IP address allocator.
    >
    > One way of getting all of your computers to be able to share resources
    > with one another is to get them all on the same subnet. To do this,
    > disconnect the router from the broadband modem and instead connect the
    > broadband modem to the "router NIC" of your "ICS server" computer. Then
    > "configure the router as an access point." Basically, this means to
    > disable the router's DHCP server, set the router's _LAN facing_ IP
    > address to 192.168.0.x, and connect one of the router's _LAN_ ports to
    > your ICS network.
    >
    > I assume that you have some sort of switch connected to the "ICS NIC" to
    > which the "ICS network" computers are connected. By connecting the
    > router as described above, your are essentially adding a "wireless
    > switch" in parallel to your wired switch. All of the computers
    > connected either to the wireless switch (router as access point) or
    > wired switch will obtain addresses from the ICS allocator; all will be
    > of the form 192.168.0.x, and all will be able to share resources (once
    > you have set up file & printer sharing and dealt with permissions and
    > firewalls, of course).
    >
    > The main drawback to the above configuration is that it makes your "ICS
    > server" the bottleneck for ALL of your computers, including your wifi
    > laptops. You will have to leave this computer on in order for the wifi
    > laptops to access the Internet, whereas before you didn't have to.
    >
    > Essentially, what you are doing
    >
    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >


  6. Re: ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration

    Thank you Lem (and Jack); I'll pursue that approach in the near future. For
    now, the epiphany you allude to (get 'em on the same subnet) and that I had
    late last night will suffice:

    Left DSL Modem/Router in control of DHCP and DNS (192.168.1.1)

    Set my "ICS" 10b2 NIC to 192.168.1.2, default gateway 192.168.1.1

    Let the "Router NIC" of my "ICS server" be configured by DSL Modem/Router DHCP

    Bridged the "Router" NIC and the "ICS" NIC.

    All PCs and wifi-laptops are now communicating and sharing. If I'm not
    mistaken, I still have a residual Internet-bottleneck on the 10b2 network (at
    the "ICS server"), but the wifi-laptops are independent of this.
    Unfortunately, I also no longer have the ICS/NAT protection that used to be
    afforded the 10b2 PCs.


    "Lem" wrote:

    > kahuna wrote:
    > > Thanks, but tried advice from EZLAN-link (plus permutations), to no avail.
    > > Perhaps my understanding of Access Point needs honing.
    > >
    > > As I understand µSoft ICS, it acts as a network address translator - e.g.,
    > > my 10b2 PCs are "seen" as one IP address by the outside world. I can ping
    > > and share resources of the wifi-DSL router-conneced laptops from any of the
    > > 10b2 PCs, but not vice-versa.
    > >
    > > 10b2 NIC of ICS server: 192.168.0.1
    > > Router NIC (of ICS server): DHCP configured (by DSL Router)
    > > Router: DHCP enabled; 192.168.1.1
    > >
    > > Any further suggestion would be appreciated.
    > >
    > > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    > >
    > >> Hi
    > >> Make sure that the Wireless Router is connected and configured as an Access
    > >> Point.
    > >> The principle is described here,
    > >> http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    > >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    > >>
    > >> "kahuna" wrote in message
    > >> news:9CC04F72-5F68-4795-900D-355B8B18458A@microsoft.com...
    > >>> Can't seem to find a configuration combination to allow WiFi router
    > >>> connected
    > >>> laptop to recognize ICS-connected resources - that is, I want to use a
    > >>> printer on one of my ICS-networked pcs from a wifi-router (DSL) connected
    > >>> laptop. Anyone got a match?...
    > >>>
    > >>> In more detail:
    > >>>
    > >>> ICS network, configured in a logical and physical bus topology, connected
    > >>> via separate NIC to a Westell 327W router, from which the hardwired
    > >>> network
    > >>> pcs obtain their Internet connectivity. n-Number of laptops
    > >>> wifi-connected
    > >>> to same router. ICS network pcs can "see" laptops, but laptops cannot
    > >>> "see"
    > >>> the pcs.
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>

    > You have two separate sub-nets. If you check the IP addresses of the
    > wifi connected laptops, you should see that that they are of the form
    > 192.168.1.x, as assigned by the router's DHCP server. Similarly, the
    > router's DHCP server should have assigned the NIC in your "ICS server"
    > to a similar IP address (you left that out of your post).
    >
    > On the other hand, if you check the IP addresses of the "ICS network"
    > computers, you should see that they are of the form 192.168.0.x, as
    > assigned by the ICS IP address allocator.
    >
    > One way of getting all of your computers to be able to share resources
    > with one another is to get them all on the same subnet. To do this,
    > disconnect the router from the broadband modem and instead connect the
    > broadband modem to the "router NIC" of your "ICS server" computer. Then
    > "configure the router as an access point." Basically, this means to
    > disable the router's DHCP server, set the router's _LAN facing_ IP
    > address to 192.168.0.x, and connect one of the router's _LAN_ ports to
    > your ICS network.
    >
    > I assume that you have some sort of switch connected to the "ICS NIC" to
    > which the "ICS network" computers are connected. By connecting the
    > router as described above, your are essentially adding a "wireless
    > switch" in parallel to your wired switch. All of the computers
    > connected either to the wireless switch (router as access point) or
    > wired switch will obtain addresses from the ICS allocator; all will be
    > of the form 192.168.0.x, and all will be able to share resources (once
    > you have set up file & printer sharing and dealt with permissions and
    > firewalls, of course).
    >
    > The main drawback to the above configuration is that it makes your "ICS
    > server" the bottleneck for ALL of your computers, including your wifi
    > laptops. You will have to leave this computer on in order for the wifi
    > laptops to access the Internet, whereas before you didn't have to.
    >
    > Essentially, what you are doing
    >
    > --
    > Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >


  7. Re: ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration

    Glad you got things working. You're correct. You bridged the two
    networks and no longer are using ICS (or else you wouldn't have been
    able to configure the IP address on your "ICS" NIC). However, the
    Westell router itself provides NAT services, so your 10b2 computers (the
    "ICS network") are protected by that -- at least from the Internet, but
    not from the wireless laptops.

    If you wanted to spend a little $$, now that you're no longer using ICS,
    perhaps you could get a 10base2 to 10baseT (bnc-to-UTP) converter and
    connect your 10b2 coax to a LAN port on the router. That way, your "ICS
    server" computer is just another client on your LAN and can be turned
    off with no effect on the connectivity of the others.

    Examples only; no experience one way or the other with such products:
    http://www.omnitron-systems.com/prod..._flexpoint.php
    http://www.transition.com/Transition...=J/E-CX-TBT-02

    kahuna wrote:
    > Thank you Lem (and Jack); I'll pursue that approach in the near future. For
    > now, the epiphany you allude to (get 'em on the same subnet) and that I had
    > late last night will suffice:
    >
    > Left DSL Modem/Router in control of DHCP and DNS (192.168.1.1)
    >
    > Set my "ICS" 10b2 NIC to 192.168.1.2, default gateway 192.168.1.1
    >
    > Let the "Router NIC" of my "ICS server" be configured by DSL Modem/Router DHCP
    >
    > Bridged the "Router" NIC and the "ICS" NIC.
    >
    > All PCs and wifi-laptops are now communicating and sharing. If I'm not
    > mistaken, I still have a residual Internet-bottleneck on the 10b2 network (at
    > the "ICS server"), but the wifi-laptops are independent of this.
    > Unfortunately, I also no longer have the ICS/NAT protection that used to be
    > afforded the 10b2 PCs.
    >
    >
    > "Lem" wrote:
    >
    >> kahuna wrote:
    >>> Thanks, but tried advice from EZLAN-link (plus permutations), to no avail.
    >>> Perhaps my understanding of Access Point needs honing.
    >>>
    >>> As I understand µSoft ICS, it acts as a network address translator - e.g.,
    >>> my 10b2 PCs are "seen" as one IP address by the outside world. I can ping
    >>> and share resources of the wifi-DSL router-conneced laptops from any of the
    >>> 10b2 PCs, but not vice-versa.
    >>>
    >>> 10b2 NIC of ICS server: 192.168.0.1
    >>> Router NIC (of ICS server): DHCP configured (by DSL Router)
    >>> Router: DHCP enabled; 192.168.1.1
    >>>
    >>> Any further suggestion would be appreciated.
    >>>
    >>> "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Hi
    >>>> Make sure that the Wireless Router is connected and configured as an Access
    >>>> Point.
    >>>> The principle is described here,
    >>>> http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    >>>> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >>>>
    >>>> "kahuna" wrote in message
    >>>> news:9CC04F72-5F68-4795-900D-355B8B18458A@microsoft.com...
    >>>>> Can't seem to find a configuration combination to allow WiFi router
    >>>>> connected
    >>>>> laptop to recognize ICS-connected resources - that is, I want to use a
    >>>>> printer on one of my ICS-networked pcs from a wifi-router (DSL) connected
    >>>>> laptop. Anyone got a match?...
    >>>>>
    >>>>> In more detail:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> ICS network, configured in a logical and physical bus topology, connected
    >>>>> via separate NIC to a Westell 327W router, from which the hardwired
    >>>>> network
    >>>>> pcs obtain their Internet connectivity. n-Number of laptops
    >>>>> wifi-connected
    >>>>> to same router. ICS network pcs can "see" laptops, but laptops cannot
    >>>>> "see"
    >>>>> the pcs.
    >>>>>
    >>>>

    >> You have two separate sub-nets. If you check the IP addresses of the
    >> wifi connected laptops, you should see that that they are of the form
    >> 192.168.1.x, as assigned by the router's DHCP server. Similarly, the
    >> router's DHCP server should have assigned the NIC in your "ICS server"
    >> to a similar IP address (you left that out of your post).
    >>
    >> On the other hand, if you check the IP addresses of the "ICS network"
    >> computers, you should see that they are of the form 192.168.0.x, as
    >> assigned by the ICS IP address allocator.
    >>
    >> One way of getting all of your computers to be able to share resources
    >> with one another is to get them all on the same subnet. To do this,
    >> disconnect the router from the broadband modem and instead connect the
    >> broadband modem to the "router NIC" of your "ICS server" computer. Then
    >> "configure the router as an access point." Basically, this means to
    >> disable the router's DHCP server, set the router's _LAN facing_ IP
    >> address to 192.168.0.x, and connect one of the router's _LAN_ ports to
    >> your ICS network.
    >>
    >> I assume that you have some sort of switch connected to the "ICS NIC" to
    >> which the "ICS network" computers are connected. By connecting the
    >> router as described above, your are essentially adding a "wireless
    >> switch" in parallel to your wired switch. All of the computers
    >> connected either to the wireless switch (router as access point) or
    >> wired switch will obtain addresses from the ICS allocator; all will be
    >> of the form 192.168.0.x, and all will be able to share resources (once
    >> you have set up file & printer sharing and dealt with permissions and
    >> firewalls, of course).
    >>
    >> The main drawback to the above configuration is that it makes your "ICS
    >> server" the bottleneck for ALL of your computers, including your wifi
    >> laptops. You will have to leave this computer on in order for the wifi
    >> laptops to access the Internet, whereas before you didn't have to.
    >>
    >> Essentially, what you are doing
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >>



    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

  8. Re: ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration

    Hmmm... Adding a 10bT/2 media converter would also relieve the (probable)
    resistance/bottleneck I have at the bridged NICs. Ya' know, I searched a
    couple of years back for such a media converter, but could find none.
    Wound-up buying a used hub with 8x UTP and 1x BNC via e-Bay. Thanks for the
    links, help and explanations.



    "Lem" wrote:

    > Glad you got things working. You're correct. You bridged the two
    > networks and no longer are using ICS (or else you wouldn't have been
    > able to configure the IP address on your "ICS" NIC). However, the
    > Westell router itself provides NAT services, so your 10b2 computers (the
    > "ICS network") are protected by that -- at least from the Internet, but
    > not from the wireless laptops.
    >
    > If you wanted to spend a little $$, now that you're no longer using ICS,
    > perhaps you could get a 10base2 to 10baseT (bnc-to-UTP) converter and
    > connect your 10b2 coax to a LAN port on the router. That way, your "ICS
    > server" computer is just another client on your LAN and can be turned
    > off with no effect on the connectivity of the others.
    >
    > Examples only; no experience one way or the other with such products:
    > http://www.omnitron-systems.com/prod..._flexpoint.php
    > http://www.transition.com/Transition...=J/E-CX-TBT-02
    >
    > kahuna wrote:
    > > Thank you Lem (and Jack); I'll pursue that approach in the near future. For
    > > now, the epiphany you allude to (get 'em on the same subnet) and that I had
    > > late last night will suffice:
    > >
    > > Left DSL Modem/Router in control of DHCP and DNS (192.168.1.1)
    > >
    > > Set my "ICS" 10b2 NIC to 192.168.1.2, default gateway 192.168.1.1
    > >
    > > Let the "Router NIC" of my "ICS server" be configured by DSL Modem/Router DHCP
    > >
    > > Bridged the "Router" NIC and the "ICS" NIC.
    > >
    > > All PCs and wifi-laptops are now communicating and sharing. If I'm not
    > > mistaken, I still have a residual Internet-bottleneck on the 10b2 network (at
    > > the "ICS server"), but the wifi-laptops are independent of this.
    > > Unfortunately, I also no longer have the ICS/NAT protection that used to be
    > > afforded the 10b2 PCs.
    > >
    > >
    > > "Lem" wrote:
    > >
    > >> kahuna wrote:
    > >>> Thanks, but tried advice from EZLAN-link (plus permutations), to no avail.
    > >>> Perhaps my understanding of Access Point needs honing.
    > >>>
    > >>> As I understand µSoft ICS, it acts as a network address translator - e.g.,
    > >>> my 10b2 PCs are "seen" as one IP address by the outside world. I can ping
    > >>> and share resources of the wifi-DSL router-conneced laptops from any of the
    > >>> 10b2 PCs, but not vice-versa.
    > >>>
    > >>> 10b2 NIC of ICS server: 192.168.0.1
    > >>> Router NIC (of ICS server): DHCP configured (by DSL Router)
    > >>> Router: DHCP enabled; 192.168.1.1
    > >>>
    > >>> Any further suggestion would be appreciated.
    > >>>
    > >>> "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>> Hi
    > >>>> Make sure that the Wireless Router is connected and configured as an Access
    > >>>> Point.
    > >>>> The principle is described here,
    > >>>> http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    > >>>> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    > >>>>
    > >>>> "kahuna" wrote in message
    > >>>> news:9CC04F72-5F68-4795-900D-355B8B18458A@microsoft.com...
    > >>>>> Can't seem to find a configuration combination to allow WiFi router
    > >>>>> connected
    > >>>>> laptop to recognize ICS-connected resources - that is, I want to use a
    > >>>>> printer on one of my ICS-networked pcs from a wifi-router (DSL) connected
    > >>>>> laptop. Anyone got a match?...
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>> In more detail:
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>> ICS network, configured in a logical and physical bus topology, connected
    > >>>>> via separate NIC to a Westell 327W router, from which the hardwired
    > >>>>> network
    > >>>>> pcs obtain their Internet connectivity. n-Number of laptops
    > >>>>> wifi-connected
    > >>>>> to same router. ICS network pcs can "see" laptops, but laptops cannot
    > >>>>> "see"
    > >>>>> the pcs.
    > >>>>>
    > >>>>
    > >> You have two separate sub-nets. If you check the IP addresses of the
    > >> wifi connected laptops, you should see that that they are of the form
    > >> 192.168.1.x, as assigned by the router's DHCP server. Similarly, the
    > >> router's DHCP server should have assigned the NIC in your "ICS server"
    > >> to a similar IP address (you left that out of your post).
    > >>
    > >> On the other hand, if you check the IP addresses of the "ICS network"
    > >> computers, you should see that they are of the form 192.168.0.x, as
    > >> assigned by the ICS IP address allocator.
    > >>
    > >> One way of getting all of your computers to be able to share resources
    > >> with one another is to get them all on the same subnet. To do this,
    > >> disconnect the router from the broadband modem and instead connect the
    > >> broadband modem to the "router NIC" of your "ICS server" computer. Then
    > >> "configure the router as an access point." Basically, this means to
    > >> disable the router's DHCP server, set the router's _LAN facing_ IP
    > >> address to 192.168.0.x, and connect one of the router's _LAN_ ports to
    > >> your ICS network.
    > >>
    > >> I assume that you have some sort of switch connected to the "ICS NIC" to
    > >> which the "ICS network" computers are connected. By connecting the
    > >> router as described above, your are essentially adding a "wireless
    > >> switch" in parallel to your wired switch. All of the computers
    > >> connected either to the wireless switch (router as access point) or
    > >> wired switch will obtain addresses from the ICS allocator; all will be
    > >> of the form 192.168.0.x, and all will be able to share resources (once
    > >> you have set up file & printer sharing and dealt with permissions and
    > >> firewalls, of course).
    > >>
    > >> The main drawback to the above configuration is that it makes your "ICS
    > >> server" the bottleneck for ALL of your computers, including your wifi
    > >> laptops. You will have to leave this computer on in order for the wifi
    > >> laptops to access the Internet, whereas before you didn't have to.
    > >>
    > >> Essentially, what you are doing
    > >>
    > >> --
    > >> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    > >>
    > >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    > >>

    >
    >
    > --
    > Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >


  9. Re: ICS and DSL/WiFi Router Integration

    kahuna wrote:
    > Hmmm... Adding a 10bT/2 media converter would also relieve the (probable)
    > resistance/bottleneck I have at the bridged NICs. Ya' know, I searched a
    > couple of years back for such a media converter, but could find none.
    > Wound-up buying a used hub with 8x UTP and 1x BNC via e-Bay. Thanks for the
    > links, help and explanations.
    >
    >
    >
    > "Lem" wrote:
    >
    >> Glad you got things working. You're correct. You bridged the two
    >> networks and no longer are using ICS (or else you wouldn't have been
    >> able to configure the IP address on your "ICS" NIC). However, the
    >> Westell router itself provides NAT services, so your 10b2 computers (the
    >> "ICS network") are protected by that -- at least from the Internet, but
    >> not from the wireless laptops.
    >>
    >> If you wanted to spend a little $$, now that you're no longer using ICS,
    >> perhaps you could get a 10base2 to 10baseT (bnc-to-UTP) converter and
    >> connect your 10b2 coax to a LAN port on the router. That way, your "ICS
    >> server" computer is just another client on your LAN and can be turned
    >> off with no effect on the connectivity of the others.
    >>
    >> Examples only; no experience one way or the other with such products:
    >> http://www.omnitron-systems.com/prod..._flexpoint.php
    >> http://www.transition.com/Transition...=J/E-CX-TBT-02
    >>
    >> kahuna wrote:
    >>> Thank you Lem (and Jack); I'll pursue that approach in the near future. For
    >>> now, the epiphany you allude to (get 'em on the same subnet) and that I had
    >>> late last night will suffice:
    >>>
    >>> Left DSL Modem/Router in control of DHCP and DNS (192.168.1.1)
    >>>
    >>> Set my "ICS" 10b2 NIC to 192.168.1.2, default gateway 192.168.1.1
    >>>
    >>> Let the "Router NIC" of my "ICS server" be configured by DSL Modem/Router DHCP
    >>>
    >>> Bridged the "Router" NIC and the "ICS" NIC.
    >>>
    >>> All PCs and wifi-laptops are now communicating and sharing. If I'm not
    >>> mistaken, I still have a residual Internet-bottleneck on the 10b2 network (at
    >>> the "ICS server"), but the wifi-laptops are independent of this.
    >>> Unfortunately, I also no longer have the ICS/NAT protection that used to be
    >>> afforded the 10b2 PCs.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Lem" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> kahuna wrote:
    >>>>> Thanks, but tried advice from EZLAN-link (plus permutations), to no avail.
    >>>>> Perhaps my understanding of Access Point needs honing.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> As I understand µSoft ICS, it acts as a network address translator - e.g.,
    >>>>> my 10b2 PCs are "seen" as one IP address by the outside world. I can ping
    >>>>> and share resources of the wifi-DSL router-conneced laptops from any of the
    >>>>> 10b2 PCs, but not vice-versa.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> 10b2 NIC of ICS server: 192.168.0.1
    >>>>> Router NIC (of ICS server): DHCP configured (by DSL Router)
    >>>>> Router: DHCP enabled; 192.168.1.1
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Any further suggestion would be appreciated.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> Hi
    >>>>>> Make sure that the Wireless Router is connected and configured as an Access
    >>>>>> Point.
    >>>>>> The principle is described here,
    >>>>>> http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html
    >>>>>> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> "kahuna" wrote in message
    >>>>>> news:9CC04F72-5F68-4795-900D-355B8B18458A@microsoft.com...
    >>>>>>> Can't seem to find a configuration combination to allow WiFi router
    >>>>>>> connected
    >>>>>>> laptop to recognize ICS-connected resources - that is, I want to use a
    >>>>>>> printer on one of my ICS-networked pcs from a wifi-router (DSL) connected
    >>>>>>> laptop. Anyone got a match?...
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> In more detail:
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>>> ICS network, configured in a logical and physical bus topology, connected
    >>>>>>> via separate NIC to a Westell 327W router, from which the hardwired
    >>>>>>> network
    >>>>>>> pcs obtain their Internet connectivity. n-Number of laptops
    >>>>>>> wifi-connected
    >>>>>>> to same router. ICS network pcs can "see" laptops, but laptops cannot
    >>>>>>> "see"
    >>>>>>> the pcs.
    >>>>>>>
    >>>> You have two separate sub-nets. If you check the IP addresses of the
    >>>> wifi connected laptops, you should see that that they are of the form
    >>>> 192.168.1.x, as assigned by the router's DHCP server. Similarly, the
    >>>> router's DHCP server should have assigned the NIC in your "ICS server"
    >>>> to a similar IP address (you left that out of your post).
    >>>>
    >>>> On the other hand, if you check the IP addresses of the "ICS network"
    >>>> computers, you should see that they are of the form 192.168.0.x, as
    >>>> assigned by the ICS IP address allocator.
    >>>>
    >>>> One way of getting all of your computers to be able to share resources
    >>>> with one another is to get them all on the same subnet. To do this,
    >>>> disconnect the router from the broadband modem and instead connect the
    >>>> broadband modem to the "router NIC" of your "ICS server" computer. Then
    >>>> "configure the router as an access point." Basically, this means to
    >>>> disable the router's DHCP server, set the router's _LAN facing_ IP
    >>>> address to 192.168.0.x, and connect one of the router's _LAN_ ports to
    >>>> your ICS network.
    >>>>
    >>>> I assume that you have some sort of switch connected to the "ICS NIC" to
    >>>> which the "ICS network" computers are connected. By connecting the
    >>>> router as described above, your are essentially adding a "wireless
    >>>> switch" in parallel to your wired switch. All of the computers
    >>>> connected either to the wireless switch (router as access point) or
    >>>> wired switch will obtain addresses from the ICS allocator; all will be
    >>>> of the form 192.168.0.x, and all will be able to share resources (once
    >>>> you have set up file & printer sharing and dealt with permissions and
    >>>> firewalls, of course).
    >>>>
    >>>> The main drawback to the above configuration is that it makes your "ICS
    >>>> server" the bottleneck for ALL of your computers, including your wifi
    >>>> laptops. You will have to leave this computer on in order for the wifi
    >>>> laptops to access the Internet, whereas before you didn't have to.
    >>>>
    >>>> Essentially, what you are doing
    >>>>
    >>>> --
    >>>> Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking
    >>>>
    >>>> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >>>>

    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    >>

    YW.

    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

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