Wireless signal to another structure - Wireless

This is a discussion on Wireless signal to another structure - Wireless ; We have a building with various jacks throughout for computers. Shortly after the build, a Linksys WRT54G was added for wireless. So we have our HughesNet device plugged into the Linksys which then DHCPs the remainder of the building. There ...

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Thread: Wireless signal to another structure

  1. Wireless signal to another structure

    We have a building with various jacks throughout for computers. Shortly
    after the build, a Linksys WRT54G was added for wireless.

    So we have our HughesNet device plugged into the Linksys which then DHCPs
    the remainder of the building.

    There is a house not terribly far behind the building, approximately 200-300
    feet. We would like to project wireless signal to that house from the main
    building.

    We have in our possession three Netgear WG602s, which are Access Points.
    Can we connect the Access Point into one of the RJ45 jacks, configure it to
    the Linksys, and attach a Netgear ProSafe 14dBi directional Antenna (which
    will be mounted to the outside of the building, and pointed at the house) to
    direct wireless signal to the house?

    I am getting mixed signals from Netgear, and want to take advantage of the
    equipment we have, or ensure the proper equip is installed to save the
    homeowner some cash. He cannot get DSL or cable, and is not interested in
    the Hughes investment.

    Thanks in advance for any insight,

    Dan




  2. Re: Wireless signal to another structure

    Information wrote:
    > We have a building with various jacks throughout for computers. Shortly
    > after the build, a Linksys WRT54G was added for wireless.
    >
    > So we have our HughesNet device plugged into the Linksys which then DHCPs
    > the remainder of the building.
    >
    > There is a house not terribly far behind the building, approximately 200-300
    > feet. We would like to project wireless signal to that house from the main
    > building.
    >
    > We have in our possession three Netgear WG602s, which are Access Points.
    > Can we connect the Access Point into one of the RJ45 jacks, configure it to
    > the Linksys, and attach a Netgear ProSafe 14dBi directional Antenna (which
    > will be mounted to the outside of the building, and pointed at the house) to
    > direct wireless signal to the house?
    >
    > I am getting mixed signals from Netgear, and want to take advantage of the
    > equipment we have, or ensure the proper equip is installed to save the
    > homeowner some cash. He cannot get DSL or cable, and is not interested in
    > the Hughes investment.
    >
    > Thanks in advance for any insight,
    >
    > Dan
    >
    >
    >

    Definite maybe.

    Nominal range of 802.11g outdoors is around 110 meters. It would help
    if the user also had a directional antenna pointed back at your building
    on his wifi adapter. See http://www.ezlan.net/antennae.html

    Also http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html

    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

  3. Re: Wireless signal to another structure

    We are not obligated to the equipment we have, just trying to keep costs
    down.

    Should the WG602 be another device? We do not have anything in the house,
    yet. One thought from Netgear was to install one of the other WG602's at
    the house for access. This was then contradicted by another tech, which led
    me to here.

    Worst case, there may be a laptop at the house with an 802.11g, but we can
    certainly acquire something to span that distance.

    Recommendations?


    "Lem" wrote in message
    news:e%23pXyg8oHHA.2596@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    > Information wrote:
    >> We have a building with various jacks throughout for computers. Shortly
    >> after the build, a Linksys WRT54G was added for wireless.
    >>
    >> So we have our HughesNet device plugged into the Linksys which then DHCPs
    >> the remainder of the building.
    >>
    >> There is a house not terribly far behind the building, approximately
    >> 200-300 feet. We would like to project wireless signal to that house
    >> from the main building.
    >>
    >> We have in our possession three Netgear WG602s, which are Access Points.
    >> Can we connect the Access Point into one of the RJ45 jacks, configure it
    >> to the Linksys, and attach a Netgear ProSafe 14dBi directional Antenna
    >> (which will be mounted to the outside of the building, and pointed at the
    >> house) to direct wireless signal to the house?
    >>
    >> I am getting mixed signals from Netgear, and want to take advantage of
    >> the equipment we have, or ensure the proper equip is installed to save
    >> the homeowner some cash. He cannot get DSL or cable, and is not
    >> interested in the Hughes investment.
    >>
    >> Thanks in advance for any insight,
    >>
    >> Dan
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Definite maybe.
    >
    > Nominal range of 802.11g outdoors is around 110 meters. It would help if
    > the user also had a directional antenna pointed back at your building on
    > his wifi adapter. See http://www.ezlan.net/antennae.html
    >
    > Also http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html
    >
    > --
    > Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >
    > To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer




  4. Re: Wireless signal to another structure

    You have a lot of options, but because you already have several Netgear
    access points, why not just give it a try? Radio communication is very
    dependent on the particular environment in which the equipment is
    expected to operate. What counts is not opinions from "experts" or
    "techs," but what actually works for you.

    Here's what I would suggest you try:

    1. One WG602 configured as an Access Point and placed in front of a
    window facing the other building. See if your friend can connect to the
    network. If not,

    2. Connect the WG602 to your Netgear ProSafe 14dBi directional antenna
    mounted outside the house, and see if your friend can connect. If not,

    3. Configure the WG602 in your building to wireless bridge mode.
    Install a second WG602 also configured in wireless bridge mode in your
    friend's house and position it behind a window facing your building.
    Connect your friend's computer to his WG602 with an Ethernet cable. See
    if your friend can connect. If not,

    4. Install a second Netgear ProSafe 14dBi directional antenna mounted
    outside your friend's house and pointed at the antenna mounted on your
    building. Connect the second WG602 to this antenna. See if your friend
    can connect. If not,

    5. You will have to buy alternative hardware. At this point,
    experimenting becomes somewhat more expensive. You can either go to
    commercial-grade equipment (expensive) or you can try the BUFFALO
    WHR-HP-G54 and its associated high-gain antenna (Buffalo:
    http://tinyurl.com/ysjzo8; if you already have the Netgear antenna, that
    may or may not work with this unit). The advantage of the WHR-HP-G54 is
    that it has a built-in power amplifier. If you go this route, I'd
    suggest getting 2 of these and installing third-party (DD-WRT) firmware,
    which gives you even more control over the hardware's capabilities.
    http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

    As an aside, when I went to dd-wrt to get the link for you, I saw an
    interesting blurb about a new Buffalo product with "significantly better
    receiving sensitivity": http://www.dd-wrt.com/dd-wrtv2/index.php You
    might want to investigate this.

    Information wrote:
    > We are not obligated to the equipment we have, just trying to keep costs
    > down.
    >
    > Should the WG602 be another device? We do not have anything in the house,
    > yet. One thought from Netgear was to install one of the other WG602's at
    > the house for access. This was then contradicted by another tech, which led
    > me to here.
    >
    > Worst case, there may be a laptop at the house with an 802.11g, but we can
    > certainly acquire something to span that distance.
    >
    > Recommendations?
    >
    >
    > "Lem" wrote in message
    > news:e%23pXyg8oHHA.2596@TK2MSFTNGP06.phx.gbl...
    >> Information wrote:
    >>> We have a building with various jacks throughout for computers. Shortly
    >>> after the build, a Linksys WRT54G was added for wireless.
    >>>
    >>> So we have our HughesNet device plugged into the Linksys which then DHCPs
    >>> the remainder of the building.
    >>>
    >>> There is a house not terribly far behind the building, approximately
    >>> 200-300 feet. We would like to project wireless signal to that house
    >>> from the main building.
    >>>
    >>> We have in our possession three Netgear WG602s, which are Access Points.
    >>> Can we connect the Access Point into one of the RJ45 jacks, configure it
    >>> to the Linksys, and attach a Netgear ProSafe 14dBi directional Antenna
    >>> (which will be mounted to the outside of the building, and pointed at the
    >>> house) to direct wireless signal to the house?
    >>>
    >>> I am getting mixed signals from Netgear, and want to take advantage of
    >>> the equipment we have, or ensure the proper equip is installed to save
    >>> the homeowner some cash. He cannot get DSL or cable, and is not
    >>> interested in the Hughes investment.
    >>>
    >>> Thanks in advance for any insight,
    >>>
    >>> Dan
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Definite maybe.
    >>
    >> Nominal range of 802.11g outdoors is around 110 meters. It would help if
    >> the user also had a directional antenna pointed back at your building on
    >> his wifi adapter. See http://www.ezlan.net/antennae.html
    >>
    >> Also http://www.ezlan.net/Distance.html
    >>
    >> --
    >> Lem MS MVP -- Networking
    >>
    >> To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

    >
    >


    --
    Lem MS MVP -- Networking

    To the moon and back with 64 Kbits of RAM and 512 Kbits of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer

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