One laptop won't connect - "G" vs "N" compatibility? - Wireless

This is a discussion on One laptop won't connect - "G" vs "N" compatibility? - Wireless ; This is a wireless setup I'm making for my son: 1) a wired desktop (WinXP-SP2) with Linksys 160N router and RoadRunner cable; 2) two new Toshiba (Vista Home) wireless laptops (same model) with "N" capability; and 3) an older Toshiba ...

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Thread: One laptop won't connect - "G" vs "N" compatibility?

  1. One laptop won't connect - "G" vs "N" compatibility?

    This is a wireless setup I'm making for my son: 1) a wired desktop
    (WinXP-SP2) with Linksys 160N router and RoadRunner cable; 2) two new
    Toshiba (Vista Home) wireless laptops (same model) with "N" capability; and
    3) an older Toshiba laptop with "b/g" capability. The older Toshiba laptop
    was previously the only connection to the XP desktop with a LinkSys "G"
    model router and worked fine.

    When I installed the Linksys 160N router and connected the two new Toshibas
    they connected with no trouble, and printer sharing was obtained as well.
    When I setup the older Toshiba I couldn't even get an internet connection.
    I'm not really concerned about printer sharing for this laptop, but need the
    internet connection.

    The older laptop has a "Intel Pro/Wireless Network Connection 2200BG
    (802.11b/g)" card. Does the fact that this doesn't have "N" capability
    affect its communication with the Linksys 160N router? If so, is there some
    way to bridge this gap. This model is M55-S329. I'm really stumped, but
    that's kind of meaningless when it comes to wireless knowledge; I usually
    start out that way.



    From: "AdamE"
    Subject: Can't connect to certain web sites over wireless network
    Date: Tuesday, July 29, 2008 4:11 AM

    I'm having trouble getting one of my computers to access the internet
    via my wireless network. My first computer connected and accesses the
    web no problem. I installed the wireless dongle on my second computer
    no problem and it says that it connects with a strong signal. The
    problem I have is that for a number of web sites I try to connect via
    a browser and it eventually "times out" and says that it can't
    connect. The same web sites connect no problem over the wireless on
    the other computer. When I ran the XP utility to analyze my
    connection it came back as saying that it couldn't connect over http,
    https, or ftp and called out ports 80 and two others (135 I think and
    another I can't recall) saying I may be blocked via firewall. The
    Windows firewall was on but I couldn't turn it off because it was set
    via group policy (it was off on the other computer). I disabled the
    Windows firewall by:

    From the Start menu, select Run, then enter gpedit.msc.
    Expand the Computer Configuration folder, then the Administrative
    Templates folder.
    Expand the Network folder, then the Network Connections folder, then
    the Windows Firewall folder.
    Select the Standard Profile folder.
    Double-click the Windows Firewall: Protect all network connections
    option.
    Select Disabled, then click OK.
    Select the Domain Profile folder.
    Double-click the Windows Firewall: Protect all network connections
    option.
    Select Disabled, then click OK.
    Close the Group Policy dialog box.

    I confirmed the firewall was disabled but I still have the same
    problem. It seems like something is blocking the loading of certain
    sites but I can't figure out why - I can load my geocities home page
    and msn.com but when I go to my ISP's home page to check mail via the
    web it doesn't work, same with many other pages like eBay. Can anyone
    help?

    Adam


  2. Re: One laptop won't connect - "G" vs "N" compatibility?

    I apologize for posting on another's post. Had no idea this was happening.
    Really inept!

    "Gene Hora @san.rr.com>" wrote in message
    news:uFFqwtk8IHA.5596@TK2MSFTNGP02.phx.gbl...
    > This is a wireless setup I'm making for my son: 1) a wired desktop
    > (WinXP-SP2) with Linksys 160N router and RoadRunner cable; 2) two new
    > Toshiba (Vista Home) wireless laptops (same model) with "N" capability;
    > and 3) an older Toshiba laptop with "b/g" capability. The older Toshiba
    > laptop was previously the only connection to the XP desktop with a LinkSys
    > "G" model router and worked fine.
    >
    > When I installed the Linksys 160N router and connected the two new
    > Toshibas they connected with no trouble, and printer sharing was obtained
    > as well. When I setup the older Toshiba I couldn't even get an internet
    > connection. I'm not really concerned about printer sharing for this
    > laptop, but need the internet connection.
    >
    > The older laptop has a "Intel Pro/Wireless Network Connection 2200BG
    > (802.11b/g)" card. Does the fact that this doesn't have "N" capability
    > affect its communication with the Linksys 160N router? If so, is there
    > some way to bridge this gap. This model is M55-S329. I'm really stumped,
    > but that's kind of meaningless when it comes to wireless knowledge; I
    > usually start out that way.



  3. Re: One laptop won't connect - "G" vs "N" compatibility?

    Gene Hora
    > This is a wireless setup I'm making for my son: 1) a wired desktop
    > (WinXP-SP2) with Linksys 160N router and RoadRunner cable; 2) two new
    > Toshiba (Vista Home) wireless laptops (same model) with "N" capability;
    > and 3) an older Toshiba laptop with "b/g" capability. The older Toshiba
    > laptop was previously the only connection to the XP desktop with a
    > LinkSys "G" model router and worked fine.
    >
    > When I installed the Linksys 160N router and connected the two new
    > Toshibas they connected with no trouble, and printer sharing was
    > obtained as well. When I setup the older Toshiba I couldn't even get an
    > internet connection. I'm not really concerned about printer sharing for
    > this laptop, but need the internet connection.
    >
    > The older laptop has a "Intel Pro/Wireless Network Connection 2200BG
    > (802.11b/g)" card. Does the fact that this doesn't have "N" capability
    > affect its communication with the Linksys 160N router?

    No it should not, unless you explicitly set the router to N only mode.
    However, 2200 really shows it's age these days, it does not
    play well with WPA2.

    --PA

    >If so, is there
    > some way to bridge this gap. This model is M55-S329. I'm really stumped,
    > but that's kind of meaningless when it comes to wireless knowledge; I
    > usually start out that way.
    >


  4. Re: One laptop won't connect - "G" vs "N" compatibility?

    On Jul 30, 6:59*pm, "Pavel A." wrote:
    > Gene Hora
    > > This is a wireless setup I'm making for my son: *1) a wired desktop
    > > (WinXP-SP2) with Linksys 160N router and RoadRunner cable; 2) two new
    > > Toshiba (Vista Home) wireless laptops (same model) with "N" capability;
    > > and 3) an older Toshiba laptop with "b/g" capability. The older Toshiba
    > > laptop was previously the only connection to the XP desktop with a
    > > LinkSys "G" model router and worked fine.

    >
    > > When I installed the Linksys 160N router and connected the two new
    > > Toshibas they connected with no trouble, and printer sharing was
    > > obtained as well. When I setup the older Toshiba I couldn't even get an
    > > internet connection. I'm not really concerned about printer sharing for
    > > this laptop, but need the internet connection.

    >
    > > The older laptop has a "Intel Pro/Wireless Network Connection 2200BG
    > > (802.11b/g)" card. Does the fact that this doesn't have "N" capability
    > > affect its communication with the Linksys 160N router?

    >
    > No it should not, unless you explicitly set the router to N only mode.
    > However, 2200 really shows it's age these days, it does not
    > play well with WPA2.
    >
    > --PA
    >
    > >If so, is there
    > > some way to bridge this gap. This model is M55-S329. I'm really stumped,
    > > but that's kind of meaningless when it comes to wireless knowledge; I
    > > usually start out that way.


    Newer 11N (N) wireless adapters tend to expect WPA2 with AES
    encryption, to ensure the correct 300 Mbps access speeds. Most N
    wireless networks work on two frequencies (2.4 MHz and 5.0Mhz) but the
    most N routers can only work at one at a time. In order to get both
    frequencies to work at the same time, newer routers are coming to
    market, which permits the 2 frequencies to work at the same time. You
    may need to locate a "dual-band" router.

  5. Re: One laptop won't connect - "G" vs "N" compatibility?


    "smlunatick" wrote in message
    news:d209615f-67e3-4fb7-86ea-5139b74ebdae@a70g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
    On Jul 30, 6:59 pm, "Pavel A." wrote:
    > Gene Hora
    > > This is a wireless setup I'm making for my son: 1) a wired desktop
    > > (WinXP-SP2) with Linksys 160N router and RoadRunner cable; 2) two new
    > > Toshiba (Vista Home) wireless laptops (same model) with "N" capability;
    > > and 3) an older Toshiba laptop with "b/g" capability. The older Toshiba
    > > laptop was previously the only connection to the XP desktop with a
    > > LinkSys "G" model router and worked fine.

    >
    > > When I installed the Linksys 160N router and connected the two new
    > > Toshibas they connected with no trouble, and printer sharing was
    > > obtained as well. When I setup the older Toshiba I couldn't even get an
    > > internet connection. I'm not really concerned about printer sharing for
    > > this laptop, but need the internet connection.

    >
    > > The older laptop has a "Intel Pro/Wireless Network Connection 2200BG
    > > (802.11b/g)" card. Does the fact that this doesn't have "N" capability
    > > affect its communication with the Linksys 160N router?

    >
    > No it should not, unless you explicitly set the router to N only mode.
    > However, 2200 really shows it's age these days, it does not
    > play well with WPA2.
    >
    > --PA
    >
    > >If so, is there
    > > some way to bridge this gap. This model is M55-S329. I'm really stumped,
    > > but that's kind of meaningless when it comes to wireless knowledge; I
    > > usually start out that way.


    Newer 11N (N) wireless adapters tend to expect WPA2 with AES
    encryption, to ensure the correct 300 Mbps access speeds. Most N
    wireless networks work on two frequencies (2.4 MHz and 5.0Mhz) but the
    most N routers can only work at one at a time. In order to get both
    frequencies to work at the same time, newer routers are coming to
    market, which permits the 2 frequencies to work at the same time. You
    may need to locate a "dual-band" router.

    Thanks for that response -- very helpful. That's new information for me.
    I'll look into the "dual-band" routers and then have to decide if that older
    laptop is really worth the trouble and expense.


  6. Re: One laptop won't connect - "G" vs "N" compatibility?

    On Jul 31, 10:20*pm, "Gene Hora" @san.rr.com>
    wrote:
    > "smlunatick" wrote in message
    >
    > news:d209615f-67e3-4fb7-86ea-5139b74ebdae@a70g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
    > On Jul 30, 6:59 pm, "Pavel A." wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Gene Hora
    > > > This is a wireless setup I'm making for my son: 1) a wired desktop
    > > > (WinXP-SP2) with Linksys 160N router and RoadRunner cable; 2) two new
    > > > Toshiba (Vista Home) wireless laptops (same model) with "N" capability;
    > > > and 3) an older Toshiba laptop with "b/g" capability. The older Toshiba
    > > > laptop was previously the only connection to the XP desktop with a
    > > > LinkSys "G" model router and worked fine.

    >
    > > > When I installed the Linksys 160N router and connected the two new
    > > > Toshibas they connected with no trouble, and printer sharing was
    > > > obtained as well. When I setup the older Toshiba I couldn't even get an
    > > > internet connection. I'm not really concerned about printer sharing for
    > > > this laptop, but need the internet connection.

    >
    > > > The older laptop has a "Intel Pro/Wireless Network Connection 2200BG
    > > > (802.11b/g)" card. Does the fact that this doesn't have "N" capability
    > > > affect its communication with the Linksys 160N router?

    >
    > > No it should not, unless you explicitly set the router to N only mode.
    > > However, 2200 really shows it's age these days, it does not
    > > play well with WPA2.

    >
    > > --PA

    >
    > > >If so, is there
    > > > some way to bridge this gap. This model is M55-S329. I'm really stumped,
    > > > but that's kind of meaningless when it comes to wireless knowledge; I
    > > > usually start out that way.

    >
    > Newer 11N (N) wireless adapters tend to expect WPA2 with AES
    > encryption, to ensure the correct 300 Mbps access speeds. *Most N
    > wireless networks work on two frequencies (2.4 MHz and 5.0Mhz) but the
    > most N routers can only work at one at a time. * In order to get both
    > frequencies to work at the same time, newer routers are coming to
    > market, which permits the 2 frequencies to work at the same time. *You
    > may need to locate a "dual-band" router.
    >
    > Thanks for that response -- very helpful. That's new information for me.
    > I'll look into the "dual-band" routers and then have to decide if that older
    > laptop is really worth the trouble and expense.

    You can also possibly delay the replacing of the older laptop by
    adding a separate 11n adapter to it. There are USB and CardBus /
    PCMCIA adapters.

  7. RE: One laptop won't connect - "G" vs "N" compatibility?

    I am writing this letter to ALL Wireless Router manufacturers.
    I have a Linksys Wireless Router Model:BEFW11S4. It is 7 years (yes, count
    them, all of seven little years) old. I have visited the Linksys website
    numerous times trying to set up the WEP/WPA security on that wireless router
    (as all responsible wireless router owners should!). I found that there are
    no links to any wireless router setting websites that are congruent with the
    screen shots from Linksys' own self help technical support site. I have had
    to call Linksys several times to resolve this issue only to be placed on hold
    for lengthy times (sometimes my call was dropped and I had to start over ....
    how sad for such a large company to have such poorly trained phone
    receptionists!), then be transferred (see previous comment about the phone
    receptionists) to a supposed supervisor, only to finally be transferred to
    someone who tells me that the warranty has expired and wants me to pay $40.00
    for the technical support to do the right thing that I want and need to do.
    First, the device works fine (as evidenced by this e-mail that you have
    just received)!
    Second, why should I have to pay for doing the right thing?
    Third, if I am going to be EXTORTED into buying a new wireless router so
    that I can do the right thing and set up an encryption key for a secure
    network, what on Gods' Green Earth makes anyone think that I would CHOOSE to
    buy another Linksys product when ALL that I have ever received from them is a
    functional wireless router (yes, even after seven whole years) and the
    crappiest Customer Service/Technical Support I have ever had the displeasure
    to encounter!
    I shall copy this letter and try to find as many Chat Rooms as possible in
    order to spread the word of ALL that I have gone through with the Chain of
    Command at the Linksys phone center, well above and beyond what any
    reasonable person should expect to go through, and still have NO RELIEF
    concerning my singular issue with their product and its capabilities that I
    SHOULD be able to enjoy as the owner of said product! What has happend to
    "The Customer Is Always Right" Customer Service mantra (I can't say "In
    America" because the call was handled in India)? Is the Customer, the ones
    that makes the company what it is through the purchase of products, so
    worthless to the company that they can just be treated with abject contempt
    and scorn? Is the Customer to thus be trampled underfoot? Are we paying to
    be so abused? I, for one (yes, one, the beginning of all), shall NOT be
    treated in such manner, and CERTAINLY shall NOT PAY to be treated as such!
    In this world of expanding technologies, it shall be those with the
    GREATEST Customer Appeal that shall continue to be found worthwile in the
    publics' eyes (and pocketbooks) and shall grow to meet the demands of a
    growing world - ESPECIALLY in the Electronics Department!
    It is now my strongest desire that the Linksys Corporation suffers
    irreparable damage and goes out of business for their Crappy Customer
    Service! I can only hope that I reach enough people around the world to bring
    this desire true!

    "Gene Hora @san.rr.com>" wrote:

    > This is a wireless setup I'm making for my son: 1) a wired desktop
    > (WinXP-SP2) with Linksys 160N router and RoadRunner cable; 2) two new
    > Toshiba (Vista Home) wireless laptops (same model) with "N" capability; and
    > 3) an older Toshiba laptop with "b/g" capability. The older Toshiba laptop
    > was previously the only connection to the XP desktop with a LinkSys "G"
    > model router and worked fine.
    >
    > When I installed the Linksys 160N router and connected the two new Toshibas
    > they connected with no trouble, and printer sharing was obtained as well.
    > When I setup the older Toshiba I couldn't even get an internet connection.
    > I'm not really concerned about printer sharing for this laptop, but need the
    > internet connection.
    >
    > The older laptop has a "Intel Pro/Wireless Network Connection 2200BG
    > (802.11b/g)" card. Does the fact that this doesn't have "N" capability
    > affect its communication with the Linksys 160N router? If so, is there some
    > way to bridge this gap. This model is M55-S329. I'm really stumped, but
    > that's kind of meaningless when it comes to wireless knowledge; I usually
    > start out that way.
    >
    >
    >
    > From: "AdamE"
    > Subject: Can't connect to certain web sites over wireless network
    > Date: Tuesday, July 29, 2008 4:11 AM
    >
    > I'm having trouble getting one of my computers to access the internet
    > via my wireless network. My first computer connected and accesses the
    > web no problem. I installed the wireless dongle on my second computer
    > no problem and it says that it connects with a strong signal. The
    > problem I have is that for a number of web sites I try to connect via
    > a browser and it eventually "times out" and says that it can't
    > connect. The same web sites connect no problem over the wireless on
    > the other computer. When I ran the XP utility to analyze my
    > connection it came back as saying that it couldn't connect over http,
    > https, or ftp and called out ports 80 and two others (135 I think and
    > another I can't recall) saying I may be blocked via firewall. The
    > Windows firewall was on but I couldn't turn it off because it was set
    > via group policy (it was off on the other computer). I disabled the
    > Windows firewall by:
    >
    > From the Start menu, select Run, then enter gpedit.msc.
    > Expand the Computer Configuration folder, then the Administrative
    > Templates folder.
    > Expand the Network folder, then the Network Connections folder, then
    > the Windows Firewall folder.
    > Select the Standard Profile folder.
    > Double-click the Windows Firewall: Protect all network connections
    > option.
    > Select Disabled, then click OK.
    > Select the Domain Profile folder.
    > Double-click the Windows Firewall: Protect all network connections
    > option.
    > Select Disabled, then click OK.
    > Close the Group Policy dialog box.
    >
    > I confirmed the firewall was disabled but I still have the same
    > problem. It seems like something is blocking the loading of certain
    > sites but I can't figure out why - I can load my geocities home page
    > and msn.com but when I go to my ISP's home page to check mail via the
    > web it doesn't work, same with many other pages like eBay. Can anyone
    > help?
    >
    > Adam
    >
    >


  8. Re: One laptop won't connect - "G" vs "N" compatibility?

    I am writing this letter to ALL Wireless Router manufacturers.
    I have a Linksys Wireless Router Model:BEFW11S4. It is 7 years (yes, count
    them, all of seven little years) old. I have visited the Linksys website
    numerous times trying to set up the WEP/WPA security on that wireless router
    (as all responsible wireless router owners should!). I found that there are
    no links to any wireless router setting websites that are congruent with the
    screen shots from Linksys' own self help technical support site. I have had
    to call Linksys several times to resolve this issue only to be placed on hold
    for lengthy times (sometimes my call was dropped and I had to start over ....
    how sad for such a large company to have such poorly trained phone
    receptionists!), then be transferred (see previous comment about the phone
    receptionists) to a supposed supervisor, only to finally be transferred to
    someone who tells me that the warranty has expired and wants me to pay $40.00
    for the technical support to do the right thing that I want and need to do.
    First, the device works fine (as evidenced by this e-mail that you have
    just received)!
    Second, why should I have to pay for doing the right thing?
    Third, if I am going to be EXTORTED into buying a new wireless router so
    that I can do the right thing and set up an encryption key for a secure
    network, what on Gods' Green Earth makes anyone think that I would CHOOSE to
    buy another Linksys product when ALL that I have ever received from them is a
    functional wireless router (yes, even after seven whole years) and the
    crappiest Customer Service/Technical Support I have ever had the displeasure
    to encounter!
    I shall copy this letter and try to find as many Chat Rooms as possible in
    order to spread the word of ALL that I have gone through with the Chain of
    Command at the Linksys phone center, well above and beyond what any
    reasonable person should expect to go through, and still have NO RELIEF
    concerning my singular issue with their product and its capabilities that I
    SHOULD be able to enjoy as the owner of said product! What has happend to
    "The Customer Is Always Right" Customer Service mantra (I can't say "In
    America" because the call was handled in India)? Is the Customer, the ones
    that makes the company what it is through the purchase of products, so
    worthless to the company that they can just be treated with abject contempt
    and scorn? Is the Customer to thus be trampled underfoot? Are we paying to
    be so abused? I, for one (yes, one, the beginning of all), shall NOT be
    treated in such manner, and CERTAINLY shall NOT PAY to be treated as such!
    In this world of expanding technologies, it shall be those with the
    GREATEST Customer Appeal that shall continue to be found worthwile in the
    publics' eyes (and pocketbooks) and shall grow to meet the demands of a
    growing world - ESPECIALLY in the Electronics Department!
    It is now my strongest desire that the Linksys Corporation suffers
    irreparable damage and goes out of business for their Crappy Customer
    Service! I can only hope that I reach enough people around the world to bring
    this desire true!

    "smlunatick" wrote:

    > On Jul 30, 6:59 pm, "Pavel A." wrote:
    > > Gene Hora
    > > > This is a wireless setup I'm making for my son: 1) a wired desktop
    > > > (WinXP-SP2) with Linksys 160N router and RoadRunner cable; 2) two new
    > > > Toshiba (Vista Home) wireless laptops (same model) with "N" capability;
    > > > and 3) an older Toshiba laptop with "b/g" capability. The older Toshiba
    > > > laptop was previously the only connection to the XP desktop with a
    > > > LinkSys "G" model router and worked fine.

    > >
    > > > When I installed the Linksys 160N router and connected the two new
    > > > Toshibas they connected with no trouble, and printer sharing was
    > > > obtained as well. When I setup the older Toshiba I couldn't even get an
    > > > internet connection. I'm not really concerned about printer sharing for
    > > > this laptop, but need the internet connection.

    > >
    > > > The older laptop has a "Intel Pro/Wireless Network Connection 2200BG
    > > > (802.11b/g)" card. Does the fact that this doesn't have "N" capability
    > > > affect its communication with the Linksys 160N router?

    > >
    > > No it should not, unless you explicitly set the router to N only mode.
    > > However, 2200 really shows it's age these days, it does not
    > > play well with WPA2.
    > >
    > > --PA
    > >
    > > >If so, is there
    > > > some way to bridge this gap. This model is M55-S329. I'm really stumped,
    > > > but that's kind of meaningless when it comes to wireless knowledge; I
    > > > usually start out that way.

    >
    > Newer 11N (N) wireless adapters tend to expect WPA2 with AES
    > encryption, to ensure the correct 300 Mbps access speeds. Most N
    > wireless networks work on two frequencies (2.4 MHz and 5.0Mhz) but the
    > most N routers can only work at one at a time. In order to get both
    > frequencies to work at the same time, newer routers are coming to
    > market, which permits the 2 frequencies to work at the same time. You
    > may need to locate a "dual-band" router.
    >

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