Wireless networking slow when encrypted - Wireless

This is a discussion on Wireless networking slow when encrypted - Wireless ; I have a strange and persistent problem that no-one (including paid-for Microsoft Technicians) seem to be able to solve. I have an HP Pavilion laptop running WIndows XP Home SP2 equipped with both wired and wireless network adapters. The machine ...

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Thread: Wireless networking slow when encrypted

  1. Wireless networking slow when encrypted

    I have a strange and persistent problem that no-one (including paid-for
    Microsoft Technicians) seem to be able to solve.

    I have an HP Pavilion laptop running WIndows XP Home SP2 equipped with both
    wired and wireless network adapters. The machine is fully updated and void
    of any malware\spyware or viruses.

    When connected to the network via the wired connection the through-put is
    fine.
    When connected to an un-secured (no WEP, WPA, etc) the through-put is
    slower, but definitely usable.
    When connected to a secured wireless network, throughput slows to an
    absolute crawl (less than 1kb\second).

    I've tried replacing the internal wireless card with a similar adapter and
    get the same results.
    I've tried removing the internal adapter, installing a PCMCIA based Wireless
    adapter, and get the same exact results.

    The problem seems related to the encryped networks. My question is what
    software\component of Windows handles wireless encryption. Can this be
    corrupt? Can it be replaced, updated?

    I'm at a total loss at explaining this, and needless to say my customer is a
    bit miffed (as am I with the apparently clueless tech support I've gotten
    through paid Microsoft support).

    Anyone have any ideas? Suggestions?

  2. Re: Wireless networking slow when encrypted

    Hi
    Old WEP use to slow down Wireless.
    WPA/WPA2 affect is negligible.
    What is your Wireless source and its Speed?
    If it is really much slower than the "Speed" expected without encryption,
    then it indicates some general problem with the Wireless, and has to be
    dealt with first.
    As a frame of reference, http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "VReggie" wrote in message
    news:80865D9E-11DF-4838-A9A4-109A8FAC91C2@microsoft.com...
    >I have a strange and persistent problem that no-one (including paid-for
    > Microsoft Technicians) seem to be able to solve.
    >
    > I have an HP Pavilion laptop running WIndows XP Home SP2 equipped with
    > both
    > wired and wireless network adapters. The machine is fully updated and
    > void
    > of any malware\spyware or viruses.
    >
    > When connected to the network via the wired connection the through-put is
    > fine.
    > When connected to an un-secured (no WEP, WPA, etc) the through-put is
    > slower, but definitely usable.
    > When connected to a secured wireless network, throughput slows to an
    > absolute crawl (less than 1kb\second).
    >
    > I've tried replacing the internal wireless card with a similar adapter and
    > get the same results.
    > I've tried removing the internal adapter, installing a PCMCIA based
    > Wireless
    > adapter, and get the same exact results.
    >
    > The problem seems related to the encryped networks. My question is what
    > software\component of Windows handles wireless encryption. Can this be
    > corrupt? Can it be replaced, updated?
    >
    > I'm at a total loss at explaining this, and needless to say my customer is
    > a
    > bit miffed (as am I with the apparently clueless tech support I've gotten
    > through paid Microsoft support).
    >
    > Anyone have any ideas? Suggestions?



  3. Re: Wireless networking slow when encrypted

    I have two sources of wireless in my facility, one running WEP (for
    compatibility with various clients) and one running WPA.

    One AP is a Verizon supplied ActionTec MI424WR running WEP, the other is a
    LinkSys WRT300N running WPA. I connect to these APs with literally hundreds
    of other client's machines, of varying setups, ages and OSes. I've never had
    this particularly exaggerated problem with any machine until now.

    Connecting to either encrypted network results in throughput so slow it's
    un-usable. The speeds vary from 36kb\second down to 1 byte\second.

    If I setup an unsecured network and connect to that it works as I'd expect a
    wireless network should; a tad slower, but very usable.

    "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:

    > Hi
    > Old WEP use to slow down Wireless.
    > WPA/WPA2 affect is negligible.
    > What is your Wireless source and its Speed?
    > If it is really much slower than the "Speed" expected without encryption,
    > then it indicates some general problem with the Wireless, and has to be
    > dealt with first.
    > As a frame of reference, http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >
    > "VReggie" wrote in message
    > news:80865D9E-11DF-4838-A9A4-109A8FAC91C2@microsoft.com...
    > >I have a strange and persistent problem that no-one (including paid-for
    > > Microsoft Technicians) seem to be able to solve.
    > >
    > > I have an HP Pavilion laptop running WIndows XP Home SP2 equipped with
    > > both
    > > wired and wireless network adapters. The machine is fully updated and
    > > void
    > > of any malware\spyware or viruses.
    > >
    > > When connected to the network via the wired connection the through-put is
    > > fine.
    > > When connected to an un-secured (no WEP, WPA, etc) the through-put is
    > > slower, but definitely usable.
    > > When connected to a secured wireless network, throughput slows to an
    > > absolute crawl (less than 1kb\second).
    > >
    > > I've tried replacing the internal wireless card with a similar adapter and
    > > get the same results.
    > > I've tried removing the internal adapter, installing a PCMCIA based
    > > Wireless
    > > adapter, and get the same exact results.
    > >
    > > The problem seems related to the encryped networks. My question is what
    > > software\component of Windows handles wireless encryption. Can this be
    > > corrupt? Can it be replaced, updated?
    > >
    > > I'm at a total loss at explaining this, and needless to say my customer is
    > > a
    > > bit miffed (as am I with the apparently clueless tech support I've gotten
    > > through paid Microsoft support).
    > >
    > > Anyone have any ideas? Suggestions?

    >
    >


  4. Re: Wireless networking slow when encrypted

    Hi
    At this point I would reinstall Windows, if it does not help (given that
    millions of Wireless Laptop work well with windows). I would assume that
    there is some thing inherent in the Laptop Hardware that creates this
    problem.
    There are options like sending back the Laptop to the manufacturer, or
    buying very expensive tools to do a real technical analysis of the situation
    (Fluke sells a lot of hardware that is related to Networking and wireless
    network's operation analysis).
    However I see situations like this as more as a Psychological issue, many
    people/clients that are used to "old days technology" have difficulties to
    adjust to 21st commodity technology.
    As you probably know there are many problems involving computers that at a
    certain point spending many hours to try to "fix" them is more expensive
    than buying another device. Since computers are Not People but mainly pieces
    of Plastic and Silicone, replacing or not is only an economical decision.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "VReggie" wrote in message
    news:6C05736C-2856-40C3-B457-5F0DCCB3EF0A@microsoft.com...
    >I have two sources of wireless in my facility, one running WEP (for
    > compatibility with various clients) and one running WPA.
    >
    > One AP is a Verizon supplied ActionTec MI424WR running WEP, the other is a
    > LinkSys WRT300N running WPA. I connect to these APs with literally
    > hundreds
    > of other client's machines, of varying setups, ages and OSes. I've never
    > had
    > this particularly exaggerated problem with any machine until now.
    >
    > Connecting to either encrypted network results in throughput so slow it's
    > un-usable. The speeds vary from 36kb\second down to 1 byte\second.
    >
    > If I setup an unsecured network and connect to that it works as I'd expect
    > a
    > wireless network should; a tad slower, but very usable.
    >
    > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    >
    >> Hi
    >> Old WEP use to slow down Wireless.
    >> WPA/WPA2 affect is negligible.
    >> What is your Wireless source and its Speed?
    >> If it is really much slower than the "Speed" expected without encryption,
    >> then it indicates some general problem with the Wireless, and has to be
    >> dealt with first.
    >> As a frame of reference, http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
    >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >>
    >> "VReggie" wrote in message
    >> news:80865D9E-11DF-4838-A9A4-109A8FAC91C2@microsoft.com...
    >> >I have a strange and persistent problem that no-one (including paid-for
    >> > Microsoft Technicians) seem to be able to solve.
    >> >
    >> > I have an HP Pavilion laptop running WIndows XP Home SP2 equipped with
    >> > both
    >> > wired and wireless network adapters. The machine is fully updated and
    >> > void
    >> > of any malware\spyware or viruses.
    >> >
    >> > When connected to the network via the wired connection the through-put
    >> > is
    >> > fine.
    >> > When connected to an un-secured (no WEP, WPA, etc) the through-put is
    >> > slower, but definitely usable.
    >> > When connected to a secured wireless network, throughput slows to an
    >> > absolute crawl (less than 1kb\second).
    >> >
    >> > I've tried replacing the internal wireless card with a similar adapter
    >> > and
    >> > get the same results.
    >> > I've tried removing the internal adapter, installing a PCMCIA based
    >> > Wireless
    >> > adapter, and get the same exact results.
    >> >
    >> > The problem seems related to the encryped networks. My question is
    >> > what
    >> > software\component of Windows handles wireless encryption. Can this be
    >> > corrupt? Can it be replaced, updated?
    >> >
    >> > I'm at a total loss at explaining this, and needless to say my customer
    >> > is
    >> > a
    >> > bit miffed (as am I with the apparently clueless tech support I've
    >> > gotten
    >> > through paid Microsoft support).
    >> >
    >> > Anyone have any ideas? Suggestions?

    >>
    >>



  5. Re: Wireless networking slow when encrypted

    Reinstalling XP has crossed my mind, however the client does not have her OS
    software CD (as usual).

    Even a simple XP Repair install would have been something I'd have tried,
    had she brought her system's OS CDs with her.

    And, unfortunately, simply reinstalling her OS isn't always as easy as we
    think, at least from the end user's perspective. Rarely do they have their
    original application CDs, or are they even aware of what applications they
    had or were using on a daily basis.

    It all adds up to a lot of work for me, an unhappy customer on top of that
    and yet one more person leaning towards the Macintosh experience.

    "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:

    > Hi
    > At this point I would reinstall Windows, if it does not help (given that
    > millions of Wireless Laptop work well with windows). I would assume that
    > there is some thing inherent in the Laptop Hardware that creates this
    > problem.
    > There are options like sending back the Laptop to the manufacturer, or
    > buying very expensive tools to do a real technical analysis of the situation
    > (Fluke sells a lot of hardware that is related to Networking and wireless
    > network's operation analysis).
    > However I see situations like this as more as a Psychological issue, many
    > people/clients that are used to "old days technology" have difficulties to
    > adjust to 21st commodity technology.
    > As you probably know there are many problems involving computers that at a
    > certain point spending many hours to try to "fix" them is more expensive
    > than buying another device. Since computers are Not People but mainly pieces
    > of Plastic and Silicone, replacing or not is only an economical decision.
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >
    > "VReggie" wrote in message
    > news:6C05736C-2856-40C3-B457-5F0DCCB3EF0A@microsoft.com...
    > >I have two sources of wireless in my facility, one running WEP (for
    > > compatibility with various clients) and one running WPA.
    > >
    > > One AP is a Verizon supplied ActionTec MI424WR running WEP, the other is a
    > > LinkSys WRT300N running WPA. I connect to these APs with literally
    > > hundreds
    > > of other client's machines, of varying setups, ages and OSes. I've never
    > > had
    > > this particularly exaggerated problem with any machine until now.
    > >
    > > Connecting to either encrypted network results in throughput so slow it's
    > > un-usable. The speeds vary from 36kb\second down to 1 byte\second.
    > >
    > > If I setup an unsecured network and connect to that it works as I'd expect
    > > a
    > > wireless network should; a tad slower, but very usable.
    > >
    > > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    > >
    > >> Hi
    > >> Old WEP use to slow down Wireless.
    > >> WPA/WPA2 affect is negligible.
    > >> What is your Wireless source and its Speed?
    > >> If it is really much slower than the "Speed" expected without encryption,
    > >> then it indicates some general problem with the Wireless, and has to be
    > >> dealt with first.
    > >> As a frame of reference, http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
    > >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    > >>
    > >> "VReggie" wrote in message
    > >> news:80865D9E-11DF-4838-A9A4-109A8FAC91C2@microsoft.com...
    > >> >I have a strange and persistent problem that no-one (including paid-for
    > >> > Microsoft Technicians) seem to be able to solve.
    > >> >
    > >> > I have an HP Pavilion laptop running WIndows XP Home SP2 equipped with
    > >> > both
    > >> > wired and wireless network adapters. The machine is fully updated and
    > >> > void
    > >> > of any malware\spyware or viruses.
    > >> >
    > >> > When connected to the network via the wired connection the through-put
    > >> > is
    > >> > fine.
    > >> > When connected to an un-secured (no WEP, WPA, etc) the through-put is
    > >> > slower, but definitely usable.
    > >> > When connected to a secured wireless network, throughput slows to an
    > >> > absolute crawl (less than 1kb\second).
    > >> >
    > >> > I've tried replacing the internal wireless card with a similar adapter
    > >> > and
    > >> > get the same results.
    > >> > I've tried removing the internal adapter, installing a PCMCIA based
    > >> > Wireless
    > >> > adapter, and get the same exact results.
    > >> >
    > >> > The problem seems related to the encryped networks. My question is
    > >> > what
    > >> > software\component of Windows handles wireless encryption. Can this be
    > >> > corrupt? Can it be replaced, updated?
    > >> >
    > >> > I'm at a total loss at explaining this, and needless to say my customer
    > >> > is
    > >> > a
    > >> > bit miffed (as am I with the apparently clueless tech support I've
    > >> > gotten
    > >> > through paid Microsoft support).
    > >> >
    > >> > Anyone have any ideas? Suggestions?
    > >>
    > >>

    >
    >


  6. Re: Wireless networking slow when encrypted

    For anyone following this, here is what I've done and found;

    I tried a repair install of Windows XP (I've had luck with this before), but
    this didn't help a bit.

    I then reformatted and re-installed Windows (after imaging the client's drive)
    and reinstalled just the basic driver set (wireed and wireless NIC). I
    used an PCMCIA wireless adapter.

    Connecting to a WEP encrypted network was as slow as before. I connected to
    my WPA encrypted network and VIOLA, the throughput reached speeds of
    346KB/sec.

    Jack was spot on with his assesment of WEP (and considering this heap is a
    Celeron 2.8GHz maybe the WEP encryption is just too much for it to handle.

    My problem now is convincing the client to change their router to WPA. I've
    run into situations where just the opposite occurs, where some clients cannot
    connect to a WPA network.

    I'll work with the images and various installs I have to hopefully get a
    more suitable answer for my client, but as of now I at least have been
    rewarded with some progress on this issue.

    Thanks for the time, Jack, and I would encourage anyone with any ideas to
    chime in.
    "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:

    > Hi
    > At this point I would reinstall Windows, if it does not help (given that
    > millions of Wireless Laptop work well with windows). I would assume that
    > there is some thing inherent in the Laptop Hardware that creates this
    > problem.
    > There are options like sending back the Laptop to the manufacturer, or
    > buying very expensive tools to do a real technical analysis of the situation
    > (Fluke sells a lot of hardware that is related to Networking and wireless
    > network's operation analysis).
    > However I see situations like this as more as a Psychological issue, many
    > people/clients that are used to "old days technology" have difficulties to
    > adjust to 21st commodity technology.
    > As you probably know there are many problems involving computers that at a
    > certain point spending many hours to try to "fix" them is more expensive
    > than buying another device. Since computers are Not People but mainly pieces
    > of Plastic and Silicone, replacing or not is only an economical decision.
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >
    > "VReggie" wrote in message
    > news:6C05736C-2856-40C3-B457-5F0DCCB3EF0A@microsoft.com...
    > >I have two sources of wireless in my facility, one running WEP (for
    > > compatibility with various clients) and one running WPA.
    > >
    > > One AP is a Verizon supplied ActionTec MI424WR running WEP, the other is a
    > > LinkSys WRT300N running WPA. I connect to these APs with literally
    > > hundreds
    > > of other client's machines, of varying setups, ages and OSes. I've never
    > > had
    > > this particularly exaggerated problem with any machine until now.
    > >
    > > Connecting to either encrypted network results in throughput so slow it's
    > > un-usable. The speeds vary from 36kb\second down to 1 byte\second.
    > >
    > > If I setup an unsecured network and connect to that it works as I'd expect
    > > a
    > > wireless network should; a tad slower, but very usable.
    > >
    > > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    > >
    > >> Hi
    > >> Old WEP use to slow down Wireless.
    > >> WPA/WPA2 affect is negligible.
    > >> What is your Wireless source and its Speed?
    > >> If it is really much slower than the "Speed" expected without encryption,
    > >> then it indicates some general problem with the Wireless, and has to be
    > >> dealt with first.
    > >> As a frame of reference, http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
    > >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    > >>
    > >> "VReggie" wrote in message
    > >> news:80865D9E-11DF-4838-A9A4-109A8FAC91C2@microsoft.com...
    > >> >I have a strange and persistent problem that no-one (including paid-for
    > >> > Microsoft Technicians) seem to be able to solve.
    > >> >
    > >> > I have an HP Pavilion laptop running WIndows XP Home SP2 equipped with
    > >> > both
    > >> > wired and wireless network adapters. The machine is fully updated and
    > >> > void
    > >> > of any malware\spyware or viruses.
    > >> >
    > >> > When connected to the network via the wired connection the through-put
    > >> > is
    > >> > fine.
    > >> > When connected to an un-secured (no WEP, WPA, etc) the through-put is
    > >> > slower, but definitely usable.
    > >> > When connected to a secured wireless network, throughput slows to an
    > >> > absolute crawl (less than 1kb\second).
    > >> >
    > >> > I've tried replacing the internal wireless card with a similar adapter
    > >> > and
    > >> > get the same results.
    > >> > I've tried removing the internal adapter, installing a PCMCIA based
    > >> > Wireless
    > >> > adapter, and get the same exact results.
    > >> >
    > >> > The problem seems related to the encryped networks. My question is
    > >> > what
    > >> > software\component of Windows handles wireless encryption. Can this be
    > >> > corrupt? Can it be replaced, updated?
    > >> >
    > >> > I'm at a total loss at explaining this, and needless to say my customer
    > >> > is
    > >> > a
    > >> > bit miffed (as am I with the apparently clueless tech support I've
    > >> > gotten
    > >> > through paid Microsoft support).
    > >> >
    > >> > Anyone have any ideas? Suggestions?
    > >>
    > >>

    >
    >


  7. Re: Wireless networking slow when encrypted

    Hi
    May be explaining to the client that WEP can be broken in 5min. would
    convince her.
    In addition it is important to explain to the person that security Broken is
    not just a matter of logging to the one system or stealing little Internet
    Bandwidth. The Hacker can sniff info from the signal in the air and the
    victim does not even know about it.
    http://hardware.slashdot.org/article.../04/03/2116239
    In addition a new Wireless Router that can do WPA can be found for $30 which
    less then the value of one hour technical work.
    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "VReggie" wrote in message
    news:B9BB74DA-A25A-4885-826B-405FC63E776E@microsoft.com...
    > For anyone following this, here is what I've done and found;
    >
    > I tried a repair install of Windows XP (I've had luck with this before),
    > but
    > this didn't help a bit.
    >
    > I then reformatted and re-installed Windows (after imaging the client's
    > drive)
    > and reinstalled just the basic driver set (wireed and wireless NIC). I
    > used an PCMCIA wireless adapter.
    >
    > Connecting to a WEP encrypted network was as slow as before. I connected
    > to
    > my WPA encrypted network and VIOLA, the throughput reached speeds of
    > 346KB/sec.
    >
    > Jack was spot on with his assesment of WEP (and considering this heap is a
    > Celeron 2.8GHz maybe the WEP encryption is just too much for it to handle.
    >
    > My problem now is convincing the client to change their router to WPA.
    > I've
    > run into situations where just the opposite occurs, where some clients
    > cannot
    > connect to a WPA network.
    >
    > I'll work with the images and various installs I have to hopefully get a
    > more suitable answer for my client, but as of now I at least have been
    > rewarded with some progress on this issue.
    >
    > Thanks for the time, Jack, and I would encourage anyone with any ideas to
    > chime in.
    > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    >
    >> Hi
    >> At this point I would reinstall Windows, if it does not help (given that
    >> millions of Wireless Laptop work well with windows). I would assume that
    >> there is some thing inherent in the Laptop Hardware that creates this
    >> problem.
    >> There are options like sending back the Laptop to the manufacturer, or
    >> buying very expensive tools to do a real technical analysis of the
    >> situation
    >> (Fluke sells a lot of hardware that is related to Networking and wireless
    >> network's operation analysis).
    >> However I see situations like this as more as a Psychological issue, many
    >> people/clients that are used to "old days technology" have difficulties
    >> to
    >> adjust to 21st commodity technology.
    >> As you probably know there are many problems involving computers that at
    >> a
    >> certain point spending many hours to try to "fix" them is more expensive
    >> than buying another device. Since computers are Not People but mainly
    >> pieces
    >> of Plastic and Silicone, replacing or not is only an economical decision.
    >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >>
    >> "VReggie" wrote in message
    >> news:6C05736C-2856-40C3-B457-5F0DCCB3EF0A@microsoft.com...
    >> >I have two sources of wireless in my facility, one running WEP (for
    >> > compatibility with various clients) and one running WPA.
    >> >
    >> > One AP is a Verizon supplied ActionTec MI424WR running WEP, the other
    >> > is a
    >> > LinkSys WRT300N running WPA. I connect to these APs with literally
    >> > hundreds
    >> > of other client's machines, of varying setups, ages and OSes. I've
    >> > never
    >> > had
    >> > this particularly exaggerated problem with any machine until now.
    >> >
    >> > Connecting to either encrypted network results in throughput so slow
    >> > it's
    >> > un-usable. The speeds vary from 36kb\second down to 1 byte\second.
    >> >
    >> > If I setup an unsecured network and connect to that it works as I'd
    >> > expect
    >> > a
    >> > wireless network should; a tad slower, but very usable.
    >> >
    >> > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Hi
    >> >> Old WEP use to slow down Wireless.
    >> >> WPA/WPA2 affect is negligible.
    >> >> What is your Wireless source and its Speed?
    >> >> If it is really much slower than the "Speed" expected without
    >> >> encryption,
    >> >> then it indicates some general problem with the Wireless, and has to
    >> >> be
    >> >> dealt with first.
    >> >> As a frame of reference, http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
    >> >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >> >>
    >> >> "VReggie" wrote in message
    >> >> news:80865D9E-11DF-4838-A9A4-109A8FAC91C2@microsoft.com...
    >> >> >I have a strange and persistent problem that no-one (including
    >> >> >paid-for
    >> >> > Microsoft Technicians) seem to be able to solve.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > I have an HP Pavilion laptop running WIndows XP Home SP2 equipped
    >> >> > with
    >> >> > both
    >> >> > wired and wireless network adapters. The machine is fully updated
    >> >> > and
    >> >> > void
    >> >> > of any malware\spyware or viruses.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > When connected to the network via the wired connection the
    >> >> > through-put
    >> >> > is
    >> >> > fine.
    >> >> > When connected to an un-secured (no WEP, WPA, etc) the through-put
    >> >> > is
    >> >> > slower, but definitely usable.
    >> >> > When connected to a secured wireless network, throughput slows to an
    >> >> > absolute crawl (less than 1kb\second).
    >> >> >
    >> >> > I've tried replacing the internal wireless card with a similar
    >> >> > adapter
    >> >> > and
    >> >> > get the same results.
    >> >> > I've tried removing the internal adapter, installing a PCMCIA based
    >> >> > Wireless
    >> >> > adapter, and get the same exact results.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > The problem seems related to the encryped networks. My question is
    >> >> > what
    >> >> > software\component of Windows handles wireless encryption. Can this
    >> >> > be
    >> >> > corrupt? Can it be replaced, updated?
    >> >> >
    >> >> > I'm at a total loss at explaining this, and needless to say my
    >> >> > customer
    >> >> > is
    >> >> > a
    >> >> > bit miffed (as am I with the apparently clueless tech support I've
    >> >> > gotten
    >> >> > through paid Microsoft support).
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Anyone have any ideas? Suggestions?
    >> >>
    >> >>

    >>
    >>



  8. Re: Wireless networking slow when encrypted

    WEP might be a security risk, but it's better than no security. Being hacked
    would require a potential hacker to have the time and inclination to do so on
    an unkown network.

    I've also found that some older clients can't use WPA, although I am
    transitioning my clients slowly over to it.

    If Microsoft made data\profile\application transfer from PC to PC easier,
    90% of my clients would buy a new computer more often. Half the battle is
    transferring your data and applications to the new machine.

    Once again, licensing holds us back.

    Thanks for your time, Jack.

    "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:

    > Hi
    > May be explaining to the client that WEP can be broken in 5min. would
    > convince her.
    > In addition it is important to explain to the person that security Broken is
    > not just a matter of logging to the one system or stealing little Internet
    > Bandwidth. The Hacker can sniff info from the signal in the air and the
    > victim does not even know about it.
    > http://hardware.slashdot.org/article.../04/03/2116239
    > In addition a new Wireless Router that can do WPA can be found for $30 which
    > less then the value of one hour technical work.
    > Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >
    > "VReggie" wrote in message
    > news:B9BB74DA-A25A-4885-826B-405FC63E776E@microsoft.com...
    > > For anyone following this, here is what I've done and found;
    > >
    > > I tried a repair install of Windows XP (I've had luck with this before),
    > > but
    > > this didn't help a bit.
    > >
    > > I then reformatted and re-installed Windows (after imaging the client's
    > > drive)
    > > and reinstalled just the basic driver set (wireed and wireless NIC). I
    > > used an PCMCIA wireless adapter.
    > >
    > > Connecting to a WEP encrypted network was as slow as before. I connected
    > > to
    > > my WPA encrypted network and VIOLA, the throughput reached speeds of
    > > 346KB/sec.
    > >
    > > Jack was spot on with his assesment of WEP (and considering this heap is a
    > > Celeron 2.8GHz maybe the WEP encryption is just too much for it to handle.
    > >
    > > My problem now is convincing the client to change their router to WPA.
    > > I've
    > > run into situations where just the opposite occurs, where some clients
    > > cannot
    > > connect to a WPA network.
    > >
    > > I'll work with the images and various installs I have to hopefully get a
    > > more suitable answer for my client, but as of now I at least have been
    > > rewarded with some progress on this issue.
    > >
    > > Thanks for the time, Jack, and I would encourage anyone with any ideas to
    > > chime in.
    > > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    > >
    > >> Hi
    > >> At this point I would reinstall Windows, if it does not help (given that
    > >> millions of Wireless Laptop work well with windows). I would assume that
    > >> there is some thing inherent in the Laptop Hardware that creates this
    > >> problem.
    > >> There are options like sending back the Laptop to the manufacturer, or
    > >> buying very expensive tools to do a real technical analysis of the
    > >> situation
    > >> (Fluke sells a lot of hardware that is related to Networking and wireless
    > >> network's operation analysis).
    > >> However I see situations like this as more as a Psychological issue, many
    > >> people/clients that are used to "old days technology" have difficulties
    > >> to
    > >> adjust to 21st commodity technology.
    > >> As you probably know there are many problems involving computers that at
    > >> a
    > >> certain point spending many hours to try to "fix" them is more expensive
    > >> than buying another device. Since computers are Not People but mainly
    > >> pieces
    > >> of Plastic and Silicone, replacing or not is only an economical decision.
    > >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    > >>
    > >> "VReggie" wrote in message
    > >> news:6C05736C-2856-40C3-B457-5F0DCCB3EF0A@microsoft.com...
    > >> >I have two sources of wireless in my facility, one running WEP (for
    > >> > compatibility with various clients) and one running WPA.
    > >> >
    > >> > One AP is a Verizon supplied ActionTec MI424WR running WEP, the other
    > >> > is a
    > >> > LinkSys WRT300N running WPA. I connect to these APs with literally
    > >> > hundreds
    > >> > of other client's machines, of varying setups, ages and OSes. I've
    > >> > never
    > >> > had
    > >> > this particularly exaggerated problem with any machine until now.
    > >> >
    > >> > Connecting to either encrypted network results in throughput so slow
    > >> > it's
    > >> > un-usable. The speeds vary from 36kb\second down to 1 byte\second.
    > >> >
    > >> > If I setup an unsecured network and connect to that it works as I'd
    > >> > expect
    > >> > a
    > >> > wireless network should; a tad slower, but very usable.
    > >> >
    > >> > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >> Hi
    > >> >> Old WEP use to slow down Wireless.
    > >> >> WPA/WPA2 affect is negligible.
    > >> >> What is your Wireless source and its Speed?
    > >> >> If it is really much slower than the "Speed" expected without
    > >> >> encryption,
    > >> >> then it indicates some general problem with the Wireless, and has to
    > >> >> be
    > >> >> dealt with first.
    > >> >> As a frame of reference, http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
    > >> >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    > >> >>
    > >> >> "VReggie" wrote in message
    > >> >> news:80865D9E-11DF-4838-A9A4-109A8FAC91C2@microsoft.com...
    > >> >> >I have a strange and persistent problem that no-one (including
    > >> >> >paid-for
    > >> >> > Microsoft Technicians) seem to be able to solve.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > I have an HP Pavilion laptop running WIndows XP Home SP2 equipped
    > >> >> > with
    > >> >> > both
    > >> >> > wired and wireless network adapters. The machine is fully updated
    > >> >> > and
    > >> >> > void
    > >> >> > of any malware\spyware or viruses.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > When connected to the network via the wired connection the
    > >> >> > through-put
    > >> >> > is
    > >> >> > fine.
    > >> >> > When connected to an un-secured (no WEP, WPA, etc) the through-put
    > >> >> > is
    > >> >> > slower, but definitely usable.
    > >> >> > When connected to a secured wireless network, throughput slows to an
    > >> >> > absolute crawl (less than 1kb\second).
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > I've tried replacing the internal wireless card with a similar
    > >> >> > adapter
    > >> >> > and
    > >> >> > get the same results.
    > >> >> > I've tried removing the internal adapter, installing a PCMCIA based
    > >> >> > Wireless
    > >> >> > adapter, and get the same exact results.
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > The problem seems related to the encryped networks. My question is
    > >> >> > what
    > >> >> > software\component of Windows handles wireless encryption. Can this
    > >> >> > be
    > >> >> > corrupt? Can it be replaced, updated?
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > I'm at a total loss at explaining this, and needless to say my
    > >> >> > customer
    > >> >> > is
    > >> >> > a
    > >> >> > bit miffed (as am I with the apparently clueless tech support I've
    > >> >> > gotten
    > >> >> > through paid Microsoft support).
    > >> >> >
    > >> >> > Anyone have any ideas? Suggestions?
    > >> >>
    > >> >>
    > >>
    > >>

    >
    >


  9. Re: Wireless networking slow when encrypted

    Hi

    While I agree that Migration is a hard process and should be made easier.

    Securing information is beyond excuses and putting the blame on Microsoft
    does Not exonerate individuals that are Not willing to put up with a day
    work to secure their system.

    My experience shows that the majority of WEP only problems stem from using
    old Wireless Hardware (which has nothing to do with Microsoft).

    As far as "conservative style" computer's users goes.

    Windows XP was released in 2001, since then SP1/SP2, and WPA2 patch are
    available for free.

    WPA is an objective problem with Windows98/2000.

    If a person upgrade today to Vista it would hold for another 5 years.

    Thus taking into consideration that users of Win98/2000 are using it for at
    least 5 years it means One major upgrade that entails migration in 10 years.

    10 years, hardly an excuse to blame Microsoft and Not to take personal
    responsibility for secure computing.

    Jack (MVP-Networking).





    "VReggie" wrote in message
    news:E04E499F-2CC6-449E-9218-0AB6477E4E5D@microsoft.com...
    > WEP might be a security risk, but it's better than no security. Being
    > hacked
    > would require a potential hacker to have the time and inclination to do so
    > on
    > an unkown network.
    >
    > I've also found that some older clients can't use WPA, although I am
    > transitioning my clients slowly over to it.
    >
    > If Microsoft made data\profile\application transfer from PC to PC easier,
    > 90% of my clients would buy a new computer more often. Half the battle is
    > transferring your data and applications to the new machine.
    >
    > Once again, licensing holds us back.
    >
    > Thanks for your time, Jack.
    >
    > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    >
    >> Hi
    >> May be explaining to the client that WEP can be broken in 5min. would
    >> convince her.
    >> In addition it is important to explain to the person that security Broken
    >> is
    >> not just a matter of logging to the one system or stealing little
    >> Internet
    >> Bandwidth. The Hacker can sniff info from the signal in the air and the
    >> victim does not even know about it.
    >> http://hardware.slashdot.org/article.../04/03/2116239
    >> In addition a new Wireless Router that can do WPA can be found for $30
    >> which
    >> less then the value of one hour technical work.
    >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >>
    >> "VReggie" wrote in message
    >> news:B9BB74DA-A25A-4885-826B-405FC63E776E@microsoft.com...
    >> > For anyone following this, here is what I've done and found;
    >> >
    >> > I tried a repair install of Windows XP (I've had luck with this
    >> > before),
    >> > but
    >> > this didn't help a bit.
    >> >
    >> > I then reformatted and re-installed Windows (after imaging the client's
    >> > drive)
    >> > and reinstalled just the basic driver set (wireed and wireless NIC). I
    >> > used an PCMCIA wireless adapter.
    >> >
    >> > Connecting to a WEP encrypted network was as slow as before. I
    >> > connected
    >> > to
    >> > my WPA encrypted network and VIOLA, the throughput reached speeds of
    >> > 346KB/sec.
    >> >
    >> > Jack was spot on with his assesment of WEP (and considering this heap
    >> > is a
    >> > Celeron 2.8GHz maybe the WEP encryption is just too much for it to
    >> > handle.
    >> >
    >> > My problem now is convincing the client to change their router to WPA.
    >> > I've
    >> > run into situations where just the opposite occurs, where some clients
    >> > cannot
    >> > connect to a WPA network.
    >> >
    >> > I'll work with the images and various installs I have to hopefully get
    >> > a
    >> > more suitable answer for my client, but as of now I at least have been
    >> > rewarded with some progress on this issue.
    >> >
    >> > Thanks for the time, Jack, and I would encourage anyone with any ideas
    >> > to
    >> > chime in.
    >> > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Hi
    >> >> At this point I would reinstall Windows, if it does not help (given
    >> >> that
    >> >> millions of Wireless Laptop work well with windows). I would assume
    >> >> that
    >> >> there is some thing inherent in the Laptop Hardware that creates this
    >> >> problem.
    >> >> There are options like sending back the Laptop to the manufacturer, or
    >> >> buying very expensive tools to do a real technical analysis of the
    >> >> situation
    >> >> (Fluke sells a lot of hardware that is related to Networking and
    >> >> wireless
    >> >> network's operation analysis).
    >> >> However I see situations like this as more as a Psychological issue,
    >> >> many
    >> >> people/clients that are used to "old days technology" have
    >> >> difficulties
    >> >> to
    >> >> adjust to 21st commodity technology.
    >> >> As you probably know there are many problems involving computers that
    >> >> at
    >> >> a
    >> >> certain point spending many hours to try to "fix" them is more
    >> >> expensive
    >> >> than buying another device. Since computers are Not People but mainly
    >> >> pieces
    >> >> of Plastic and Silicone, replacing or not is only an economical
    >> >> decision.
    >> >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >> >>
    >> >> "VReggie" wrote in message
    >> >> news:6C05736C-2856-40C3-B457-5F0DCCB3EF0A@microsoft.com...
    >> >> >I have two sources of wireless in my facility, one running WEP (for
    >> >> > compatibility with various clients) and one running WPA.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > One AP is a Verizon supplied ActionTec MI424WR running WEP, the
    >> >> > other
    >> >> > is a
    >> >> > LinkSys WRT300N running WPA. I connect to these APs with literally
    >> >> > hundreds
    >> >> > of other client's machines, of varying setups, ages and OSes. I've
    >> >> > never
    >> >> > had
    >> >> > this particularly exaggerated problem with any machine until now.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Connecting to either encrypted network results in throughput so slow
    >> >> > it's
    >> >> > un-usable. The speeds vary from 36kb\second down to 1 byte\second.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > If I setup an unsecured network and connect to that it works as I'd
    >> >> > expect
    >> >> > a
    >> >> > wireless network should; a tad slower, but very usable.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > "Jack (MVP-Networking)." wrote:
    >> >> >
    >> >> >> Hi
    >> >> >> Old WEP use to slow down Wireless.
    >> >> >> WPA/WPA2 affect is negligible.
    >> >> >> What is your Wireless source and its Speed?
    >> >> >> If it is really much slower than the "Speed" expected without
    >> >> >> encryption,
    >> >> >> then it indicates some general problem with the Wireless, and has
    >> >> >> to
    >> >> >> be
    >> >> >> dealt with first.
    >> >> >> As a frame of reference, http://www.ezlan.net/net_speed.html
    >> >> >> Jack (MVP-Networking).
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >> "VReggie" wrote in message
    >> >> >> news:80865D9E-11DF-4838-A9A4-109A8FAC91C2@microsoft.com...
    >> >> >> >I have a strange and persistent problem that no-one (including
    >> >> >> >paid-for
    >> >> >> > Microsoft Technicians) seem to be able to solve.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > I have an HP Pavilion laptop running WIndows XP Home SP2 equipped
    >> >> >> > with
    >> >> >> > both
    >> >> >> > wired and wireless network adapters. The machine is fully
    >> >> >> > updated
    >> >> >> > and
    >> >> >> > void
    >> >> >> > of any malware\spyware or viruses.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > When connected to the network via the wired connection the
    >> >> >> > through-put
    >> >> >> > is
    >> >> >> > fine.
    >> >> >> > When connected to an un-secured (no WEP, WPA, etc) the
    >> >> >> > through-put
    >> >> >> > is
    >> >> >> > slower, but definitely usable.
    >> >> >> > When connected to a secured wireless network, throughput slows to
    >> >> >> > an
    >> >> >> > absolute crawl (less than 1kb\second).
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > I've tried replacing the internal wireless card with a similar
    >> >> >> > adapter
    >> >> >> > and
    >> >> >> > get the same results.
    >> >> >> > I've tried removing the internal adapter, installing a PCMCIA
    >> >> >> > based
    >> >> >> > Wireless
    >> >> >> > adapter, and get the same exact results.
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > The problem seems related to the encryped networks. My question
    >> >> >> > is
    >> >> >> > what
    >> >> >> > software\component of Windows handles wireless encryption. Can
    >> >> >> > this
    >> >> >> > be
    >> >> >> > corrupt? Can it be replaced, updated?
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > I'm at a total loss at explaining this, and needless to say my
    >> >> >> > customer
    >> >> >> > is
    >> >> >> > a
    >> >> >> > bit miffed (as am I with the apparently clueless tech support
    >> >> >> > I've
    >> >> >> > gotten
    >> >> >> > through paid Microsoft support).
    >> >> >> >
    >> >> >> > Anyone have any ideas? Suggestions?
    >> >> >>
    >> >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >>

    >>
    >>




  10. Re: Wireless networking slow when encrypted



    "VReggie" wrote:

    > WEP might be a security risk, but it's better than no security. Being hacked
    > would require a potential hacker to have the time and inclination to do so on
    > an unkown network.
    >


    Ask the people at TJX corp how secure WEP is, it has cost them millions when
    their data was stolen via their WEP wireless signal. If you are working for
    a client and their data is breeched you can be sure they will most likely
    point a finger at you for not properly securing their network, especially if
    this is a business network(not sure if it is). I know I would not allow a
    client to run a WEP network.

    Your statement that a hacker would need the time and inclination to hack the
    network....is 5 minutes a lot of time to dedicate? I always say better safe
    than sorry.




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