wireless connection - Wireless

This is a discussion on wireless connection - Wireless ; We have two computers on a wireless connection. Someone in our area has a wireless connection also. Every time we boot up the second computer, it shows the other person's wireless on our toobar with a secured connection. Each time ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: wireless connection

  1. wireless connection

    We have two computers on a wireless connection. Someone in our area has a
    wireless connection also. Every time we boot up the second computer, it
    shows the other person's wireless on our toobar with a secured connection.
    Each time we have to open up our wireless connection and re-connect. What is
    a secured connection, how does it work and how can we prevent this from over
    riding our wireless? Any information would be helpful on this matter.
    --
    Barbara

  2. Re: wireless connection

    Barbara wrote:
    > We have two computers on a wireless connection. Someone in our area has a
    > wireless connection also. Every time we boot up the second computer, it
    > shows the other person's wireless on our toobar with a secured connection.
    > Each time we have to open up our wireless connection and re-connect. What is
    > a secured connection, how does it work and how can we prevent this from over
    > riding our wireless? Any information would be helpful on this matter.


    The hardware used for wireless networking is just a radio. Just as you
    can pick up the same commercial radio station as your neighbor can,
    anyone with a wireless network adapter in their computer can pick up all
    of the wireless networks within range (the range for wireless networks
    is much less than commercial AM/FM radio stations, but as you've
    discovered, it extends for at least a couple of houses).

    All of the following changes are made by connecting to your router with
    one of your computers -- connected, at least temporarily, with an
    Ethernet cable -- and accessing the router's configuration utility.
    Read your router's User Guide for directions, or give the make/model of
    your router in your next post.

    Because it is undesirable to let strangers have access to your wireless
    network (in addition to using your Internet connection, they may be able
    to access/change the files on your computer), you should "secure" your
    wireless network by enabling the encryption capability built in to your
    wireless router and wireless access points. There are 3 "flavors" of
    encryption commonly available on home routers/home computers: WEP, WPA,
    and WPA2. WEP is now easily crackable, so you shouldn't use it. If all
    of your equipment is capable of WPA2, use that; otherwise, use WPA. You
    will want to use WPA/WPA2 - PSK or WPA/WPA2 - Personal. If given the
    choice, use AES.

    After you add encryption to the router, you will also have make
    corresponding changes in each of your computers.

    Just like commercial radio stations, wireless networking equipment uses
    different channels, except there aren't very many. In the US, there are
    11, but for practical purposes, only channels 1, 6, and 11 are far
    enough apart to make a difference. Most home routers default to channel
    6. If you are experiencing interference from a nearby wireless network,
    change your router to use

    channel 1 or 11. Your computers will detect the change automatically.

    Also like commercial radio stations, each wireless router has its own
    "name" or "call sign." In the context of wireless networking, this is
    called the SSID. You should set the SSID in your router to something
    unique that is not your name or address.

    Here's some reading:
    Wireless - Basic Configuration -
    http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Config.html

    Wireless - Basic Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html

    MVP Barb Bowman on wireless security - http://tinyurl.com/56fc5

    Tom's Hardware Wireless Security FAQs
    http://www.tomsnetworking.com/2006/0...ity/index.html



    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 4KB of RAM and 72KB of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm

  3. Re: wireless connection

    On Thu, 1 Nov 2007 05:45:01 -0700, Barbara
    wrote:

    >We have two computers on a wireless connection. Someone in our area has a
    >wireless connection also. Every time we boot up the second computer, it
    >shows the other person's wireless on our toobar with a secured connection.
    >Each time we have to open up our wireless connection and re-connect. What is
    >a secured connection, how does it work and how can we prevent this from over
    >riding our wireless? Any information would be helpful on this matter.


    Barbara,

    Depending upon the WiFi client that you're using, you should have a selection
    for "Preferred Connections". Make sure that you select Preferred Connections,
    and that the other connection is NOT in the list. And make sure that you have a
    unique SSID, and that you are broadcasting the SSID.

    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/2005/1...r-connect.html

    --
    Cheers,
    Chuck, MS-MVP 2005-2007 [Windows - Networking]
    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/
    Paranoia is not a problem, when it's a normal response from experience.
    My email is AT DOT
    actual address pchuck mvps org.

  4. RE: wireless connection

    Chuck and Lem,

    Thank you both for responding so fast to my inquiry. I am not sure about
    doing what you all suggested but I will contact a neighbor who set up our
    wireless connection and see if he can secure our computers. I am new to
    wireless so feel inadequate on attempting to solve the problem. Again thank
    you!
    --
    Barbara


    "Barbara" wrote:

    > We have two computers on a wireless connection. Someone in our area has a
    > wireless connection also. Every time we boot up the second computer, it
    > shows the other person's wireless on our toobar with a secured connection.
    > Each time we have to open up our wireless connection and re-connect. What is
    > a secured connection, how does it work and how can we prevent this from over
    > riding our wireless? Any information would be helpful on this matter.
    > --
    > Barbara


  5. Re: wireless connection

    On Thu, 1 Nov 2007 18:46:01 -0700, Barbara
    wrote:

    >Chuck and Lem,
    >
    >Thank you both for responding so fast to my inquiry. I am not sure about
    >doing what you all suggested but I will contact a neighbor who set up our
    >wireless connection and see if he can secure our computers. I am new to
    >wireless so feel inadequate on attempting to solve the problem. Again thank
    >you!



    Barbara,

    Computers will do that to everybody. I say that if you don't feel inadequate,
    you're not doing all that you can. I am highly inadequate, frequently, and I'll
    bet that a few others here would say the same.

    Come back here anytime, and ask more questions. We'll be here.

    --
    Cheers,
    Chuck, MS-MVP 2005-2007 [Windows - Networking]
    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/
    Paranoia is not a problem, when it's a normal response from experience.
    My email is AT DOT
    actual address pchuck mvps org.

  6. Re: wireless connection

    I just don't want to mess up the computers. The brand of the wireless is:
    Linksys-Compact B WRT54GC. Is there a simple and easy way that I can make
    our wireless connection secured?
    --
    Barbara


    "Chuck [MVP]" wrote:

    > On Thu, 1 Nov 2007 18:46:01 -0700, Barbara
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Chuck and Lem,
    > >
    > >Thank you both for responding so fast to my inquiry. I am not sure about
    > >doing what you all suggested but I will contact a neighbor who set up our
    > >wireless connection and see if he can secure our computers. I am new to
    > >wireless so feel inadequate on attempting to solve the problem. Again thank
    > >you!

    >
    >
    > Barbara,
    >
    > Computers will do that to everybody. I say that if you don't feel inadequate,
    > you're not doing all that you can. I am highly inadequate, frequently, and I'll
    > bet that a few others here would say the same.
    >
    > Come back here anytime, and ask more questions. We'll be here.
    >
    > --
    > Cheers,
    > Chuck, MS-MVP 2005-2007 [Windows - Networking]
    > http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/
    > Paranoia is not a problem, when it's a normal response from experience.
    > My email is AT DOT
    > actual address pchuck mvps org.
    >


  7. Re: wireless connection

    "Barbara" wrote in message news:4B2685F5-FE3E-4899-BEA8-C2916C2FDC12@microsoft.com...
    > We have two computers on a wireless connection. Someone in our area has a
    > wireless connection also. Every time we boot up the second computer, it
    > shows the other person's wireless on our toobar with a secured connection.
    > Each time we have to open up our wireless connection and re-connect. What is
    > a secured connection, how does it work and how can we prevent this from over
    > riding our wireless? Any information would be helpful on this matter.
    > --
    > Barbara


    Barbara,

    It is normal and expected that your neigbor's network is visible in the scan list -
    that you call "toolbar".
    Wi-fi is just a radio - as Lem wrote - so it can pick everything that floats in the ether.
    Some people, however, are amazingly creative in choosing names for their
    wireless networks... Hope it is not your case )

    Your neigbor has a secured connection - this also is normal and expected.
    This means that connection to their network is possible only to those who
    has some kind of password. This is like everybody can see
    your house, but need a key to enter. In fact, every owner of a wi-fi network
    should lock it *well*, to avoid a lot of mutual issues between themselves
    and the neigbors.

    So now you can just proceed to securing your own wi-fi network and set
    your computers to work in it...

    Again, as others wrote, this may be pretty complex even for a pro.
    You are welcome to read the directions that come with your wi-fi router
    and adapters; tutorials kindly provided by members of this community.
    Or maybe your neigbor can just come over to help

    Regards,
    --PA




  8. Re: wireless connection

    Hi
    From the weakest to the strongest, Wireless security capacity is.

    No Security
    MAC______(Band Aid if nothing else is available).
    WEP64____(Easy, to "Brake" by knowledgeable people).
    WEP128___(A little Harder, but "Hackable" too).
    WPA-PSK__(Very Hard to Brake ).
    WPA-AES__(Not functionally Breakable)
    WPA2____ (Not functionally Breakable).

    Note 1: WPA-AES the the current entry level rendition of WPA2.

    Note 2: If you use WinXP and did not updated it you would have to download
    the WPA2 patch from Microsoft. http://support.microsoft.com/kb/893357

    The documentation of your Wireless devices (Wireless Router, and Wireless
    Computer's Card) should state the type of security that is available with
    your Wireless hardware.

    All devices MUST be set to the same security level using the same pass
    phrase.

    Therefore the security must be set according what ever is the best possible
    of one of the Wireless devices.

    I.e. even if most of your system might be capable to be configured to the
    max. with WPA2, but one device is only capable to be configured to max . of
    WEP, to whole system must be configured to WEP.

    If you need more good security and one device (like a Wireless card that can
    do WEP only) is holding better security for the whole Network, replace the
    device with a better one.

    Setting Wireless Security - http://www.ezlan.net/Wireless_Security.html

    Jack (MVP-Networking).

    "Barbara" wrote in message
    news:4B2685F5-FE3E-4899-BEA8-C2916C2FDC12@microsoft.com...
    > We have two computers on a wireless connection. Someone in our area has a
    > wireless connection also. Every time we boot up the second computer, it
    > shows the other person's wireless on our toobar with a secured connection.
    > Each time we have to open up our wireless connection and re-connect. What
    > is
    > a secured connection, how does it work and how can we prevent this from
    > over
    > riding our wireless? Any information would be helpful on this matter.
    > --
    > Barbara



  9. Re: wireless connection

    Barbara wrote:
    > I just don't want to mess up the computers. The brand of the wireless is:
    > Linksys-Compact B WRT54GC. Is there a simple and easy way that I can make
    > our wireless connection secured?


    It's not too hard, but you would do well to read the User Guide. It
    should be on the CD that came with your router (in pdf form) or download
    it from this page: http://tinyurl.com/36956c Read Chapter 5.

    Basically, what you do is to connect a computer to the router using an
    Ethernet cable (this is temporary; you can go back to your wireless
    connection when you're done). Then, open a browser (IE or FireFox) and
    enter the router's address (192.168.1.1). This will take you to the
    router's log-in screen, and assuming that your neighbor didn't change
    the username/password, leave the User Name field blank and enter "admin"
    (without quotes) as the password.

    Click the "wireless" tab. On this page, you can set the SSID or the
    name for your wireless netowrk (see post from Pavel A.). Then click
    "wireless security." This is where you set the kind of encryption you
    will use (WEP/WPA/WPA2; see post from Jack) and the passphrase. Use
    WPA2-Personal (with AES) if the wifi adapter on both of your computers
    will support that or WPA-Personal (with AES).

    Or, as Pavel suggested, ask your neighbor to come back and set up
    encryption for you.

    --
    Lem -- MS-MVP - Networking

    To the moon and back with 4KB of RAM and 72KB of ROM.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Guidance_Computer
    http://history.nasa.gov/afj/compessay.htm

+ Reply to Thread