How to change hard disk - Windows NT

This is a discussion on How to change hard disk - Windows NT ; Hi, I am using a hard disk in my comp. It seems to me that the hard disk is no longer working properly though not crashed yet. It's an old hard disk. I want to change the hard disk. How ...

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Thread: How to change hard disk

  1. How to change hard disk

    Hi,

    I am using a hard disk in my comp. It seems to me that the hard disk
    is no longer working properly though not crashed yet. It's an old hard
    disk.

    I want to change the hard disk. How can I do that smoothly?

    I mean if I just copy all the file to another hard disk and then
    replace the hard disk and copy again, there will be an issue that the
    hard disk is a system hard disk. How do I reboot? Also many programs
    have registry information connecting them. How are they preserved?

  2. Re: How to change hard disk


    "jonathan" wrote in message
    news:797a9cfc.0405071836.66050f47@posting.google.c om...
    > Hi,
    >
    > I am using a hard disk in my comp. It seems to me that the hard disk
    > is no longer working properly though not crashed yet. It's an old hard
    > disk.
    >
    > I want to change the hard disk. How can I do that smoothly?
    >
    > I mean if I just copy all the file to another hard disk and then
    > replace the hard disk and copy again, there will be an issue that the
    > hard disk is a system hard disk. How do I reboot? Also many programs
    > have registry information connecting them. How are they preserved?


    You need a disk imaging program such as Acronis TrueImage or Norton
    Ghost. Alternatively, you can download such a program from some
    freeware site, if you are prepared to trust it.



  3. Re: How to change hard disk

    jonathan wrote:
    >
    >
    > I want to change the hard disk. How can I do that smoothly?
    >
    > I mean if I just copy all the file to another hard disk and then
    > replace the hard disk and copy again, there will be an issue that the
    > hard disk is a system hard disk. How do I reboot? Also many programs
    > have registry information connecting them. How are they preserved?



    There is way you could manage this (assuming we are speaking about NT4)
    without any 3rd party software:


    1. get *2* empty disks (HDD Temp, HDD Target)
    2. temporarily install NT4 on the HDD Temp (don't forget service packs)
    connect HDD current and HDD target to this Temp system if you haven't
    done this already
    3. repartition and foramt HDD target according to your current HDD (HDD
    current)
    you may make the partitions bigger but leave the partion scheme
    don't forget: boot partion < 8Gb and within the first 8 GByte of the
    HDD
    don't forget: you might get troubles if you create FAT16 partions > 2Gb
    4. copy the content of every partion from HDD current to HDD target
    using the NT4 of HDD Temp.
    you may use the explorer for this but you have to take care that you
    are getting *all* files
    (show hidden and system files, show extensions)
    5. mark the coorect partion on HDD target as start partition (same as on
    HDD current)
    6. remove HDD temp and HDD current; connect HDD target like HDD current
    is connected *now*.


    You have to change your HDD configuration a couples of times if you do
    it this way. Don't forget to jumper the disks correctly after each move.

    You may loose some meta data of the files (eg user rights) but you'll
    get a troubleless running system (as far as your current is).

    Stephan

  4. Re: How to change hard disk


    "Karl-Stephan Werkmeister" wrote in message
    news:40ADBE1B.1994C6D8@web.de...
    > jonathan wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > I want to change the hard disk. How can I do that smoothly?
    > >
    > > I mean if I just copy all the file to another hard disk and then
    > > replace the hard disk and copy again, there will be an issue that the
    > > hard disk is a system hard disk. How do I reboot? Also many programs
    > > have registry information connecting them. How are they preserved?

    >
    >
    > There is way you could manage this (assuming we are speaking about NT4)
    > without any 3rd party software:
    >
    >
    > 1. get *2* empty disks (HDD Temp, HDD Target)
    > 2. temporarily install NT4 on the HDD Temp (don't forget service packs)
    > connect HDD current and HDD target to this Temp system if you haven't
    > done this already
    > 3. repartition and foramt HDD target according to your current HDD (HDD
    > current)
    > you may make the partitions bigger but leave the partion scheme
    > don't forget: boot partion < 8Gb and within the first 8 GByte of the
    > HDD
    > don't forget: you might get troubles if you create FAT16 partions > 2Gb
    > 4. copy the content of every partion from HDD current to HDD target
    > using the NT4 of HDD Temp.
    > you may use the explorer for this but you have to take care that you
    > are getting *all* files
    > (show hidden and system files, show extensions)
    > 5. mark the coorect partion on HDD target as start partition (same as on
    > HDD current)
    > 6. remove HDD temp and HDD current; connect HDD target like HDD current
    > is connected *now*.
    >
    >
    > You have to change your HDD configuration a couples of times if you do
    > it this way. Don't forget to jumper the disks correctly after each move.
    >
    > You may loose some meta data of the files (eg user rights) but you'll
    > get a troubleless running system (as far as your current is).
    >
    > Stephan


    A few comments:
    - I assume that you actually mean "Active partition" when you write
    "Start partition".
    - Can the OP find out from your post ***how*** to mark a partition "active"?
    - You said nothing about the WinNT boot sector. Without a correct
    boot sector, WinNT will never boot.
    - While your scheme will work, the following derivative requires no
    spare hard disk, needs no temporary installation of WinNT and
    will therefore be much faster: Connect both the old and the new disk
    to the secondary IDE controller in some other WinNT PC, then
    perform the copy process.
    - While your effort of writing such a detailed reply is laudable, it is
    probably wasted on the OP, because you waited almost two weeks
    before writing it.



  5. Re: How to change hard disk

    "Pegasus (MVP)" wrote:
    >
    > "Karl-Stephan Werkmeister" wrote in message
    > news:40ADBE1B.1994C6D8@web.de...
    > > jonathan wrote:
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > I want to change the hard disk. How can I do that smoothly?
    > > >
    > > >[...]

    > >
    > > There is way you could manage this (assuming we are speaking about NT4)
    > > without any 3rd party software:
    > >
    > >[...]
    > > Stephan

    >
    > A few comments:
    > - I assume that you actually mean "Active partition" when you write
    > "Start partition".


    OK, I haven't made this clear enough - the answer is yes and no:

    First, you have to take care of what I called start partition:
    the partition where the NT kernel is located (corresponding to the entry
    in the boot.ini like "multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINNT="Windows
    NT Workstation, Version 4.0" ). This is the partition where the
    system32 folder is located. If the new HDD layout is the same like the
    old one you won't get any troubles with "inaccesible boot device BSODs".
    Of course, this won't work if you eg copy an IDE-HDD to a SCSI-HDD. Then
    you have to correct the boot.ini manually (and therefore you are likely
    to need again the second (temporarily) active WinNT.
    Second, if you copied the HDD with an active partition (likely but not
    necessarily) you will probably want to mark the corresponding target
    partition also as active (and bootable) again (see below).

    > - Can the OP find out from your post ***how*** to mark a partition "active"?


    If I take the absence of any 3rd party software as my starting-point I
    know only one way to mark a partition as active: the NT disk manager -
    this is what I meant to use.

    > - You said nothing about the WinNT boot sector. Without a correct
    > boot sector, WinNT will never boot.


    Formating a (HDD) partition and marking it as active will make it
    bootable without any other further action, at least in NT (4.0). This
    will even work with a floppy disk (see below).

    > - While your scheme will work, the following derivative requires no
    > spare hard disk, needs no temporary installation of WinNT and
    > will therefore be much faster: Connect both the old and the new disk
    > to the secondary IDE controller in some other WinNT PC, then
    > perform the copy process.


    Yes, you are right. But you might harm the 2nd NT installation; and you
    obviously will do so if you mark a partion of your target HDD as active
    (see above) using *this* NT installation. But there is a workaround.
    Format a floppy disk using your current system. Proceed like described
    but do *not* change the active partition. Your target will of course not
    be able to boot from HDD but from FDD if you add the boot.ini and the
    files ntldr and ntdetect.com (and maybe the the NTBOOTDD.SYS for some
    SCSI systems) to the floppy. After you have booted successfully you are
    able to mark the active partition using your already running target
    system.

    > - While your effort of writing such a detailed reply is laudable, it is
    > probably wasted on the OP, because you waited almost two weeks
    > before writing it.


    Sorry for this, you are right again. My excuse is that I didn't wait but
    hadn't read this unanswered question before. I didn't even watch this
    group for a long time until I had got a question myself. On the other
    hand I foud this question worth to be answered anyway. I have been
    confronted with this problem (and question) many times.

    Finally, there is one more point that might cause troubles if you copy a
    system this way: The short file and folder names. If you simply copy
    files and folders using the explorer two folders (eg c:\long foldername1
    (short: c:\longfo~2) and c:\long foldername2 (short: c:\lonfo~1) may
    result in c:\long foldername1 (short: c:\longfo~1) and c:\long
    foldername2 (short: c:\lonfo~2) on the target system. Unfortunately,
    some registry entries rely on these short names. I think there are
    utilities out to copy files and folders preserving the short names. But
    you can avoid this yourself if you copy the folders in the order of
    their short names. I miss this myself again and again but this did never
    end up in seriously demaged copies. I just had to scan for and adjust
    these registy entries afterwards (otherwise eg the media player or the
    virus scanner might refuse to work properly).

    Stephan

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