School Network - Windows NT

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  1. School Network

    Hi our art dept has 6 machines, these at present are not networked, we would
    like to network them, only 1 machine at present has internet access via the
    schools main network, using the proxy server.

    We would like to each class could logon e.g. username: yr11 and access all
    the work they have done on any machine, does this require a server, if so
    what is the best OS?

    Also network infrastructure - cables, etc, how easy is it to setup, what is
    needed, cheapest place to buy.

    The machines OS are a mixture of windows ME, 98se, 95.We have scanner and
    two printers.

    Our current budget is 0, we as a dept would be paying out of our own pocket.

    Also i have never used linux, but have heard that this is good.

    Thanks In Advance

    Sam





  2. Re: School Network

    GarvieS wrote:
    > Hi our art dept has 6 machines, these at present are not networked, we
    > would like to network them, only 1 machine at present has internet access
    > via the schools main network, using the proxy server.
    >
    > We would like to each class could logon e.g. username: yr11 and access all
    > the work they have done on any machine, does this require a server, if so
    > what is the best OS?


    If you want roaming profiles, so that you log into any machine and get your
    own desktop... you'll likely need a Windows Server OS. If you just want to
    be able to access, say, a drive, with your logon details giving access to a
    directory, this is much easier.

    > Also network infrastructure - cables, etc, how easy is it to setup, what
    > is needed, cheapest place to buy.


    A hub and cables long enough to reach each machine. Plug them all together.

    > The machines OS are a mixture of windows ME, 98se, 95.We have scanner and
    > two printers.
    >
    > Our current budget is 0, we as a dept would be paying out of our own
    > pocket.
    >
    > Also i have never used linux, but have heard that this is good.


    Linux is excellent, but not easy to set up properly. It's also free. It
    will allow you to set up samba, which is exactly what you need to allow
    windows to access drive space on the Linux box. With it set up correctly,
    you can map each user to their own space.

    You can also set up either Windows or Linux to allow the other machines
    access to the internet. Alternatively, you could plug the cable to the rest
    of the school network into the hub, along with the 6 machines and allow the
    existing network take care of connecting them (this may require the sysadmin
    to push some buttons, or may not). Do you not have a Network Administrator
    on site that could set this up for you? Who administrates the network?

    Ben
    --
    A7N8X FAQ: www.ben.pope.name/a7n8x_faq.html
    Questions by email will likely be ignored, please use the newsgroups.
    I'm not just a number. To many, I'm known as a String...



  3. Re: School Network

    In a word: SME Linux. - designed as a server Linux. Can be run on a P90 with
    10 users

    --
    Yours

    Zebedee

    (Claiming asylum in an attempt
    to escape paying his debts to
    Dougal and Florence)


    "GarvieS" wrote in message
    news:AN3yc.2$_e1.0@newsfe1-win...
    > Hi our art dept has 6 machines, these at present are not networked, we

    would
    > like to network them, only 1 machine at present has internet access via

    the
    > schools main network, using the proxy server.
    >
    > We would like to each class could logon e.g. username: yr11 and access all
    > the work they have done on any machine, does this require a server, if so
    > what is the best OS?
    >
    > Also network infrastructure - cables, etc, how easy is it to setup, what

    is
    > needed, cheapest place to buy.
    >
    > The machines OS are a mixture of windows ME, 98se, 95.We have scanner and
    > two printers.
    >
    > Our current budget is 0, we as a dept would be paying out of our own

    pocket.
    >
    > Also i have never used linux, but have heard that this is good.
    >
    > Thanks In Advance
    >
    > Sam
    >
    >
    >
    >




  4. Re: School Network

    GarvieS wrote:
    > Hi our art dept has 6 machines, these at present are not networked, we would
    > like to network them, only 1 machine at present has internet access via the
    > schools main network, using the proxy server.
    >
    > We would like to each class could logon e.g. username: yr11 and access all
    > the work they have done on any machine, does this require a server, if so
    > what is the best OS?
    >
    > Also network infrastructure - cables, etc, how easy is it to setup, what is
    > needed, cheapest place to buy.
    >
    > The machines OS are a mixture of windows ME, 98se, 95.We have scanner and
    > two printers.
    >
    > Our current budget is 0, we as a dept would be paying out of our own pocket.
    >
    > Also i have never used linux, but have heard that this is good.
    >
    > Thanks In Advance
    >
    > Sam
    >
    >
    >
    >


    For a server you should go for Linux just about any distro would do,
    Zebedee mentioned SME I have no experience of it but looking at the
    Linux emporium web site
    http://www.linuxemporium.co.uk/products/specialist/ it fits the bill
    very nicely. Another good source of Linux info is
    http://www.distrowatch.com/.


    As for hardware you will need a hub either 10baseT or 100baseT
    these are very cheap but I am sure some parent will have an old 8 port
    10baseT hub sitting doing nothing.
    For network cards (nics) Realtek RL8139 can be found for under 5
    pounds (if stuck look on ebay), I always advise anyone setting up a
    network to have a couple of spares in stock so for 6 computers get 8 cards.

    Patch Cables and Cabling kits with instructions can be bought from the
    larger B&Q superstores at a very reasonable price.

    Also it is adviseable to get as much memory in each PC as you can - an
    appeal to parents might get memory that has been displaced by bigger
    chips durring an upgrade.

  5. Re: School Network


    GarvieS wrote:
    > Hi our art dept has 6 machines, these at present are not networked, we would
    > like to network them, only 1 machine at present has internet access via the
    > schools main network, using the proxy server.
    >
    > We would like to each class could logon e.g. username: yr11 and access all
    > the work they have done on any machine, does this require a server, if so
    > what is the best OS?
    >
    > Also network infrastructure - cables, etc, how easy is it to setup, what is
    > needed, cheapest place to buy.
    >
    > The machines OS are a mixture of windows ME, 98se, 95.We have scanner and
    > two printers.
    >
    > Our current budget is 0, we as a dept would be paying out of our own pocket.
    >
    > Also i have never used linux, but have heard that this is good.
    >
    > Thanks In Advance
    >
    > Sam
    >
    >
    >
    >



    I keep seeing people recommend Linux to some one who openly admits they
    know nothing about the OS. Linux is a form of Unix and as anyone who
    knows about Unix will say is not that easy to learn.

    Linux is great but is not as easy as MS.

    Andrew

    --
    To reply via email, first reverse the address below then replace the
    (at) with @ and the (dot) with .
    moc(tod)xepip(tod)lsd(ta)spuorgswen_werdna

  6. Re: School Network

    Andrew Welham wrote:

    >
    > GarvieS wrote:
    >
    >> Hi our art dept has 6 machines, these at present are not networked, we
    >> would
    >> like to network them, only 1 machine at present has internet access
    >> via the
    >> schools main network, using the proxy server.
    >>
    >> We would like to each class could logon e.g. username: yr11 and access
    >> all
    >> the work they have done on any machine, does this require a server, if so
    >> what is the best OS?
    >>
    >> Also network infrastructure - cables, etc, how easy is it to setup,
    >> what is
    >> needed, cheapest place to buy.
    >>
    >> The machines OS are a mixture of windows ME, 98se, 95.We have scanner and
    >> two printers.
    >>
    >> Our current budget is 0, we as a dept would be paying out of our own
    >> pocket.
    >>
    >> Also i have never used linux, but have heard that this is good.
    >>
    >> Thanks In Advance
    >>
    >> Sam
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > I keep seeing people recommend Linux to some one who openly admits they
    > know nothing about the OS. Linux is a form of Unix and as anyone who
    > knows about Unix will say is not that easy to learn.
    >
    > Linux is great but is not as easy as MS.
    >
    > Andrew
    >

    Personally, I think they're similar in difficulty. They both require a
    base of knowledge. If you already know one or the other, then you have
    that base and that one will seem easier. If you start fresh, though,
    either will seem hard.

    Both have quirks. Neither is trivial. The newsgroups are littered with
    posts from people having problems trying to do allegedly simple things.

    --
    The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
    minimize spam. Our true address is of the form che...@prodigy.net.

  7. Re: School Network

    Andrew Welham wrote:
    >
    > GarvieS wrote:
    >
    >> Hi our art dept has 6 machines, these at present are not networked, we
    >> would
    >> like to network them, only 1 machine at present has internet access
    >> via the
    >> schools main network, using the proxy server.
    >>
    >> We would like to each class could logon e.g. username: yr11 and access
    >> all
    >> the work they have done on any machine, does this require a server, if so
    >> what is the best OS?
    >>
    >> Also network infrastructure - cables, etc, how easy is it to setup,
    >> what is
    >> needed, cheapest place to buy.
    >>
    >> The machines OS are a mixture of windows ME, 98se, 95.We have scanner and
    >> two printers.
    >>
    >> Our current budget is 0, we as a dept would be paying out of our own
    >> pocket.
    >>
    >> Also i have never used linux, but have heard that this is good.
    >>
    >> Thanks In Advance
    >>
    >> Sam
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > I keep seeing people recommend Linux to some one who openly admits they
    > know nothing about the OS. Linux is a form of Unix and as anyone who
    > knows about Unix will say is not that easy to learn.
    >
    > Linux is great but is not as easy as MS.
    >
    > Andrew
    >


    It took most computer techs 4 years to learn the tricks involved in
    keeping windows 95/98 stable when it replaced Windows 3.x lots of
    really obscure undocumented tricks hat weren't in the Windows
    certification course, some were simple things like copying the cab files
    to a directory on the HD and installing from there. Since then MS have
    unleashed major changes with each version and sub version of Windows,
    setting up a Windows server secure enough for a school environment is
    neither easy or cheap and demands a decently powerful PC, and thats
    before we tackle the problem of Windows viruess and other malware.

    In contrast most modern Linux distros will install from CD with a ready
    made SAMBA server for a network of Windows clients, all that is
    required to to set up directory, users and groups structures all of
    which can be done without going near the command line. The fact the
    Linux isn't Windows is actually an advantage in such a situation it is
    an added protection from viruses and simple curiosity hacking neither
    of which are exactly unknown in a school environment.
    We are not talking of setting up a server secure enough for GCHQ but one
    that will function well enough within the context to deliver the goods
    with a lot less hassle and/or cost than trying to get a Windows non
    server version to work and most importantly without needing the OS
    reinsinstalled every fornight because some young lad has stuck a virus
    infected floppy in a clients A drive.


    I am not a Linux extremist that is trying to push Linux on to every home
    users Windows PC, for a lot of reasons I think the time for that has
    not yet come I actually think Windows 98se/Me/NT4/2000 were pretty good
    for home use IF protected against viruses and hacking (note that having
    praised these earlier versions of Windows my views on Xp Home are
    unprintable) but where a simple locost server is require there is no
    substitute for Linux or a related operating system.

  8. Re: School Network

    ["Followup-To:" header set to comp.os.ms-windows.networking.windows.]
    Andrew Welham wrote:
    > I keep seeing people recommend Linux to some one who openly admits they
    > know nothing about the OS. Linux is a form of Unix and as anyone who
    > knows about Unix will say is not that easy to learn.


    In fact, at least one of the Linux distributions recommended (E-Smith)
    is extremely easy to learn as it has a very simple installation
    procedure and is entirely managed though a simple web interface.

    Linux and Windows are both general-purpose operationg systems and when
    approached in that manner, Windows is certainly easer to learn.
    However, Linux definitely scores when it comes to a range of specialised
    roles (as here) because it is much easier to customise and strip down.
    There is a significant number of specialist Linux distributions like
    this, developed by people with advanced technical skills but easily
    usable by people with more modest skills.

    --
    Bruce

    I see a mouse. Where? There, on the stair. And its clumsy wooden
    footwear makes it easy to trap and kill. -- Harry Hill

  9. Re: School Network

    Soni tempori elseu romani yeof helsforo nisson ol sefini ill des Sun, 13 Jun
    2004 19:14:48 +0100, sefini jorgo geanyet des mani yeof do
    uk.comp.home-networking, yawatina tan reek esk Andrew Welham
    fornis do marikano es bono tan el:

    >I keep seeing people recommend Linux to some one who openly admits they
    >know nothing about the OS. Linux is a form of Unix and as anyone who
    >knows about Unix will say is not that easy to learn.


    Linux is no easier or harder to learn than Windows. The main difficulty is
    that Linux is *different*, and so someone transferring from one to the other
    will feel it is harder. Someone starting from scratch will find Linux just as
    easy as they would Windows.

    >Linux is great but is not as easy as MS.


    Now that I have learnt both, and use both on a daily basis, I'd have to
    disagree. In fact, at work a few years ago, I set up a Linux machine in the
    staffroom. Nobody even realised it wasn't Windows.

    Also, do you mean "easier" in a user role, or in an admin role? As a
    workstation, or as a server? At the desktop or on the command line?

    deKay
    --
    + Lofi Gaming - www.lofi-gaming.org.uk
    |- ugvm Magazine - www.ugvm.org.uk
    |- My computer runs at 3.5MHz and I'm proud of that
    |- "CLART - YOU KNOWS IT"

  10. Re: School Network

    deKay wrote:
    > Soni tempori elseu romani yeof helsforo nisson ol sefini ill des Sun, 13 Jun
    > 2004 19:14:48 +0100, sefini jorgo geanyet des mani yeof do
    > uk.comp.home-networking, yawatina tan reek esk Andrew Welham
    > fornis do marikano es bono tan el:
    >
    >
    >>I keep seeing people recommend Linux to some one who openly admits they
    >>know nothing about the OS. Linux is a form of Unix and as anyone who
    >>knows about Unix will say is not that easy to learn.

    >
    >
    > Linux is no easier or harder to learn than Windows. The main difficulty is
    > that Linux is *different*, and so someone transferring from one to the other
    > will feel it is harder. Someone starting from scratch will find Linux just as
    > easy as they would Windows.
    >
    >
    >>Linux is great but is not as easy as MS.

    >
    >
    > Now that I have learnt both, and use both on a daily basis, I'd have to
    > disagree. In fact, at work a few years ago, I set up a Linux machine in the
    > staffroom. Nobody even realised it wasn't Windows.
    >
    > Also, do you mean "easier" in a user role, or in an admin role? As a
    > workstation, or as a server? At the desktop or on the command line?
    >
    > deKay


    Every one here is assuming every thing is GUI driven. This attitude
    really annoys me as any decent Unix/Linux admin will know, unix/linux is
    at it most flexible if you know its workings and configuration files,
    not just relying on the GUI. GUIs help but their not the answer to
    everything. This is the major difference between unix/linux and
    Microsoft operating systems, Microsoft operating systems are primarily
    GUI with some command line where as unix/linux are the opposite.


    Andrew

    --
    To reply via email, first reverse the address below then replace the
    (at) with @ and the (dot) with .
    moc(tod)xepip(tod)lsd(ta)spuorgswen_werdna

  11. Re: School Network

    Andrew Welham wrote:

    > deKay wrote:
    >
    >> Soni tempori elseu romani yeof helsforo nisson ol sefini ill des Sun,
    >> 13 Jun
    >> 2004 19:14:48 +0100, sefini jorgo geanyet des mani yeof do
    >> uk.comp.home-networking, yawatina tan reek esk Andrew Welham
    >> fornis do marikano es bono tan el:
    >>
    >>
    >>> I keep seeing people recommend Linux to some one who openly admits
    >>> they know nothing about the OS. Linux is a form of Unix and as anyone
    >>> who knows about Unix will say is not that easy to learn.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Linux is no easier or harder to learn than Windows. The main
    >> difficulty is
    >> that Linux is *different*, and so someone transferring from one to the
    >> other
    >> will feel it is harder. Someone starting from scratch will find Linux
    >> just as
    >> easy as they would Windows.
    >>
    >>
    >>> Linux is great but is not as easy as MS.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Now that I have learnt both, and use both on a daily basis, I'd have to
    >> disagree. In fact, at work a few years ago, I set up a Linux machine
    >> in the
    >> staffroom. Nobody even realised it wasn't Windows.
    >>
    >> Also, do you mean "easier" in a user role, or in an admin role? As a
    >> workstation, or as a server? At the desktop or on the command line?
    >>
    >> deKay

    >
    >
    > Every one here is assuming every thing is GUI driven. This attitude
    > really annoys me as any decent Unix/Linux admin will know, unix/linux is
    > at it most flexible if you know its workings and configuration files,
    > not just relying on the GUI. GUIs help but their not the answer to
    > everything. This is the major difference between unix/linux and
    > Microsoft operating systems, Microsoft operating systems are primarily
    > GUI with some command line where as unix/linux are the opposite.
    >
    >
    > Andrew
    >


    That's part of the reason you see so many cases involving editing the
    registry; the GUI is nice for what it does, but it only covers a small
    fraction of what's really needed.

    --
    The e-mail address in our reply-to line is reversed in an attempt to
    minimize spam. Our true address is of the form che...@prodigy.net.

  12. Re: School Network

    Andrew Welham wrote:

    >
    > Every one here is assuming every thing is GUI driven. This attitude
    > really annoys me as any decent Unix/Linux admin will know, unix/linux is
    > at it most flexible if you know its workings and configuration files,
    > not just relying on the GUI. GUIs help but their not the answer to
    > everything. This is the major difference between unix/linux and
    > Microsoft operating systems, Microsoft operating systems are primarily
    > GUI with some command line where as unix/linux are the opposite.
    >
    >
    > Andrew
    >


    GUI tools for almost everything in any any recent version major Linux
    distro -- but yes if you want do something special you have to use a
    file editor but the same is also true of Windows.
    Linux is advancing at a terrific pace same cannot be said of Window
    which has patches apon patches released almost dailly trying to keep it
    something like secure.

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