Novice Queries - Windows NT

This is a discussion on Novice Queries - Windows NT ; We are being 'expected' to upgrade our small 10 user infastructure (single domain) into Windows 2003. (Actually the choice could be 2000 also, but we have access to 2003 so thought why the hell not). Thats two of us, with ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Novice Queries

  1. Novice Queries


    We are being 'expected' to upgrade our small 10 user infastructure (single
    domain) into Windows 2003. (Actually the choice could be 2000 also, but we
    have access to 2003 so thought why the hell not). Thats two of us, with
    myself being assigned most responsibility for the move since the other
    person works offsite and has done no research so far.

    Training resources are limited (no official curriculum etc suggested) but
    whats available I have been taking note of as training materials and we will
    probably invest in some resource guides like the Official MS one.
    Some users have expressed interest that we keep the computer names in NEW
    domains, although Im not yet convinced and might even consider installing
    our new dell servers as DIFFERENT machine names, integrating into the
    existing domain under compatibility mode (then removing the old PDC when
    necessary).
    As far as Im concerned any application modifications required as a result,
    are inavoidable anyway as a result of the domain/machine name change.

    I am wondering regarding the best approach. We could set the new domain up
    seperate from the existing domain, or try and implement into it.
    I'm already playing with the setup of the Windows 2003 standard server in
    its own network, its things like DNS also that is confusing me.
    We have our DNS forwarded from our ISP so do we really need to have DNS
    installed here.
    I noticed a setting about just forwarding unresolved requests to an ISP
    forwarding address.
    Also what about the Primary DNS of the domain, I was just going to have a
    straight name like OURDOMAIN.COM and not bother with any sublevels since
    were mostly one big pot, no seperate physical areas or departments as such.
    although I suppose we could have something like MIDLANDS.OURDOMAIN.COM to
    indicate locality etc and (unlikely but) allow for future expansion perhaps?

    Is it safe to have the 2003 server on the same network (currently seperate
    domain name) as our existing infastructure do you think, given this is
    Active Directory?
    Also we have to upgrade Exchange from 5.5 in current domain to 2000 in this
    new domain. As the new machines dont have backup tapes thats a limitation of
    either burning cds or using network to get data across to them.

    Just very very cautious and nervious since this seems like a huge
    undertaking, it would help just to know which is the best method - to use NT
    compatible mode with different machine names to replace existing servers, or
    to retain server names and replace with complete new network servers.

    Any help thankful for, many many thanks.

    Regards,
    Tony



  2. Re: Novice Queries

    Tony,

    You may want to look at Windows Small Business Server 2003.. which can do
    alot of the configuration work for you.. SBS 2003 Standard Edition includes
    things like Windows Server 2003 Standard, Exchange Server 2003, Windows
    SharePoint Services etc.. SBS 2003 Premium edition also includes SQL Server
    2000, and Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2000..

    For more information check out..

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserv...s/default.mspx
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserv...s/default.mspx
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserv...l/default.mspx


    Keep an eye on the following url for a doc describing steps on how to
    migrate from NT v4.0 to SBS 2003 on different hardware..

    This document describes the process for migrating from Microsoft® Small
    Business Server 4.5 or Windows NT® Server 4.0 to Microsoft Windows® Small
    Business Server 2003.
    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...c-4f79ea73ec9c


    --

    Hope that helps,
    David Copeland
    Microsoft Small Business Server Support

    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.


    "Tony Foster" wrote in message
    news:vonumooiig1m53@corp.supernews.com...
    >
    > We are being 'expected' to upgrade our small 10 user infastructure (single
    > domain) into Windows 2003. (Actually the choice could be 2000 also, but we
    > have access to 2003 so thought why the hell not). Thats two of us, with
    > myself being assigned most responsibility for the move since the other
    > person works offsite and has done no research so far.
    >
    > Training resources are limited (no official curriculum etc suggested) but
    > whats available I have been taking note of as training materials and we

    will
    > probably invest in some resource guides like the Official MS one.
    > Some users have expressed interest that we keep the computer names in NEW
    > domains, although Im not yet convinced and might even consider installing
    > our new dell servers as DIFFERENT machine names, integrating into the
    > existing domain under compatibility mode (then removing the old PDC when
    > necessary).
    > As far as Im concerned any application modifications required as a result,
    > are inavoidable anyway as a result of the domain/machine name change.
    >
    > I am wondering regarding the best approach. We could set the new domain up
    > seperate from the existing domain, or try and implement into it.
    > I'm already playing with the setup of the Windows 2003 standard server in
    > its own network, its things like DNS also that is confusing me.
    > We have our DNS forwarded from our ISP so do we really need to have DNS
    > installed here.
    > I noticed a setting about just forwarding unresolved requests to an ISP
    > forwarding address.
    > Also what about the Primary DNS of the domain, I was just going to have a
    > straight name like OURDOMAIN.COM and not bother with any sublevels since
    > were mostly one big pot, no seperate physical areas or departments as

    such.
    > although I suppose we could have something like MIDLANDS.OURDOMAIN.COM to
    > indicate locality etc and (unlikely but) allow for future expansion

    perhaps?
    >
    > Is it safe to have the 2003 server on the same network (currently seperate
    > domain name) as our existing infastructure do you think, given this is
    > Active Directory?
    > Also we have to upgrade Exchange from 5.5 in current domain to 2000 in

    this
    > new domain. As the new machines dont have backup tapes thats a limitation

    of
    > either burning cds or using network to get data across to them.
    >
    > Just very very cautious and nervious since this seems like a huge
    > undertaking, it would help just to know which is the best method - to use

    NT
    > compatible mode with different machine names to replace existing servers,

    or
    > to retain server names and replace with complete new network servers.
    >
    > Any help thankful for, many many thanks.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Tony
    >
    >




  3. Re: Novice Queries

    David

    In case your wondering....we have MAPS for partners so that includes just
    2003 std, 2003 web, 2000 adv, and 2000 SBS (single license of each).
    It also includes other stuff like Exchange 2000 Enterprise etc. We already
    got SQL 2000 and the MAPS also includes the developer edition of this.
    I dont know much about the other technologies, but unlikely were that
    concerned about having them (sharepoint, Internet security etc).

    I am aware of the limitation of exchange but that was going on a seperate
    dell anyway, with the Windows 2000 advanced server license I think.
    I dont think we would go and buy SBS2003 without a good justification for
    the cost, (penny pinching managers but thanks anyway.

    Foot note/ Im not sure how clever it is to be reliant on MAPS for your core
    licenses (vs evaluation)....since MS effectively now make it manadatory to
    upgrade -> changes to their products covered under their latest MAPS
    licenses could change each annum. That makes us a bit like forced testers of
    their products I guess but thats the price of having partner software so
    cheap

    Thanks
    Tony

    "David Copeland [MSFT]" wrote in message
    news:#YA0FUmkDHA.1800@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > Tony,
    >
    > You may want to look at Windows Small Business Server 2003.. which can do
    > alot of the configuration work for you.. SBS 2003 Standard Edition

    includes
    > things like Windows Server 2003 Standard, Exchange Server 2003, Windows
    > SharePoint Services etc.. SBS 2003 Premium edition also includes SQL

    Server
    > 2000, and Internet Security and Acceleration Server 2000..
    >
    > For more information check out..
    >
    >

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserv...ures/default.m
    spx
    > http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserv...s/default.mspx
    >

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserv...l/default.mspx
    >
    >
    > Keep an eye on the following url for a doc describing steps on how to
    > migrate from NT v4.0 to SBS 2003 on different hardware..
    >
    > This document describes the process for migrating from Microsoft® Small
    > Business Server 4.5 or Windows NT® Server 4.0 to Microsoft Windows® Small
    > Business Server 2003.
    >

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/d...5d5-4dd1-41c3-
    930c-4f79ea73ec9c
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Hope that helps,
    > David Copeland
    > Microsoft Small Business Server Support
    >
    > This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no

    rights.
    >
    >
    > "Tony Foster" wrote in message
    > news:vonumooiig1m53@corp.supernews.com...
    > >
    > > We are being 'expected' to upgrade our small 10 user infastructure

    (single
    > > domain) into Windows 2003. (Actually the choice could be 2000 also, but

    we
    > > have access to 2003 so thought why the hell not). Thats two of us, with
    > > myself being assigned most responsibility for the move since the other
    > > person works offsite and has done no research so far.
    > >
    > > Training resources are limited (no official curriculum etc suggested)

    but
    > > whats available I have been taking note of as training materials and we

    > will
    > > probably invest in some resource guides like the Official MS one.
    > > Some users have expressed interest that we keep the computer names in

    NEW
    > > domains, although Im not yet convinced and might even consider

    installing
    > > our new dell servers as DIFFERENT machine names, integrating into the
    > > existing domain under compatibility mode (then removing the old PDC when
    > > necessary).
    > > As far as Im concerned any application modifications required as a

    result,
    > > are inavoidable anyway as a result of the domain/machine name change.
    > >
    > > I am wondering regarding the best approach. We could set the new domain

    up
    > > seperate from the existing domain, or try and implement into it.
    > > I'm already playing with the setup of the Windows 2003 standard server

    in
    > > its own network, its things like DNS also that is confusing me.
    > > We have our DNS forwarded from our ISP so do we really need to have DNS


    > > installed here.
    > > I noticed a setting about just forwarding unresolved requests to an ISP
    > > forwarding address.
    > > Also what about the Primary DNS of the domain, I was just going to have

    a
    > > straight name like OURDOMAIN.COM and not bother with any sublevels since
    > > were mostly one big pot, no seperate physical areas or departments as

    > such.
    > > although I suppose we could have something like MIDLANDS.OURDOMAIN.COM

    to
    > > indicate locality etc and (unlikely but) allow for future expansion

    > perhaps?
    > >
    > > Is it safe to have the 2003 server on the same network (currently

    seperate
    > > domain name) as our existing infastructure do you think, given this is
    > > Active Directory?
    > > Also we have to upgrade Exchange from 5.5 in current domain to 2000 in

    > this
    > > new domain. As the new machines dont have backup tapes thats a

    limitation
    > of
    > > either burning cds or using network to get data across to them.
    > >
    > > Just very very cautious and nervious since this seems like a huge
    > > undertaking, it would help just to know which is the best method - to

    use
    > NT
    > > compatible mode with different machine names to replace existing

    servers,
    > or
    > > to retain server names and replace with complete new network servers.
    > >
    > > Any help thankful for, many many thanks.
    > >
    > > Regards,
    > > Tony
    > >
    > >

    >
    >




  4. Re: Novice Queries

    sounds like you need serious help here, contact http://cahanconsulting.com
    to set it up for you.


    "Tony Foster" wrote in message
    news:vonumooiig1m53@corp.supernews.com...
    >
    > We are being 'expected' to upgrade our small 10 user infastructure (single
    > domain) into Windows 2003. (Actually the choice could be 2000 also, but we
    > have access to 2003 so thought why the hell not). Thats two of us, with
    > myself being assigned most responsibility for the move since the other
    > person works offsite and has done no research so far.
    >
    > Training resources are limited (no official curriculum etc suggested) but
    > whats available I have been taking note of as training materials and we

    will
    > probably invest in some resource guides like the Official MS one.
    > Some users have expressed interest that we keep the computer names in NEW
    > domains, although Im not yet convinced and might even consider installing
    > our new dell servers as DIFFERENT machine names, integrating into the
    > existing domain under compatibility mode (then removing the old PDC when
    > necessary).
    > As far as Im concerned any application modifications required as a result,
    > are inavoidable anyway as a result of the domain/machine name change.
    >
    > I am wondering regarding the best approach. We could set the new domain up
    > seperate from the existing domain, or try and implement into it.
    > I'm already playing with the setup of the Windows 2003 standard server in
    > its own network, its things like DNS also that is confusing me.
    > We have our DNS forwarded from our ISP so do we really need to have DNS
    > installed here.
    > I noticed a setting about just forwarding unresolved requests to an ISP
    > forwarding address.
    > Also what about the Primary DNS of the domain, I was just going to have a
    > straight name like OURDOMAIN.COM and not bother with any sublevels since
    > were mostly one big pot, no seperate physical areas or departments as

    such.
    > although I suppose we could have something like MIDLANDS.OURDOMAIN.COM to
    > indicate locality etc and (unlikely but) allow for future expansion

    perhaps?
    >
    > Is it safe to have the 2003 server on the same network (currently seperate
    > domain name) as our existing infastructure do you think, given this is
    > Active Directory?
    > Also we have to upgrade Exchange from 5.5 in current domain to 2000 in

    this
    > new domain. As the new machines dont have backup tapes thats a limitation

    of
    > either burning cds or using network to get data across to them.
    >
    > Just very very cautious and nervious since this seems like a huge
    > undertaking, it would help just to know which is the best method - to use

    NT
    > compatible mode with different machine names to replace existing servers,

    or
    > to retain server names and replace with complete new network servers.
    >
    > Any help thankful for, many many thanks.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Tony
    >
    >




+ Reply to Thread