multiple ip addresses for one server - Windows NT

This is a discussion on multiple ip addresses for one server - Windows NT ; 1) I have a machine to which I assign multiple ip addresses.I browse to an external website like www.cnn.com . Which IP address will this computer use to connect to the remote website. Does the machine simply choose the first ...

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  1. multiple ip addresses for one server

    1) I have a machine to which I assign multiple ip addresses.I browse
    to an external website like www.cnn.com.

    Which IP address will this computer use to connect to the remote
    website. Does the machine simply choose the first ip address listed?


    2) How does TCP/IP work? When connecting to a website, I thought all
    communications were through port 80 (http). I read somewhere that the
    request is made on port 80 but the server then chooses some other
    random port to communicate back. Where can I read more about this.


    Thanks,
    -tom

  2. Re: multiple ip addresses for one server

    In article <5cf0e3b0.0309091939.1a5ce511@posting.google.com>,
    thomas_rp@hotmail.com (Thomas Abraham) wrote:
    >1) I have a machine to which I assign multiple ip addresses.I browse
    >to an external website like www.cnn.com.
    >
    >Which IP address will this computer use to connect to the remote
    >website. Does the machine simply choose the first ip address listed?


    No - it follows what the routing table tells it. Try "route print" from the
    command prompt. The IP stack will connect from whichever gives the most
    restrictive match to your request. If it finds multiple matches, then it'll
    pick the first.

    >2) How does TCP/IP work? When connecting to a website, I thought all
    >communications were through port 80 (http). I read somewhere that the
    >request is made on port 80 but the server then chooses some other
    >random port to communicate back. Where can I read more about this.


    You can read more about this from any number of posts from people who
    haven't been paying attention in their "Understanding TCP/IP" class.

    Servers don't jump ports like this. When you connect to a server that is
    listening at port 80, every one of your packets on that connection will have
    a destination port of 80. And every one of the packets you receive back
    will have a source port of 80.

    Alun.
    ~~~~

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