Zip-disk data file-recovery - Windows NT

This is a discussion on Zip-disk data file-recovery - Windows NT ; I work at the Univ. of Rochester Medical Center. One of our lab researchers made a backup of some data, 100MB worth of mainly ".tif" files before our ISD department wiped a computer hard drive and installed Windows 2000. The ...

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Thread: Zip-disk data file-recovery

  1. Zip-disk data file-recovery

    I work at the Univ. of Rochester Medical Center.

    One of our lab researchers made a backup of some data, 100MB worth of
    mainly ".tif" files before our ISD department wiped a computer hard
    drive and installed Windows 2000. The operating system had been
    running Windows 98. When the Zip was inserted into the computer to
    restore the files, the Zip registered as full, but 78.5MB of the files
    were not visible. We tried to get the files on a Win98 computer, but
    that didn't work; thus, I suspect that Win2k did something to the
    Zip-disk when it was inserted. Norton Tools was run on the Zip, and
    "Recovered" a total of 112 "file fragments". These fragments probably
    represent the 50 or so files which we would like pieced back together
    into their original tif format. Is this possible. What programs could
    we use to do this? How much would such a service -- if one is
    available -- cost? If it's possible, what would the turn-around time
    be? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Sincerely,
    David Heinrich

  2. Re: Zip-disk data file-recovery


    dh003i wrote:

    > I work at the Univ. of Rochester Medical Center.
    >
    > One of our lab researchers made a backup of some data, 100MB worth of
    > mainly ".tif" files before our ISD department wiped a computer hard
    > drive and installed Windows 2000. The operating system had been
    > running Windows 98. When the Zip was inserted into the computer to
    > restore the files, the Zip registered as full, but 78.5MB of the files
    > were not visible. We tried to get the files on a Win98 computer, but
    > that didn't work; thus, I suspect that Win2k did something to the
    > Zip-disk when it was inserted. Norton Tools was run on the Zip, and
    > "Recovered" a total of 112 "file fragments". These fragments probably
    > represent the 50 or so files which we would like pieced back together
    > into their original tif format. Is this possible. What programs could
    > we use to do this? How much would such a service -- if one is
    > available -- cost? If it's possible, what would the turn-around time
    > be? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Sincerely,
    > David Heinrich


    How were the files backed up to the ZIP disk --- by using Iomega's backup
    utility or some other? Or were these files put in the ZIP disk as uncompressed
    *.tif files. It is doubtful that Windows 2000 did anything to the ZIP disk as it is
    native to it. On the other hand, if a backup/restore application were used, then
    there might be problems since restoring a backup usually implies returning the
    files to the system from which it had originated (or to a twin of it). Looks like
    a job for a professional data recovery outfit.


  3. Re: Zip-disk data file-recovery

    They were just copied directly from the hard-disk to the zip-disk. No
    back-up program was used.

    > How were the files backed up to the ZIP disk


  4. Re: Zip-disk data file-recovery


    David Heinrich wrote:

    > They were just copied directly from the hard-disk to the zip-disk. No
    > back-up program was used.
    >


    Should not have become an issue provided that the ZIP disk had remained
    with its original formatting or re-formatting via Iomegaware. Unless the files
    had extraordinarily long file names, the approx. 50 *.tif files should not have
    filled the root directory or ultimately corrupted it. But because the Windows
    2000, as a follower of Windows NT, is a more precise, hardware-oriented
    OS, I would see whether or not the ZIP disk is still good in another Windows
    98 machine before asking for professional recovery assistance.

    And BTW, having a backup implies that there are always at least *2* copies
    of the files in existence, preferably on different media.


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