Linux vs. Windows for voting systems? - Windows CE

This is a discussion on Linux vs. Windows for voting systems? - Windows CE ; Computerized voting systems (aka DREs or Direct Recording Electronic) must be based on an operating system, for example, Windows or Linux. Linux has the advantage of being open so that all the source code can be open. Windows source code ...

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Thread: Linux vs. Windows for voting systems?

  1. Linux vs. Windows for voting systems?

    Computerized voting systems (aka DREs or Direct Recording Electronic)
    must be based on an operating system, for example, Windows or Linux.

    Linux has the advantage of being open so that all the source code can
    be open. Windows source code will not be opened to anyone.

    Some people have argued that the basic Windows operating system can
    remain secret as long as the voting application program (i.e. C,
    Python, etc) is open.

    Here are some questions about such an arrangement.

    1. Could someone tamper with the Windows OS or put in some additional
    code that would not be found in an inspection of the application
    program that could alter the results?

    2. Could viruses and other malware affect the OS and, ultimately, an
    election without its effects being detected by examining the
    application program?

    Any other comments are welcome.

    Thanks,
    Bill Edelstein
    Baltimore, MD


  2. Re: Linux vs. Windows for voting systems?

    resonator80 wrote:
    > Computerized voting systems (aka DREs or Direct Recording
    > Electronic) must be based on an operating system, for example,
    > Windows or Linux.
    >
    > Linux has the advantage of being open so that all the source code
    > can be open. Windows source code will not be opened to anyone.
    >
    > Some people have argued that the basic Windows operating system can
    > remain secret as long as the voting application program (i.e. C,
    > Python, etc) is open.
    >
    > Here are some questions about such an arrangement.
    >
    > 1. Could someone tamper with the Windows OS or put in some
    > additional code that would not be found in an inspection of the
    > application program that could alter the results?
    >
    > 2. Could viruses and other malware affect the OS and, ultimately, an
    > election without its effects being detected by examining the
    > application program?
    >
    > Any other comments are welcome.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Bill Edelstein
    > Baltimore, MD


    Homework assignment?

    1) Possibly - any OS/software could be affected this way.
    2) Possibly - again any OS/software could be affected this way.

    You'd have to be much more detailed in order to be able to give a definitive
    answer. After all - who is examining the application/operating system? How
    is it secured physically and with software? Is it on a network or not? How
    is the data collected stored? Is it ever transferred anywhere? etc and so
    on.

    --
    Shenan Stanley
    MS-MVP
    --
    How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html



  3. Re: Linux vs. Windows for voting systems?

    Any OS can be tampered with.
    It would be easier in some ways to rig an 'Open' system and or software
    simply because the source is there for anyone to see.
    Therefore they know how it works and where to make any changes without easy
    discovery. The trick is injecting any changes back into the target system.

    JS

    "resonator80" wrote in message
    news:1184527231.984104.175800@k79g2000hse.googlegr oups.com...
    > Computerized voting systems (aka DREs or Direct Recording Electronic)
    > must be based on an operating system, for example, Windows or Linux.
    >
    > Linux has the advantage of being open so that all the source code can
    > be open. Windows source code will not be opened to anyone.
    >
    > Some people have argued that the basic Windows operating system can
    > remain secret as long as the voting application program (i.e. C,
    > Python, etc) is open.
    >
    > Here are some questions about such an arrangement.
    >
    > 1. Could someone tamper with the Windows OS or put in some additional
    > code that would not be found in an inspection of the application
    > program that could alter the results?
    >
    > 2. Could viruses and other malware affect the OS and, ultimately, an
    > election without its effects being detected by examining the
    > application program?
    >
    > Any other comments are welcome.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Bill Edelstein
    > Baltimore, MD
    >




  4. Re: Linux vs. Windows for voting systems?

    The OS is immaterial, the system must be easily verifiable, say MD5
    against the code. AND some form of hardcopy documentation of the ballots
    cast, display it to the current voter, when they cast the vote it can
    not be cleared, microprinting and a reader would take care of recount.

    resonator80 wrote:

    > Computerized voting systems (aka DREs or Direct Recording Electronic)
    > must be based on an operating system, for example, Windows or Linux.
    >
    > Linux has the advantage of being open so that all the source code can
    > be open. Windows source code will not be opened to anyone.
    >
    > Some people have argued that the basic Windows operating system can
    > remain secret as long as the voting application program (i.e. C,
    > Python, etc) is open.
    >
    > Here are some questions about such an arrangement.
    >
    > 1. Could someone tamper with the Windows OS or put in some additional
    > code that would not be found in an inspection of the application
    > program that could alter the results?
    >
    > 2. Could viruses and other malware affect the OS and, ultimately, an
    > election without its effects being detected by examining the
    > application program?
    >
    > Any other comments are welcome.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Bill Edelstein
    > Baltimore, MD
    >



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