Slow login due to usage of page deriviation? - Websphere

This is a discussion on Slow login due to usage of page deriviation? - Websphere ; Hello, We are building a new virtual portal and are using the feature to have newly created pages reference an existing page quite intensive. Each portal page is derived from a 'section-specific-template', which is derived from template with some navigation ...

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Thread: Slow login due to usage of page deriviation?

  1. Slow login due to usage of page deriviation?

    Hello,

    We are building a new virtual portal and are using the feature to have newly created pages reference an existing page quite intensive. Each portal page is derived from a 'section-specific-template', which is derived from template with some navigation portlet, which is derived from a layout-template. We need such a nesting structure, because various persons have different editor/manager rights at each level.

    We are starting to notice that the login-process starts to take an huge amount of time. (up to 30seconds)
    Our monitor has shown +/- 16.000 calls to the database and a lot of JVM time spend in the WebSphere Portal | Engine | Load pages. We know that to determine if a page is available for a user, the user also must have access to all the templates, which it has been derived from.

    IMHO Our portal doesn't have an excessive amount of pages yet (+/- 600), but the login process already starts to slow down.

    Does anybody know if there are options for us to speed up the login-process, during which portal determines which pages should be available in the navigation?

    Any suggestion is more then welcome!

    With kind regards,
    Marco Beelen



    {1}: [http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infoce...mmgpages.html]

  2. Re: Slow login due to usage of page deriviation?

    First of all, you should always try to simplify what's on the login "landing" page, which is the first page shown right after the login. If you have a complicated navigation scheme, or data requests, try to move them to secondary pages, not on the first landing page.

    Second, are you sure the long login is due to the page derivations you have? You can enable Engine and PUMA traces to estimate whether it's the real login process or the page rendering that takes the majority of the time.

    Third, does the login always take the same amount of time roughly? or the subsequent ones takes less? Have you tried different user IDs?

    If in-depth analysis is needed, it's better to have a PMR open.

    -FF

  3. Re: Slow login due to usage of page deriviation?

    Hi, sorry to interrupt in this message, but I've been wondering if the login process could be improved after editing the access-controls of the different pages? I guess that if a page have roles applied to users/groups that are not used that could increase the number of database queries to set the user privileges at the login process. So, editing all the access-controls and deleting those that are not necessary could help. Am I right?

  4. Re: Slow login due to usage of page deriviation?

    In general, yes.

    Some guidelines are:
    - Keep the access control configurations as simple as possible
    - Minimize the number of user groups
    - Minimize the number of different groups to which the users belong
    - Avoid nested group hierarchies and depth of the nested groups
    - Avoid doing access control administration while the system is under heavy load
    - Limit the use of external access control
    
    -FF

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