vxworks device drivers - VxWorks

This is a discussion on vxworks device drivers - VxWorks ; Hi all, A small doubt in Vxworks device drivers. In Vxworks for a device to be used first the Device driver must be initialised and the device must be created. Can we use a device by directly configuring it by ...

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  1. vxworks device drivers

    Hi all,

    A small doubt in Vxworks device drivers.

    In Vxworks for a device to be used first the Device driver must be
    initialised and the device must be created.

    Can we use a device by directly configuring it by accessing its
    registers and declaring a function as ISR to device interrupt ( in
    userappinit before my application starts ).If we can do in this method
    what is the diffrence diffrence between two methods.


    sai kumar reddy


  2. Re: vxworks device drivers


    Reddy,

    There is no user space and kernal space in vxworks like linux.
    Every thing will be treated as same space. Almost you can access low
    level calls from your application thats why you can create device in
    device table and can register ISR from application.

    Driver is layer which will provide interface to access
    hardware.It will reduce overhead of application developer.If
    application developer knows what are all the function available in
    driver, then he can fullfill his task.No need to worry about hardware
    mapping ,register details,ISR registeration....

    Speaking myself...


  3. Re: vxworks device drivers

    Hi:

    I guess it's depends on what you are trying to do. If you want to
    write a vxWorks device driver, you have to define all the standard
    driver entry points (open, close, read, write, ioctl, etc), and call
    the iosLib routines to add the entry point to the io system and give
    the device a name (ie /ata0) that will allow a user to acces it via
    normal io calls (like read, write, etc).

    Alternatively, you can make up your own user API and just write enough
    code to make the thing work - or just do "*(register)= ___;" in the
    middle of you application. Either one can work. Just depends on your
    goals.

    Note that to do a standard vxWorks device driver, you can still compile
    it separately, and init it up from a startup script or the command
    line. There is no requirement to put all the device drivers in a
    kernel.

    lc
    reddy.saikumar@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi all,
    >
    > A small doubt in Vxworks device drivers.
    >
    > In Vxworks for a device to be used first the Device driver must be
    > initialised and the device must be created.
    >
    > Can we use a device by directly configuring it by accessing its
    > registers and declaring a function as ISR to device interrupt ( in
    > userappinit before my application starts ).If we can do in this method
    > what is the diffrence diffrence between two methods.
    >
    >
    > sai kumar reddy



  4. Re: vxworks device drivers

    LarryC wrote:

    >Hi:
    >
    >I guess it's depends on what you are trying to do. If you want to
    >write a vxWorks device driver, you have to define all the standard
    >driver entry points (open, close, read, write, ioctl, etc), and call
    >the iosLib routines to add the entry point to the io system and give
    >the device a name (ie /ata0) that will allow a user to acces it via
    >normal io calls (like read, write, etc).
    >
    >Alternatively, you can make up your own user API and just write enough
    >code to make the thing work - or just do "*(register)= ___;" in the
    >middle of you application. Either one can work. Just depends on your
    >goals.


    True, and mostly the goal it depends on is portability, but even if you
    don't care about portability, writing device drivers adds structure to
    systems.

    >Note that to do a standard vxWorks device driver, you can still compile
    >it separately, and init it up from a startup script or the command
    >line. There is no requirement to put all the device drivers in a
    >kernel.


    Again true, and it's good to write the component definition files to
    facilitate configuring the drivers in or out.

    --
    ================================================== ======================
    Michael Kesti | "And like, one and one don't make
    | two, one and one make one."
    mrkesti at hotmail dot com | - The Who, Bargain

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