Most impressive VAX installations - VMS

This is a discussion on Most impressive VAX installations - VMS ; Bob Koehler wrote: (snip) > The 11/780 did, as an option. You had to buy both an optional user > writeable control store, and the optional microcode to be loaded into > it. I remember doing testing on my second ...

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Thread: Most impressive VAX installations

  1. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    Bob Koehler wrote:
    (snip)

    > The 11/780 did, as an option. You had to buy both an optional user
    > writeable control store, and the optional microcode to be loaded into
    > it. I remember doing testing on my second 11/780 to see if it was
    > worth it.


    I don't know this one at all.

    > IIRC, the 11/782 and 11/785 had the same options. I think the 11/750
    > shipped with the H- and G-float microcode, but I don't recall how
    > it was handled on the 11/730 and 11/725.


    Around then I worked in a place with three 11/750's and one 11/730.

    It was well known that the 730 was faster for H-float, as it was
    emulated on the 750. It might be, though, that the 750 had both
    G-float and D-float microcode, if that was an option.

    As I understood it at the time, it was standard on the 730.

    -- glen


  2. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    Bob Koehler wrote:
    (snip)

    > In C speak, float would be done in VAX F-float or IEEE S-float, or
    > similar. double would be done in VAX D- or G-float, or IEEE T-float.
    > I don't know of any C compiler that supports VAX H-float or IEEE
    > X-float.


    The convention is that it would be (long double), though I don't
    know which systems have compilers that implement it.

    -- glen


  3. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    On Sat, 01 Nov 2008 15:01:03 -0400, Arne Vajh°j
    wrote in <490ca76d$0$90264$14726298@news.sunsite.dk>:
    > JF Mezei wrote:
    >> At the opposite scale of things...


    >> I ran an all mighty Microvax 2 with 8 megs of RAM and a 154meg drive to
    >> support 8 users runing WPS-Plus. The success of the project lead the
    >> MVII to be upgraded to 16 meg of RAM to support 12 users.


    >> This was circa 1987.


    > And today a single word processing user is using a PC
    > with 4 MB L2 cache, 2 GB RAM and 320 GB disk ...


    > HW has changed !


    Not everybody has a single-user PC, tho'.

    [ireid:~] > top
    top - 08:16:57 up 55 days, 13:54, 75 users, load average: 2.23, 0.95, 0.72
    Tasks: 648 total, 1 running, 643 sleeping, 3 stopped, 1 zombie
    Cpu0 : 1.7% us, 1.0% sy, 0.0% ni, 96.9% id, 0.0% wa, 0.0% hi, 0.3% si
    Cpu1 : 0.0% us, 0.3% sy, 0.0% ni, 0.0% id, 99.7% wa, 0.0% hi, 0.0% si
    Cpu2 : 0.0% us, 0.3% sy, 0.0% ni, 99.7% id, 0.0% wa, 0.0% hi, 0.0% si
    Cpu3 : 0.0% us, 0.7% sy, 0.0% ni, 0.0% id, 95.6% wa, 0.3% hi, 3.4% si
    Mem: 8162216k total, 7465120k used, 697096k free, 811288k buffers
    Swap: 16771520k total, 136920k used, 16634600k free, 4377612k cached
    ....
    [ireid:~] > cat /proc/cpuinfo
    processor : 0
    vendor_id : GenuineIntel
    cpu family : 6
    model : 15
    model name : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU 5160 @ 3.00GHz
    stepping : 6
    cpu MHz : 2992.598
    cache size : 4096 KB
    ....

    There'll be more users later in the day of course. I'm not sure
    how many machines are actually in the lxplus cluster; at least four.
    This is at CERN, natuerlich.

    [ireid:~] > uname -a
    Linux lxplus235.cern.ch 2.6.9-78.0.1.EL.cernsmp #1 SMP Tue Aug 5 11:01:13 CEST
    2008 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

    --
    Ivan Reid, School of Engineering & Design, _____________ CMS Collaboration,
    Brunel University. Ivan.Reid@[brunel.ac.uk|cern.ch] Room 40-1-B12, CERN
    KotPT -- "for stupidity above and beyond the call of duty".

  4. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    Bob Eager wrote:
    > On Mon, 3 Nov 2008 18:32:08 UTC, "Richard B. Gilbert"
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Bob Eager wrote:
    >>> On Mon, 3 Nov 2008 15:06:49 UTC, DaveG
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I remember a DF32 we had installed on a PDP-12 back in the 70s. Heads
    >>>> did not move, the platter was very large by today's standards, but in
    >>>> its time, it was pretty fast. I'm showing my age. So is Kerry. ;-)
    >>> We had a fixed head disk in about 1973, on a PDP-11/20. As I recall, we
    >>> had to avoid switching it off too often as it wore out the heads (or so
    >>> we were told). Thought it was a DF32 but it was larger - was rolled out
    >>> onto TWO DECtapes!
    >>>

    >> There was a shop on RT 130 just south of Hightstown, NJ where I saw a
    >> disk platter that must have been three to four FEET in diameter!
    >> Ancient technology of course.

    >
    > Oh, I've seen a few of those over the years...last one was in someone's
    > office at Edinburgh University.


    Thought I recognised the name (Bob, EMAS at Univ of Kent ?).

    The disk you refer to is probably one of the EMAS Large Disk platters
    pictured here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ed_comp_hist/532590983/

    EMAS was what I grew up on ;-)

  5. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    In article <4910163a$0$90276$14726298@news.sunsite.dk>, "R.A.Omond" writes:
    >Bob Eager wrote:
    >> On Mon, 3 Nov 2008 18:32:08 UTC, "Richard B. Gilbert"
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Bob Eager wrote:
    >>>> On Mon, 3 Nov 2008 15:06:49 UTC, DaveG
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> I remember a DF32 we had installed on a PDP-12 back in the 70s. Heads
    >>>>> did not move, the platter was very large by today's standards, but in
    >>>>> its time, it was pretty fast. I'm showing my age. So is Kerry. ;-)
    >>>> We had a fixed head disk in about 1973, on a PDP-11/20. As I recall, we
    >>>> had to avoid switching it off too often as it wore out the heads (or so
    >>>> we were told). Thought it was a DF32 but it was larger - was rolled out
    >>>> onto TWO DECtapes!
    >>>>
    >>> There was a shop on RT 130 just south of Hightstown, NJ where I saw a
    >>> disk platter that must have been three to four FEET in diameter!
    >>> Ancient technology of course.

    >>
    >> Oh, I've seen a few of those over the years...last one was in someone's
    >> office at Edinburgh University.

    >
    >Thought I recognised the name (Bob, EMAS at Univ of Kent ?).
    >
    >The disk you refer to is probably one of the EMAS Large Disk platters
    >pictured here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ed_comp_hist/532590983/


    Great collection of some old kit in photos there. It's a shame that some
    of them are too dark to show them in better detail.

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    .... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    Copr. 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Publication of _this_ usenet article outside
    of usenet _must_ include its contents in its entirety including this copyright
    notice, disclaimer and quotations.

  6. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    On Tue, 4 Nov 2008 09:30:33 UTC, "R.A.Omond"
    wrote:

    > Bob Eager wrote:
    > > On Mon, 3 Nov 2008 18:32:08 UTC, "Richard B. Gilbert"
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> Bob Eager wrote:
    > >>> On Mon, 3 Nov 2008 15:06:49 UTC, DaveG
    > >>> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>> I remember a DF32 we had installed on a PDP-12 back in the 70s. Heads
    > >>>> did not move, the platter was very large by today's standards, but in
    > >>>> its time, it was pretty fast. I'm showing my age. So is Kerry. ;-)
    > >>> We had a fixed head disk in about 1973, on a PDP-11/20. As I recall, we
    > >>> had to avoid switching it off too often as it wore out the heads (or so
    > >>> we were told). Thought it was a DF32 but it was larger - was rolled out
    > >>> onto TWO DECtapes!
    > >>>
    > >> There was a shop on RT 130 just south of Hightstown, NJ where I saw a
    > >> disk platter that must have been three to four FEET in diameter!
    > >> Ancient technology of course.

    > >
    > > Oh, I've seen a few of those over the years...last one was in someone's
    > > office at Edinburgh University.

    >
    > Thought I recognised the name (Bob, EMAS at Univ of Kent ?).
    >
    > The disk you refer to is probably one of the EMAS Large Disk platters
    > pictured here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ed_comp_hist/532590983/
    >
    > EMAS was what I grew up on ;-)


    Yes, that's the one! Were you at Kent or Edinburgh? Name seems vaguely
    familiar!

    I implemented EMAS on the IBM 4381 but they decided a VAXcluster was
    cheaper...
    --
    Bob Eager
    Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
    http://www.mirrorservice.org


  7. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    Bob Eager wrote:
    > [...snip...]
    >
    > Yes, that's the one! Were you at Kent or Edinburgh?


    Edinburgh; graduated in '78.

  8. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    On Tue, 4 Nov 2008 14:18:20 UTC, "R.A.Omond"
    wrote:

    > Bob Eager wrote:
    > > [...snip...]
    > >
    > > Yes, that's the one! Were you at Kent or Edinburgh?

    >
    > Edinburgh; graduated in '78.


    Oh...surprised you'd heard about me, then! :-)
    --
    Bob Eager
    Use the BIG mirror service in the UK:
    http://www.mirrorservice.org


  9. Re: Most impressive VAX installations


    "Bob Koehler" wrote in message >
    In C speak, float would be done in VAX F-float or IEEE S-float, or
    > similar. double would be done in VAX D- or G-float, or IEEE T-float.
    > I don't know of any C compiler that supports VAX H-float or IEEE
    > X-float.


    "long double" on OpenVMS Alpha or OpenVMS I64 should get you X-float. I
    don't think the VAX compiler knows about H-float however.

    >
    > In Fortran, REAL or REAL*4 would be F-float or S-float. DOUBLE
    > PRECISION or REAL*8 would be D-, G-, or T-float. REAL*16 would
    > be H- or X-float. I don't know of any Fortran compiler that
    > supports X-float.


    REAL*16 on OpenVMS Alpha and OpenVMS I64 should get you X-float.

    And for those of you keeping score at home, the QUADRUPLE datatype in Pascal
    gives H-float on VAX, and X-float on Alpha and I64.

    John



  10. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    In article , "John Reagan" writes:
    >
    > "Bob Koehler" wrote in message >
    > In C speak, float would be done in VAX F-float or IEEE S-float, or
    >> similar. double would be done in VAX D- or G-float, or IEEE T-float.
    >> I don't know of any C compiler that supports VAX H-float or IEEE
    >> X-float.

    >
    > "long double" on OpenVMS Alpha or OpenVMS I64 should get you X-float. I
    > don't think the VAX compiler knows about H-float however.


    What about if I'm not compiling with IEEE on my Alpha. Will "long
    double" get me H-float?


  11. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    In article , koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes:
    >In article , "John Reagan" writes:
    >>
    >> "Bob Koehler" wrote in message >
    >> In C speak, float would be done in VAX F-float or IEEE S-float, or
    >>> similar. double would be done in VAX D- or G-float, or IEEE T-float.
    >>> I don't know of any C compiler that supports VAX H-float or IEEE
    >>> X-float.

    >>
    >> "long double" on OpenVMS Alpha or OpenVMS I64 should get you X-float. I
    >> don't think the VAX compiler knows about H-float however.

    >
    > What about if I'm not compiling with IEEE on my Alpha. Will "long
    > double" get me H-float?


    If it does, it would be emulated in or provided by some library.


    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    .... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    Copr. 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Publication of _this_ usenet article outside
    of usenet _must_ include its contents in its entirety including this copyright
    notice, disclaimer and quotations.

  12. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    Glen Herrmannsfeldt wrote:
    > Bob Koehler wrote:
    > (snip)
    >
    >> In C speak, float would be done in VAX F-float or IEEE S-float, or
    >> similar. double would be done in VAX D- or G-float, or IEEE T-float.
    >> I don't know of any C compiler that supports VAX H-float or IEEE
    >> X-float.

    >
    > The convention is that it would be (long double), though I don't
    > know which systems have compilers that implement it.


    DEC C 6.5 on Alpha has long double = X-float.

    Arne

  13. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    Bob Koehler wrote:
    > In article , "John Reagan" writes:
    >> "Bob Koehler" wrote in message >
    >> In C speak, float would be done in VAX F-float or IEEE S-float, or
    >>> similar. double would be done in VAX D- or G-float, or IEEE T-float.
    >>> I don't know of any C compiler that supports VAX H-float or IEEE
    >>> X-float.

    >> "long double" on OpenVMS Alpha or OpenVMS I64 should get you X-float. I
    >> don't think the VAX compiler knows about H-float however.

    >
    > What about if I'm not compiling with IEEE on my Alpha. Will "long
    > double" get me H-float?


    No. Always X on Alpha.

    Arne

  14. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG wrote:
    > In article , koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes:
    >> In article , "John Reagan" writes:
    >>> "Bob Koehler" wrote in message >
    >>> In C speak, float would be done in VAX F-float or IEEE S-float, or
    >>>> similar. double would be done in VAX D- or G-float, or IEEE T-float.
    >>>> I don't know of any C compiler that supports VAX H-float or IEEE
    >>>> X-float.
    >>> "long double" on OpenVMS Alpha or OpenVMS I64 should get you X-float. I
    >>> don't think the VAX compiler knows about H-float however.

    >> What about if I'm not compiling with IEEE on my Alpha. Will "long
    >> double" get me H-float?

    >
    > If it does, it would be emulated in or provided by some library.


    It is X. But that is also emulated.

    Arne

  15. Re: Most impressive VAX installations


    "Bob Koehler" wrote in message

    >
    > What about if I'm not compiling with IEEE on my Alpha. Will "long
    > double" get me H-float?
    >


    As Arne mentioned, you'll always get X. Other than binary compatibility
    with VAX, H doesn't buy you anything that X doesn't provide.

    On Alpha and I64, you can pick between

    F/D/X
    F/G/X
    S/T/X

    for real, double, long double, respectively. Only the defaults have changed
    from Alpha to I64 [and the comparative speeds since F/D/G on I64 involve
    converting to/from S/T].

    John



  16. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    John Reagan wrote:
    (snip)

    > On Alpha and I64, you can pick between


    > F/D/X
    > F/G/X
    > S/T/X


    > for real, double, long double, respectively. Only the defaults have changed
    > from Alpha to I64 [and the comparative speeds since F/D/G on I64 involve
    > converting to/from S/T].


    As I understand it, F, D, and G on Alpha also involve conversion to S/T,
    but the conversion is done in hardware. The load/store instructions load
    F, D , or G from memory into S or T form in registers, and do the reverse
    on store instructions.

    -- glen


  17. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    Glen Herrmannsfeldt wrote:
    > John Reagan wrote:
    > (snip)
    >
    >> On Alpha and I64, you can pick between

    >
    >> F/D/X
    >> F/G/X
    >> S/T/X

    >
    >> for real, double, long double, respectively. Only the defaults have
    >> changed from Alpha to I64 [and the comparative speeds since F/D/G on
    >> I64 involve converting to/from S/T].

    >
    > As I understand it, F, D, and G on Alpha also involve conversion to S/T,
    > but the conversion is done in hardware. The load/store instructions load
    > F, D , or G from memory into S or T form in registers, and do the reverse
    > on store instructions.
    >


    F/G and S/T both look the same in registers and are very
    similar in memory format also. Field sizes are all the same,
    it's just a question of order. All are supported natively.

    Limited D support is offered by using a LDG (LoaD G_floating)
    to get the D value into a register and then using the CVTDG
    and CVTGD instructions to convert between the two. So, you
    get D, but less three bits of precision.

    Tim.

  18. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    In article , Glen Herrmannsfeldt writes:
    >
    > As I understand it, F, D, and G on Alpha also involve conversion to S/T,
    > but the conversion is done in hardware. The load/store instructions load
    > F, D , or G from memory into S or T form in registers, and do the reverse
    > on store instructions.


    No, D is converted to/from G on store/load, but F and G operations
    are implemented.


  19. Re: Most impressive VAX installations


    "Glen Herrmannsfeldt" wrote in message
    news:get3qq$5n2$1@aioe.org...

    > As I understand it, F, D, and G on Alpha also involve conversion to S/T,
    > but the conversion is done in hardware. The load/store instructions load
    > F, D , or G from memory into S or T form in registers, and do the reverse
    > on store instructions.


    As Tim and Bob have already mentioned, the register format isn't any of the
    memory formats of F/D/G/S/T. The load/store instructions know how to swap
    bits around. The various instruction formats essentially control rounding,
    precision, etc. So I suppose you can say that Alpha only knows one
    floating format since all the operate instructions only work on registers.
    The register format is essentially T format.

    I64 is the same way. The I64 floating register is 82-bits wide. The
    various instruction forms and FPSR bits control the precision, rouding,
    shuffling of bits to/from memory, etc.

    John



  20. Re: Most impressive VAX installations

    John Reagan wrote:
    (I wrote)

    >>As I understand it, F, D, and G on Alpha also involve conversion to S/T,
    >>but the conversion is done in hardware. The load/store instructions load
    >>F, D , or G from memory into S or T form in registers, and do the reverse
    >>on store instructions.


    > As Tim and Bob have already mentioned, the register format isn't any of the
    > memory formats of F/D/G/S/T. The load/store instructions know how to swap
    > bits around. The various instruction formats essentially control rounding,
    > precision, etc. So I suppose you can say that Alpha only knows one
    > floating format since all the operate instructions only work on registers.
    > The register format is essentially T format.


    Tim and Bob don't seem to mention that the byte order
    is completely different. It seems strange to call them 'similar'
    or 'implemented' given the differences.

    -- glen


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