Re: VMS SIG discovers what Billy really relies on - VMS

This is a discussion on Re: VMS SIG discovers what Billy really relies on - VMS ; "Tim Wilkinson" wrote on 10/24/2008 11:02:46 AM: > > > > I'll never forget my first head-crash! It was an IBM 2311. For those to > > young to have ever seen one, it was a "washing machine" with a ...

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Thread: Re: VMS SIG discovers what Billy really relies on

  1. Re: VMS SIG discovers what Billy really relies on

    "Tim Wilkinson" wrote on 10/24/2008 11:02:46
    AM:

    > >
    > > I'll never forget my first head-crash! It was an IBM 2311. For those

    to
    > > young to have ever seen one, it was a "washing machine" with a top

    loading
    > > disk pack of 6-8 platters. I think it was a whole 7.5 megabytes!
    > >
    > > The console started logging errors and there was this high pitched
    > > screeching. . . .
    > >
    > > There was a story then current about an operator who tried to deal

    with a
    > > head crash by mounting the crashed pack on another drive. . . . ISTR

    that
    > > the total carnage was something like seven drives and seven disk packs


    > > destroyed!

    >
    > One of my operators managed to go through 5 cdc 400mb drives (Long time

    ago
    > so I might not be quite accurate with the make/size, but size of a

    washing
    > machine), connected to a pair of Computervision Cadds 4 systems. When

    he
    > tried to install/format a new disc pack
    >
    > When I conducted the inquest, you could see the lowest platter on the

    first
    > pack was bent by about 1/2". As if the pack had been dropped. It

    appeared he
    > put it in the first system and crashed it, his first crash and had not
    > realised, put it in the second drive and crashed that. Decided it must

    be
    > the system at fault and moved the damaged pack to the second system and
    > crash.
    >
    > So having decided it must be the pack. He then moved the two packs he

    had
    > installed into the first systems crashed drives into the second systems
    > remaining last two drives. I then get a phone call at home to tell me

    he
    > was having problems. err yes you have a problem.
    >
    > To be honest, he was installing 2 brand new packs. It had not occurred

    to
    > anyone when we wrote his instructions to visually check a pack for

    damage.
    > We attempted to recover the costs from the pack supplier who argued the
    > damage was as a result of installing the pack in a crashed drive etc.

    total
    > of 5 drives and about 9 disc packs after he had installed original
    > packs/backups and new in the crashed drives
    >
    > My company was not happy that we had about 30 cad operators idle for a

    few
    > days whilst the drives were rebuilt.


    I remember one fateful, fatal evening when two DEC (remember them) field
    service engineers were doing preventative maintenance on the RM05's and
    placed the alignment pack on the top of one while they worked on another.
    In due course, the "washing-machine effect" caused the alignment pack to
    topple off onto the floor, trashing a roughly $20K investment. One of
    them
    had to drive 30-odd miles away to get a backup from another office.
    Talk about embarrassing.

    >
    >
    > Now for another lesson from them systems. Each had 1/2" tape drives and

    we
    > had a problem reading tapes from 1 to the other, the technician decided

    the
    > problem was a result of an alignment/speed problem and reset the

    heads/motor
    > etc. We then discovered that we were now unable to read archives tapes

    of
    > our cad parts and the tech was unable to undo his realignment.
    >
    > Talking of alignment, when was the last time anyone used a floppy

    alignment
    > disc/scope?
    >
    >



  2. Re: VMS SIG discovers what Billy really relies on

    Imagine how the image would look with8 itanics in a rack with 3TB disk array
    It would look like a lame little server setup for a local elementary school
    The big vaxen and Ra series disks did and still do look very impressive
    I saw an array (SA482) on some Steven Segal movie the other day (with a
    limey Michael Caine as the bad guy)

    Come to think of it, why are the Bad Guys always English in American movies?
    I am English and I personally think I'm a really nice person.... nay,
    extremely nice...

    And if anyone wants to counter my belief then I'll find out where you live
    and...


    --
    David B Turner

    =============================================

    Island Computers US Corp
    PO Box 86
    Tybee GA 31328

    Toll Free: 1-877 636 4332 x201, Mobile x251
    Email: dturner@islandco.com
    International & Local: (001)- 404-806-7749
    Fax: 912 786 8505
    Web: www.islandco.com

    =============================================
    wrote in message
    news:OFFA63360E.C18526C9-ONC22574EC.00539355-852574EC.005391EB@metso.com...

    "Tim Wilkinson" wrote on 10/24/2008 11:02:46 AM:

    > >
    > > I'll never forget my first head-crash! It was an IBM 2311. For those
    > > to
    > > young to have ever seen one, it was a "washing machine" with a top
    > > loading
    > > disk pack of 6-8 platters. I think it was a whole 7.5 megabytes!
    > >
    > > The console started logging errors and there was this high pitched
    > > screeching. . . .
    > >
    > > There was a story then current about an operator who tried to deal with
    > > a
    > > head crash by mounting the crashed pack on another drive. . . ISTR that
    > > the total carnage was something like seven drives and seven disk packs
    > > destroyed!

    >
    > One of my operators managed to go through 5 cdc 400mb drives (Long time
    > ago
    > so I might not be quite accurate with the make/size, but size of a washing
    > machine), connected to a pair of Computervision Cadds 4 systems. When he
    > tried to install/format a new disc pack
    >
    > When I conducted the inquest, you could see the lowest platter on the
    > first
    > pack was bent by about 1/2". As if the pack had been dropped. It appeared
    > he
    > put it in the first system and crashed it, his first crash and had not
    > realised, put it in the second drive and crashed that. Decided it must be
    > the system at fault and moved the damaged pack to the second system and
    > crash.
    >
    > So having decided it must be the pack. He then moved the two packs he had
    > installed into the first systems crashed drives into the second systems
    > remaining last two drives. I then get a phone call at home to tell me he
    > was having problems. err yes you have a problem.
    >
    > To be honest, he was installing 2 brand new packs. It had not occurred to
    > anyone when we wrote his instructions to visually check a pack for damage.
    > We attempted to recover the costs from the pack supplier who argued the
    > damage was as a result of installing the pack in a crashed drive etc.
    > total
    > of 5 drives and about 9 disc packs after he had installed original
    > packs/backups and new in the crashed drives
    >
    > My company was not happy that we had about 30 cad operators idle for a few
    > days whilst the drives were rebuilt.


    I remember one fateful, fatal evening when two DEC (remember them) field
    service engineers were doing preventative maintenance on the RM05's and
    placed the alignment pack on the top of one while they worked on another.
    In due course, the "washing-machine effect" caused the alignment pack to
    topple off onto the floor, trashing a roughly $20K investment. One of them
    had to drive 30-odd miles away to get a backup from another office.
    Talk about embarrassing.

    >
    >
    > Now for another lesson from them systems. Each had 1/2" tape drives and we
    > had a problem reading tapes from 1 to the other, the technician decided
    > the
    > problem was a result of an alignment/speed problem and reset the
    > heads/motor
    > etc. We then discovered that we were now unable to read archives tapes of
    > our cad parts and the tech was unable to undo his realignment.
    >
    > Talking of alignment, when was the last time anyone used a floppy
    > alignment
    > disc/scope?
    >
    >



  3. Re: VMS SIG discovers what Billy really relies on

    In article <9smMk.54833$vX2.47090@bignews6.bellsouth.net>, "David Turner, islandco.com" writes:
    >Imagine how the image would look with8 itanics in a rack with 3TB disk array
    >It would look like a lame little server setup for a local elementary school
    >The big vaxen and Ra series disks did and still do look very impressive
    >I saw an array (SA482) on some Steven Segal movie the other day (with a
    >limey Michael Caine as the bad guy)
    >
    >Come to think of it, why are the Bad Guys always English in American movies?
    >I am English and I personally think I'm a really nice person.... nay,
    >extremely nice...


    Yeah, what's with that? All of my English friends are very nice; however,
    the English weren't portrayed as a particulary nice bunch in the film "The
    Patriot".

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    .... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    Copr. 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Publication of _this_ usenet article outside
    of usenet _must_ include its contents in its entirety including this copyright
    notice, disclaimer and quotations.

  4. Re: VMS SIG discovers what Billy really relies on

    David Turner, islandco.com wrote:

    > Come to think of it, why are the Bad Guys always English in American movies?
    > I am English and I personally think I'm a really nice person.... nay,
    > extremely nice...


    In "A fish called Wanda", I would say the bad guys are americans.
    (especially the character played by Kevin Klein).

    Ooops, that wasn't an american movie...

  5. Re: VMS SIG discovers what Billy really relies on

    In article <4902294f$0$12515$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com>, JF Mezei writes:
    >David Turner, islandco.com wrote:
    >
    >> Come to think of it, why are the Bad Guys always English in American movies?
    >> I am English and I personally think I'm a really nice person.... nay,
    >> extremely nice...

    >
    >In "A fish called Wanda", I would say the bad guys are americans.
    >(especially the character played by Kevin Klein).
    >
    >Ooops, that wasn't an american movie...


    John Cleese played the barrister (lawyer) and, English or American, lawyers
    are always bad people.

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    .... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    Copr. 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Publication of _this_ usenet article outside
    of usenet _must_ include its contents in its entirety including this copyright
    notice, disclaimer and quotations.

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