AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test - VMS

This is a discussion on AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test - VMS ; On 19 oct, 15:56, johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote: > My vague recollection is that the LCD is driven by the main processor, > there's no microcontroller or similar to drive the boot and diagnostic > process, though some of the more upmarket ...

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Thread: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

  1. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    On 19 oct, 15:56, johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    > My vague recollection is that the LCD is driven by the main processor,
    > there's no microcontroller or similar to drive the boot and diagnostic
    > process, though some of the more upmarket Alphaservers do have this.
    > Thus it's probably no great surprise that when the LCD doesn't do the
    > expected thing, nothing else works further on than that. When you get
    > something onscreen, what do you get? (I'd usually suggest using the
    > serial console, except you're not getting that far... maybe disable
    > the onboard VGA, *and* remove the PBXGA, as per User's Guide [1] Table
    > 9-7?)
    >
    > You did say "The memory appears to be recognized (when I can get that
    > far in the boot console)" - exactly what is leading you to think
    > that?
    >
    > The Users Guide Chapter 6, Memory section, says that memory must be
    > configured in groups of 5 SIMMs: "A minimum of one memory bank (five
    > modules) is required.". This confirms my recollection that this system
    > is intended to be used with ECC. Whether it will *work* (by any
    > sensible definition of work) without ECC is a slightly different
    > question, which others may be able to confirm if your Service Guide
    > doesn't shed any light (especially anyone with real life AlphaServer
    > 1000A experience).
    >
    > In your situation I'd be looking for a SIMM to match any one of the
    > existing ones, and reduce it to one bank of five identical SIMMs as
    > the next step, just to see what the system does when not semi-
    > permanently stuck in a tight loop handling uncorrectable memory errors
    > (which *might* be what it's doing at the moment).
    >
    > Don't forget that once you do get it live, you might want to check
    > your firmware is reasonably recent. You are also supposed to run the
    > relevant EISA config utility for VMS. This may be important even if
    > you are not using any EISA cards, unless you are 100% confident you
    > don't need any changes from the current EISA config; EISA config
    > values can in principle change with firmware changes and OS changes,
    > so it's good to be confident. Incorrect EISA config values can cause
    > Bad Things to happen at inconvenient times.
    >
    > Good luck
    > John


    Hi John,

    Will try to briefly respond. Not next to the machine right now, but
    the discussion about the SIMMs has come up again further along in the
    thread so I'll try to summarize.

    I received the machine in this condition with 3 quadruplets of SIMMs.
    Now the service guide mentions that the banks 0, 1, 2 and 3 each
    contain 4 SIMMs _plus_ an additional bank of 4 ECC SIMMs (1 for each
    'ordinary' bank). The bank 0 is listed as obligatory with the one ECC
    SIMM placed in a specific slot of the ECC bank in order to match it.
    (If you can see this in your head, you may note that something is not
    adding up already.)

    When I pulled all the memory and started from scratch, my first
    attempt was to fill what I thought to be the bank 0 and place what I
    presumed to be an ECC SIMM in the correct slot. When I turned the
    machine on and few times and it displayed the blue boot console, it
    complained that the bank 1 was filled and that the bank 0 was
    mismatched!

    I then looked more closely at the mother board and realized that there
    is _NO_ ECC bank, contrary to the service guide! Just banks 0 through
    3 for 'ordinary' RAM. Below the bank 0, however, one notices that
    there are solder points for an eventual ECC bank. Moreover, what I
    thought to be ECC SIMMs must therefore be 'ordinary' SIMMs although
    I'll compare the product codes this evening just to be 100% sure.

    (Just to assure you that I'm not crazy, this is supposed to be a 1000A
    and not a 1000.)

    So for troubleshooting I've placed these four non-ECC SIMMs in what is
    really the bank 0 and I turn on the machine. When it successfully
    starts and brings me to the boot console, it indicates the 256 MB of
    RAM is present and that the other banks are empty. The chevron prompt
    DOES appear. This however does NOT stop the screen from going black
    after one or two minutes and the machine becoming unresponsive.

    If the memory enigma is solved, I suppose the next step is to
    investigate the console vs serial option. This revision of the
    motherboard does not have a jumper for onboard VGA -- in fact there is
    no onboard VGA. Going back in time a bit -- when I received the
    machine, it lacked a video card and I had initially connected a null
    modem cable. It was already displaying the strange symptom of a blank
    Operator Control Pannel (the "OCP" LCD) most of the time, so it was
    not suprising that nothing showed up on the terminal (minicom on a
    Linux box connected via the null modem cable).

    (As part of my diagnostic process, I had picked up a cheap PBXGA-AA/
    AN, placed it in a PCI slot and connected it to a monitor. By chance,
    after a few power cycles, the OCP once displayed the self tests and
    there was output to the monitor (the blue SRM console) which
    eventually turned off course. This is when I began to investigate a
    possible problem with the memory.)

    FYI, an additional test that I performed was to pull everything --
    memory, SCSI, floppy, keyboard, expansion cards -- just to see if the
    OCP would activate in a more consistent fashion. This changed
    nothing. I also tried powering it on without the CPU daughter card
    and this did not help either (of course if the OCP is dependant on the
    CPU, this was to be expected).

    At this point, I'm beginning to think that there is some sort of
    serious hardware fault (e.g. defective power supply or crack in the
    board as opposed to a bad or mismatched SIMM). My hope is that (a)
    someone with a similar machine may have solved such a problem or (b)
    there may be a way to diagnose the faulty hardware before I send the
    machine to be recycled!

    - Alex

  2. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    On 20 Oct, 14:10, jacquesal wrote:
    > On 19 oct, 15:56, johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > My vague recollection is that the LCD is driven by the main processor,
    > > there's no microcontroller or similar to drive the boot and diagnostic
    > > process, though some of the more upmarket Alphaservers do have this.
    > > Thus it's probably no great surprise that when the LCD doesn't do the
    > > expected thing, nothing else works further on than that. When you get
    > > something onscreen, what do you get? (I'd usually suggest using the
    > > serial console, except you're not getting that far... maybe disable
    > > the onboard VGA, *and* remove the PBXGA, as per User's Guide [1] Table
    > > 9-7?)

    >
    > > You did say "The memory appears to be recognized (when I can get that
    > > far in the boot console)" - exactly what is leading you to think
    > > that?

    >
    > > The Users Guide Chapter 6, Memory section, says that memory must be
    > > configured in groups of 5 SIMMs: "A minimum of one memory bank (five
    > > modules) is required.". This confirms my recollection that this system
    > > is intended to be used with ECC. Whether it will *work* (by any
    > > sensible definition of work) without ECC is a slightly different
    > > question, which others may be able to confirm if your Service Guide
    > > doesn't shed any light (especially anyone with real life AlphaServer
    > > 1000A experience).

    >
    > > In your situation I'd be looking for a SIMM to match any one of the
    > > existing ones, and reduce it to one bank of five identical SIMMs as
    > > the next step, just to see what the system does when not semi-
    > > permanently stuck in a tight loop handling uncorrectable memory errors
    > > (which *might* be what it's doing at the moment).

    >
    > > Don't forget that once you do get it live, you might want to check
    > > your firmware is reasonably recent. You are also supposed to run the
    > > relevant EISA config utility for VMS. This may be important even if
    > > you are not using any EISA cards, unless you are 100% confident you
    > > don't need any changes from the current EISA config; EISA config
    > > values can in principle change with firmware changes and OS changes,
    > > so it's good to be confident. Incorrect EISA config values can cause
    > > Bad Things to happen at inconvenient times.

    >
    > > Good luck
    > > John

    >
    > Hi John,
    >
    > Will try to briefly respond. Not next to the machine right now, but
    > the discussion about the SIMMs has come up again further along in the
    > thread so I'll try to summarize.
    >
    > I received the machine in this condition with 3 quadruplets of SIMMs.
    > Now the service guide mentions that the banks 0, 1, 2 and 3 each
    > contain 4 SIMMs _plus_ an additional bank of 4 ECC SIMMs (1 for each
    > 'ordinary' bank). *The bank 0 is listed as obligatory with the one ECC
    > SIMM placed in a specific slot of the ECC bank in order to match it.
    > (If you can see this in your head, you may note that something is not
    > adding up already.)
    >
    > When I pulled all the memory and started from scratch, my first
    > attempt was to fill what I thought to be the bank 0 and place what I
    > presumed to be an ECC SIMM in the correct slot. *When I turned the
    > machine on and few times and it displayed the blue boot console, it
    > complained that the bank 1 was filled and that the bank 0 was
    > mismatched!
    >
    > I then looked more closely at the mother board and realized that there
    > is _NO_ ECC bank, contrary to the service guide! *Just banks 0 through
    > 3 for 'ordinary' RAM. Below the bank 0, however, one notices that
    > there are solder points for an eventual ECC bank. *Moreover, what I
    > thought to be ECC SIMMs must therefore be 'ordinary' SIMMs although
    > I'll compare the product codes this evening just to be 100% sure.
    >
    > (Just to assure you that I'm not crazy, this is supposed to be a 1000A
    > and not a 1000.)
    >
    > So for troubleshooting I've placed these four non-ECC SIMMs in what is
    > really the bank 0 and I turn on the machine. *When it successfully
    > starts and brings me to the boot console, it indicates the 256 MB of
    > RAM is present and that the other banks are empty. *The chevron prompt
    > DOES appear. *This however does NOT stop the screen from going black
    > after one or two minutes and the machine becoming unresponsive.
    >
    > If the memory enigma is solved, I suppose the next step is to
    > investigate the console vs serial option. *This revision of the
    > motherboard does not have a jumper for onboard VGA -- in fact there is
    > no onboard VGA. *Going back in time a bit -- when I received the
    > machine, it lacked a video card and I had initially connected a null
    > modem cable. *It was already displaying the strange symptom of a blank
    > Operator Control Pannel (the "OCP" LCD) most of the time, so it was
    > not suprising that nothing showed up on the terminal (minicom on a
    > Linux box connected via the null modem cable).
    >
    > (As part of my diagnostic process, I had picked up a cheap PBXGA-AA/
    > AN, placed it in a PCI slot and connected it to a monitor. By chance,
    > after a few power cycles, the OCP once displayed the self tests and
    > there was output to the monitor (the blue SRM console) which
    > eventually turned off course. This is when I began to investigate a
    > possible problem with the memory.)
    >
    > FYI, an additional test that I performed was to pull everything --
    > memory, SCSI, floppy, keyboard, expansion cards -- just to see if the
    > OCP would activate in a more consistent fashion. This changed
    > nothing. *I also tried powering it on without the CPU daughter card
    > and this did not help either (of course if the OCP is dependant on the
    > CPU, this was to be expected).
    >
    > At this point, I'm beginning to think that there is some sort of
    > serious hardware fault (e.g. defective power supply or crack in the
    > board as opposed to a bad or mismatched SIMM). My hope is that (a)
    > someone with a similar machine may have solved such a problem or (b)
    > there may be a way to diagnose the faulty hardware before I send the
    > machine to be recycled!
    >
    > - Alex- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Is it a rackmount or a pedestal system? IRC, the rackmount doesn't
    have the 5th slot whereas the pedestal does. The pedestal servers
    have an integral storageworks shelf with seven slots in it. The rack
    mount version doesn't.

    If the system doesn't give an accurate pip code when there's no memory
    and no option cards in, I'd bet at it being either main logic board
    related or PSU related. If it's a pedestal box, the PSU is relatively
    easy to swap. For a rackmount, it's more difficult (but probably
    still straightforward enough if you trace all of the cabling).

    FWIW, I think most of the documentation I've seen refers to the
    pedestal version, _not_ the rackmount.
    Steve

  3. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    On Oct 20, 2:10 pm, jacquesal
    wrote:
    > On 19 oct, 15:56, johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > My vague recollection is that the LCD is driven by the main processor,
    > > there's no microcontroller or similar to drive the boot and diagnostic
    > > process, though some of the more upmarket Alphaservers do have this.
    > > Thus it's probably no great surprise that when the LCD doesn't do the
    > > expected thing, nothing else works further on than that. When you get
    > > something onscreen, what do you get? (I'd usually suggest using the
    > > serial console, except you're not getting that far... maybe disable
    > > the onboard VGA, *and* remove the PBXGA, as per User's Guide [1] Table
    > > 9-7?)

    >
    > > You did say "The memory appears to be recognized (when I can get that
    > > far in the boot console)" - exactly what is leading you to think
    > > that?

    >
    > > The Users Guide Chapter 6, Memory section, says that memory must be
    > > configured in groups of 5 SIMMs: "A minimum of one memory bank (five
    > > modules) is required.". This confirms my recollection that this system
    > > is intended to be used with ECC. Whether it will *work* (by any
    > > sensible definition of work) without ECC is a slightly different
    > > question, which others may be able to confirm if your Service Guide
    > > doesn't shed any light (especially anyone with real life AlphaServer
    > > 1000A experience).

    >
    > > In your situation I'd be looking for a SIMM to match any one of the
    > > existing ones, and reduce it to one bank of five identical SIMMs as
    > > the next step, just to see what the system does when not semi-
    > > permanently stuck in a tight loop handling uncorrectable memory errors
    > > (which *might* be what it's doing at the moment).

    >
    > > Don't forget that once you do get it live, you might want to check
    > > your firmware is reasonably recent. You are also supposed to run the
    > > relevant EISA config utility for VMS. This may be important even if
    > > you are not using any EISA cards, unless you are 100% confident you
    > > don't need any changes from the current EISA config; EISA config
    > > values can in principle change with firmware changes and OS changes,
    > > so it's good to be confident. Incorrect EISA config values can cause
    > > Bad Things to happen at inconvenient times.

    >
    > > Good luck
    > > John

    >
    > Hi John,
    >
    > Will try to briefly respond. Not next to the machine right now, but
    > the discussion about the SIMMs has come up again further along in the
    > thread so I'll try to summarize.
    >
    > I received the machine in this condition with 3 quadruplets of SIMMs.
    > Now the service guide mentions that the banks 0, 1, 2 and 3 each
    > contain 4 SIMMs _plus_ an additional bank of 4 ECC SIMMs (1 for each
    > 'ordinary' bank). The bank 0 is listed as obligatory with the one ECC
    > SIMM placed in a specific slot of the ECC bank in order to match it.
    > (If you can see this in your head, you may note that something is not
    > adding up already.)
    >
    > When I pulled all the memory and started from scratch, my first
    > attempt was to fill what I thought to be the bank 0 and place what I
    > presumed to be an ECC SIMM in the correct slot. When I turned the
    > machine on and few times and it displayed the blue boot console, it
    > complained that the bank 1 was filled and that the bank 0 was
    > mismatched!
    >
    > I then looked more closely at the mother board and realized that there
    > is _NO_ ECC bank, contrary to the service guide! Just banks 0 through
    > 3 for 'ordinary' RAM. Below the bank 0, however, one notices that
    > there are solder points for an eventual ECC bank. Moreover, what I
    > thought to be ECC SIMMs must therefore be 'ordinary' SIMMs although
    > I'll compare the product codes this evening just to be 100% sure.
    >
    > (Just to assure you that I'm not crazy, this is supposed to be a 1000A
    > and not a 1000.)
    >
    > So for troubleshooting I've placed these four non-ECC SIMMs in what is
    > really the bank 0 and I turn on the machine. When it successfully
    > starts and brings me to the boot console, it indicates the 256 MB of
    > RAM is present and that the other banks are empty. The chevron prompt
    > DOES appear. This however does NOT stop the screen from going black
    > after one or two minutes and the machine becoming unresponsive.
    >
    > If the memory enigma is solved, I suppose the next step is to
    > investigate the console vs serial option. This revision of the
    > motherboard does not have a jumper for onboard VGA -- in fact there is
    > no onboard VGA. Going back in time a bit -- when I received the
    > machine, it lacked a video card and I had initially connected a null
    > modem cable. It was already displaying the strange symptom of a blank
    > Operator Control Pannel (the "OCP" LCD) most of the time, so it was
    > not suprising that nothing showed up on the terminal (minicom on a
    > Linux box connected via the null modem cable).
    >
    > (As part of my diagnostic process, I had picked up a cheap PBXGA-AA/
    > AN, placed it in a PCI slot and connected it to a monitor. By chance,
    > after a few power cycles, the OCP once displayed the self tests and
    > there was output to the monitor (the blue SRM console) which
    > eventually turned off course. This is when I began to investigate a
    > possible problem with the memory.)
    >
    > FYI, an additional test that I performed was to pull everything --
    > memory, SCSI, floppy, keyboard, expansion cards -- just to see if the
    > OCP would activate in a more consistent fashion. This changed
    > nothing. I also tried powering it on without the CPU daughter card
    > and this did not help either (of course if the OCP is dependant on the
    > CPU, this was to be expected).
    >
    > At this point, I'm beginning to think that there is some sort of
    > serious hardware fault (e.g. defective power supply or crack in the
    > board as opposed to a bad or mismatched SIMM). My hope is that (a)
    > someone with a similar machine may have solved such a problem or (b)
    > there may be a way to diagnose the faulty hardware before I send the
    > machine to be recycled!
    >
    > - Alex



    Ooooerrr. It suddenly occurs to me that AlphaServer 1000A existed in
    both EV4/21064 and EV5/21164 flavours, and the manual I referred to
    appears to predate the EV5 ones. Sounds a lot like your service manual
    might too. Might be good to confirm this before proceeding much
    further.

    Do you know much about the history of this box, eg when/where did it
    last work and who did what to break it ?

    More realistically, does it have a part number on an external label
    somewhere? That may not be definitive, as it could have been field
    upgraded from EV4 to EV5.

    On the main logic board, is there anything resembling a part number or
    codename? Alternatively: Not too far from the CPU there should be a
    few reasonably big "glue logic" chips; if their numbers resemble 2107x
    it's an EV4, if they say 2117x then it's EV5. (You won't easily be
    able to see the part number on the CPU itself ) That will at least
    help identify which manuals are relevant and which aren't. There are
    other ways of telling whether it's EV4 or EV5 too; if you have a
    preferred alternative, try it.

    The SIMMs you are using, are they true 36bit SIMMs (not 32bit plus
    fake parity)? I'm thinking you'll need true 36bit now that we think
    that there is no separate ECC bank.

  4. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    johnwallace4@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    > On Oct 20, 11:16 am, etmsr...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    >> On 20 Oct, 08:14, johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> On Oct 20, 1:16 am, JF Mezei wrote:
    >>>> VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG wrote:
    >>>>> It's been quite a while since I touched a 1000 but I believe that pulling
    >>>>> the kbd and mouse would make it default to serial console.
    >>>> And wouldn't the graphical display go blank during serial console bootup
    >>>> until decwindows was started and started sending billions and billions
    >>>> of colour pixels to it ?
    >>> My recollection is that the VGA BIOS on the graphics card is executed
    >>> fairly early on in the powerup sequence, before the usual text output
    >>> from the console code, and maybe even before keyboard and mouse are
    >>> probed. On my PBXGA (aka ZLXp? aka???) the VGA BIOS does a small set
    >>> of tests which draw basic colour bars and the like. So although I
    >>> think VAXman's right re defaulting to serial console if kbd and mouse
    >>> are missing, I also think there's still some limited dependency on the
    >>> PBXGA during early powerup, so for safety it may be best to eliminate
    >>> it from the picture at least temporarily.

    >> The AlphaServer 1000A that I have will turn the screen blue "a while"
    >> after the system is powered up and will then send two character
    >> diagnostic codes to the screen as it tests parts of the system.

    >
    > Indeed. Typical Alpha behaviour for boxes of that class from that era.
    > Somewhere there should be magic decoder rings to get from codes to
    > tests (and thus to problems),


    The "magic decoder ring" was disguised as an "Owner's Manual" or "User's
    Guide"! It was stored in some instantly forgettable location or used to
    shim up a desk and will be found N years after the hardware is scrapped!

  5. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    On 20 Oct, 16:53, "Richard B. Gilbert" wrote:
    > johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    > > On Oct 20, 11:16 am, etmsr...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    > >> On 20 Oct, 08:14, johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

    >
    > >>> On Oct 20, 1:16 am, JF Mezei wrote:
    > >>>> VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG wrote:
    > >>>>> It's been quite a while since I touched a 1000 but I believe that pulling
    > >>>>> the kbd and mouse would make it default to serial console.
    > >>>> And wouldn't the graphical display go blank during serial console bootup
    > >>>> until decwindows was started and started sending billions and billions
    > >>>> of colour pixels to it ?
    > >>> My recollection is that the VGA BIOS on the graphics card is executed
    > >>> fairly early on in the powerup sequence, before the usual text output
    > >>> from the console code, and maybe even before keyboard and mouse are
    > >>> probed. On my PBXGA (aka ZLXp? aka???) the VGA BIOS does a small set
    > >>> of tests which draw basic colour bars and the like. So although I
    > >>> think VAXman's right re defaulting to serial console if kbd and mouse
    > >>> are missing, I also think there's still some limited dependency on the
    > >>> PBXGA during early powerup, so for safety it may be best to eliminate
    > >>> it from the picture at least temporarily.
    > >> The AlphaServer 1000A that I have will turn the screen blue "a while"
    > >> after the system is powered up and will then send two character
    > >> diagnostic codes to the screen as it tests parts of the system.

    >
    > > Indeed. Typical Alpha behaviour for boxes of that class from that era.
    > > Somewhere there should be magic decoder rings to get from codes to
    > > tests (and thus to problems),

    >
    > The "magic decoder ring" was disguised as an "Owner's Manual" or "User's
    > Guide"! *It was stored in some instantly forgettable location or used to
    > shim up a desk and will be found N years after the hardware is scrapped!-Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    That would be at http://h18002.www1.hp.com/alphaserve...000a_tech.html

    Steve

  6. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    Try

    >>>set console graphics
    >>>init



    Also use a Card such as the S3Trio64 - which synchs to 60Hz by default
    Looks to me like the card you have goes out of synch.


    --
    David B Turner

    =============================================

    Island Computers US Corp
    PO Box 86
    Tybee GA 31328

    Toll Free: 1-877 636 4332 x201, Mobile x251
    Email: dturner@islandco.com
    International & Local: (001)- 404-806-7749
    Fax: 912 786 8505
    Web: www.islandco.com

    =============================================
    wrote in message
    news:93837673-9337-48a1-a868-08ddedcff7a5@64g2000hsm.googlegroups.com...
    > Hello all,
    >
    > I'm trying to do an installation on an old AlphaServer 1000a with
    > video card installed.
    >
    > When I turn it on, one can clearly see that the system performs its
    > self tests thanks to the LCD on the front panel.
    >
    > Some moments later, the blue screen appears on the monitor and I see
    > that the remaining tests -- including memory -- are completed
    > successful. The ">>>" prompt appears.
    >
    > Then, about 1 min later, the screen goes dark.
    >
    > Any ideas?




  7. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    On Oct 20, 5:03 pm, etmsr...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    > On 20 Oct, 16:53, "Richard B. Gilbert" wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    > > > On Oct 20, 11:16 am, etmsr...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    > > >> On 20 Oct, 08:14, johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

    >
    > > >>> On Oct 20, 1:16 am, JF Mezei wrote:
    > > >>>> VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG wrote:
    > > >>>>> It's been quite a while since I touched a 1000 but I believe that pulling
    > > >>>>> the kbd and mouse would make it default to serial console.
    > > >>>> And wouldn't the graphical display go blank during serial console bootup
    > > >>>> until decwindows was started and started sending billions and billions
    > > >>>> of colour pixels to it ?
    > > >>> My recollection is that the VGA BIOS on the graphics card is executed
    > > >>> fairly early on in the powerup sequence, before the usual text output
    > > >>> from the console code, and maybe even before keyboard and mouse are
    > > >>> probed. On my PBXGA (aka ZLXp? aka???) the VGA BIOS does a small set
    > > >>> of tests which draw basic colour bars and the like. So although I
    > > >>> think VAXman's right re defaulting to serial console if kbd and mouse
    > > >>> are missing, I also think there's still some limited dependency on the
    > > >>> PBXGA during early powerup, so for safety it may be best to eliminate
    > > >>> it from the picture at least temporarily.
    > > >> The AlphaServer 1000A that I have will turn the screen blue "a while"
    > > >> after the system is powered up and will then send two character
    > > >> diagnostic codes to the screen as it tests parts of the system.

    >
    > > > Indeed. Typical Alpha behaviour for boxes of that class from that era.
    > > > Somewhere there should be magic decoder rings to get from codes to
    > > > tests (and thus to problems),

    >
    > > The "magic decoder ring" was disguised as an "Owner's Manual" or "User's
    > > Guide"! It was stored in some instantly forgettable location or used to
    > > shim up a desk and will be found N years after the hardware is scrapped!- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > > - Show quoted text -

    >
    > That would be athttp://h18002.www1.hp.com/alphaserver/archive/1000a/1000a_tech.html
    >
    > Steve


    The Owner's Guide on that page is useful if you've got an EV4/21064
    AlphaServer 1000A, whereas imo it now looks like we may have the
    EV5/21164 here. Maybe the test codes are the same... ????

    On the same page is a set of links to Systems and Options catalogue
    chapters which *might* allow the part number on the server to be
    correlated to the system config as shipped (which may or may not help
    confirm whether it's EV5 or not).

  8. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    On Oct 20, 2:10 pm, jacquesal
    wrote:
    > On 19 oct, 15:56, johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > My vague recollection is that the LCD is driven by the main processor,
    > > there's no microcontroller or similar to drive the boot and diagnostic
    > > process, though some of the more upmarket Alphaservers do have this.
    > > Thus it's probably no great surprise that when the LCD doesn't do the
    > > expected thing, nothing else works further on than that. When you get
    > > something onscreen, what do you get? (I'd usually suggest using the
    > > serial console, except you're not getting that far... maybe disable
    > > the onboard VGA, *and* remove the PBXGA, as per User's Guide [1] Table
    > > 9-7?)

    >
    > > You did say "The memory appears to be recognized (when I can get that
    > > far in the boot console)" - exactly what is leading you to think
    > > that?

    >
    > > The Users Guide Chapter 6, Memory section, says that memory must be
    > > configured in groups of 5 SIMMs: "A minimum of one memory bank (five
    > > modules) is required.". This confirms my recollection that this system
    > > is intended to be used with ECC. Whether it will *work* (by any
    > > sensible definition of work) without ECC is a slightly different
    > > question, which others may be able to confirm if your Service Guide
    > > doesn't shed any light (especially anyone with real life AlphaServer
    > > 1000A experience).

    >
    > > In your situation I'd be looking for a SIMM to match any one of the
    > > existing ones, and reduce it to one bank of five identical SIMMs as
    > > the next step, just to see what the system does when not semi-
    > > permanently stuck in a tight loop handling uncorrectable memory errors
    > > (which *might* be what it's doing at the moment).

    >
    > > Don't forget that once you do get it live, you might want to check
    > > your firmware is reasonably recent. You are also supposed to run the
    > > relevant EISA config utility for VMS. This may be important even if
    > > you are not using any EISA cards, unless you are 100% confident you
    > > don't need any changes from the current EISA config; EISA config
    > > values can in principle change with firmware changes and OS changes,
    > > so it's good to be confident. Incorrect EISA config values can cause
    > > Bad Things to happen at inconvenient times.

    >
    > > Good luck
    > > John

    >
    > Hi John,
    >
    > Will try to briefly respond. Not next to the machine right now, but
    > the discussion about the SIMMs has come up again further along in the
    > thread so I'll try to summarize.
    >
    > I received the machine in this condition with 3 quadruplets of SIMMs.
    > Now the service guide mentions that the banks 0, 1, 2 and 3 each
    > contain 4 SIMMs _plus_ an additional bank of 4 ECC SIMMs (1 for each
    > 'ordinary' bank). The bank 0 is listed as obligatory with the one ECC
    > SIMM placed in a specific slot of the ECC bank in order to match it.
    > (If you can see this in your head, you may note that something is not
    > adding up already.)
    >
    > When I pulled all the memory and started from scratch, my first
    > attempt was to fill what I thought to be the bank 0 and place what I
    > presumed to be an ECC SIMM in the correct slot. When I turned the
    > machine on and few times and it displayed the blue boot console, it
    > complained that the bank 1 was filled and that the bank 0 was
    > mismatched!
    >
    > I then looked more closely at the mother board and realized that there
    > is _NO_ ECC bank, contrary to the service guide! Just banks 0 through
    > 3 for 'ordinary' RAM. Below the bank 0, however, one notices that
    > there are solder points for an eventual ECC bank. Moreover, what I
    > thought to be ECC SIMMs must therefore be 'ordinary' SIMMs although
    > I'll compare the product codes this evening just to be 100% sure.
    >
    > (Just to assure you that I'm not crazy, this is supposed to be a 1000A
    > and not a 1000.)
    >
    > So for troubleshooting I've placed these four non-ECC SIMMs in what is
    > really the bank 0 and I turn on the machine. When it successfully
    > starts and brings me to the boot console, it indicates the 256 MB of
    > RAM is present and that the other banks are empty. The chevron prompt
    > DOES appear. This however does NOT stop the screen from going black
    > after one or two minutes and the machine becoming unresponsive.
    >
    > If the memory enigma is solved, I suppose the next step is to
    > investigate the console vs serial option. This revision of the
    > motherboard does not have a jumper for onboard VGA -- in fact there is
    > no onboard VGA. Going back in time a bit -- when I received the
    > machine, it lacked a video card and I had initially connected a null
    > modem cable. It was already displaying the strange symptom of a blank
    > Operator Control Pannel (the "OCP" LCD) most of the time, so it was
    > not suprising that nothing showed up on the terminal (minicom on a
    > Linux box connected via the null modem cable).
    >
    > (As part of my diagnostic process, I had picked up a cheap PBXGA-AA/
    > AN, placed it in a PCI slot and connected it to a monitor. By chance,
    > after a few power cycles, the OCP once displayed the self tests and
    > there was output to the monitor (the blue SRM console) which
    > eventually turned off course. This is when I began to investigate a
    > possible problem with the memory.)
    >
    > FYI, an additional test that I performed was to pull everything --
    > memory, SCSI, floppy, keyboard, expansion cards -- just to see if the
    > OCP would activate in a more consistent fashion. This changed
    > nothing. I also tried powering it on without the CPU daughter card
    > and this did not help either (of course if the OCP is dependant on the
    > CPU, this was to be expected).
    >
    > At this point, I'm beginning to think that there is some sort of
    > serious hardware fault (e.g. defective power supply or crack in the
    > board as opposed to a bad or mismatched SIMM). My hope is that (a)
    > someone with a similar machine may have solved such a problem or (b)
    > there may be a way to diagnose the faulty hardware before I send the
    > machine to be recycled!
    >
    > - Alex


    Forgot this earlier - "there is no onboard VGA" is another difference
    between the EV4/21064 AlphaServer 1000A and the EV5/21164 AlphaServer
    1000A, according to the Systems+Options ordering info for the later
    AlphaServer 1000As.

    So, we very likely have an EV5/21164 AlphaServer 1000A, but the only
    docs we have found so far relate only to the EV4 AlphaServer 1000A,
    unless anyone has seen docs for the EV5 flavour?

    I'm going to make an off the wall suggestion - take a look at the
    AlphaStation 600 docs instead; try http://h18002.www1.hp.com/alphaserve...ired/a600.html
    for starters. You will see that there were two flavours of
    AlphaStation 600 too. Do either of them look like your box, eg do
    either of the slot configurations match? The more likely match of the
    two, since you've already mentioned a "CPU daughtercard", is the 600A.

    Table 4-3 in the AlphaStation 600A Users Guide describes the beep
    codes. One beep on its own is said to correspond to "successful system
    startup", which matches what you see. There is no description for "no
    beeps".

    Both the AlphaStation 600s had a PCI bridge. These allowed more PCI
    slots to be used but it could also make choice of slot important.
    Primary slots (on the "near" side of the PCI bridge) tended to be
    preferred, as not everything worked right on the far side of a PCI
    bridge, especially with early firmware versions. You want your PBXGA
    to be in a primary slot, probably your SCSI adapter and eventually
    maybe the network card too.

    The reason I'm suggesting this is that I have a(nother) vague
    recollection that there was a similar (same?) motherboard between the
    EV5 AlphaServer 1000s and one of the AlphaStation 600s. Even if it's
    not identical, the AlphaServer 600 internals are likely going to be
    more relevant to you than the AlphaServer 1000 EV4 internals.

    I still can't work out quite why you'd get as far as the three
    chevrons occasionally and then after a while the monitor goes blank
    and the machine goes unresponsive. Are all the fans spinning properly
    every time you power up (some of these systems had fan failure
    detection which may not have caused an instant shutdown, in fact I
    can't remember how they would respond to fan failure, but...)?

    On the occasions when the system does come up OK are all the power on
    self test diagnostics successful?

    Other thoughts: You may want to check the resolution/refresh settings
    on the PBXGA switches definitely match something your monitor can do
    (some monitors are strange). You may want to make sure your monitor
    isn't going to be upset by "sync on green" - there is a console
    variable to configure this once you are up and running. Becomes
    irrelevant (temporarily?) if you're using the serial console.

    You may also want to make sure the Halt switch is out (if you have
    one).

    And 36bit SIMMs are important.

    Good luck.

  9. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    On Oct 20, 9:29 pm, johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
    > On Oct 20, 2:10 pm, jacquesal
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On 19 oct, 15:56, johnwalla...@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

    >
    > > > My vague recollection is that the LCD is driven by the main processor,
    > > > there's no microcontroller or similar to drive the boot and diagnostic
    > > > process, though some of the more upmarket Alphaservers do have this.
    > > > Thus it's probably no great surprise that when the LCD doesn't do the
    > > > expected thing, nothing else works further on than that. When you get
    > > > something onscreen, what do you get? (I'd usually suggest using the
    > > > serial console, except you're not getting that far... maybe disable
    > > > the onboard VGA, *and* remove the PBXGA, as per User's Guide [1] Table
    > > > 9-7?)

    >
    > > > You did say "The memory appears to be recognized (when I can get that
    > > > far in the boot console)" - exactly what is leading you to think
    > > > that?

    >
    > > > The Users Guide Chapter 6, Memory section, says that memory must be
    > > > configured in groups of 5 SIMMs: "A minimum of one memory bank (five
    > > > modules) is required.". This confirms my recollection that this system
    > > > is intended to be used with ECC. Whether it will *work* (by any
    > > > sensible definition of work) without ECC is a slightly different
    > > > question, which others may be able to confirm if your Service Guide
    > > > doesn't shed any light (especially anyone with real life AlphaServer
    > > > 1000A experience).

    >
    > > > In your situation I'd be looking for a SIMM to match any one of the
    > > > existing ones, and reduce it to one bank of five identical SIMMs as
    > > > the next step, just to see what the system does when not semi-
    > > > permanently stuck in a tight loop handling uncorrectable memory errors
    > > > (which *might* be what it's doing at the moment).

    >
    > > > Don't forget that once you do get it live, you might want to check
    > > > your firmware is reasonably recent. You are also supposed to run the
    > > > relevant EISA config utility for VMS. This may be important even if
    > > > you are not using any EISA cards, unless you are 100% confident you
    > > > don't need any changes from the current EISA config; EISA config
    > > > values can in principle change with firmware changes and OS changes,
    > > > so it's good to be confident. Incorrect EISA config values can cause
    > > > Bad Things to happen at inconvenient times.

    >
    > > > Good luck
    > > > John

    >
    > > Hi John,

    >
    > > Will try to briefly respond. Not next to the machine right now, but
    > > the discussion about the SIMMs has come up again further along in the
    > > thread so I'll try to summarize.

    >
    > > I received the machine in this condition with 3 quadruplets of SIMMs.
    > > Now the service guide mentions that the banks 0, 1, 2 and 3 each
    > > contain 4 SIMMs _plus_ an additional bank of 4 ECC SIMMs (1 for each
    > > 'ordinary' bank). The bank 0 is listed as obligatory with the one ECC
    > > SIMM placed in a specific slot of the ECC bank in order to match it.
    > > (If you can see this in your head, you may note that something is not
    > > adding up already.)

    >
    > > When I pulled all the memory and started from scratch, my first
    > > attempt was to fill what I thought to be the bank 0 and place what I
    > > presumed to be an ECC SIMM in the correct slot. When I turned the
    > > machine on and few times and it displayed the blue boot console, it
    > > complained that the bank 1 was filled and that the bank 0 was
    > > mismatched!

    >
    > > I then looked more closely at the mother board and realized that there
    > > is _NO_ ECC bank, contrary to the service guide! Just banks 0 through
    > > 3 for 'ordinary' RAM. Below the bank 0, however, one notices that
    > > there are solder points for an eventual ECC bank. Moreover, what I
    > > thought to be ECC SIMMs must therefore be 'ordinary' SIMMs although
    > > I'll compare the product codes this evening just to be 100% sure.

    >
    > > (Just to assure you that I'm not crazy, this is supposed to be a 1000A
    > > and not a 1000.)

    >
    > > So for troubleshooting I've placed these four non-ECC SIMMs in what is
    > > really the bank 0 and I turn on the machine. When it successfully
    > > starts and brings me to the boot console, it indicates the 256 MB of
    > > RAM is present and that the other banks are empty. The chevron prompt
    > > DOES appear. This however does NOT stop the screen from going black
    > > after one or two minutes and the machine becoming unresponsive.

    >
    > > If the memory enigma is solved, I suppose the next step is to
    > > investigate the console vs serial option. This revision of the
    > > motherboard does not have a jumper for onboard VGA -- in fact there is
    > > no onboard VGA. Going back in time a bit -- when I received the
    > > machine, it lacked a video card and I had initially connected a null
    > > modem cable. It was already displaying the strange symptom of a blank
    > > Operator Control Pannel (the "OCP" LCD) most of the time, so it was
    > > not suprising that nothing showed up on the terminal (minicom on a
    > > Linux box connected via the null modem cable).

    >
    > > (As part of my diagnostic process, I had picked up a cheap PBXGA-AA/
    > > AN, placed it in a PCI slot and connected it to a monitor. By chance,
    > > after a few power cycles, the OCP once displayed the self tests and
    > > there was output to the monitor (the blue SRM console) which
    > > eventually turned off course. This is when I began to investigate a
    > > possible problem with the memory.)

    >
    > > FYI, an additional test that I performed was to pull everything --
    > > memory, SCSI, floppy, keyboard, expansion cards -- just to see if the
    > > OCP would activate in a more consistent fashion. This changed
    > > nothing. I also tried powering it on without the CPU daughter card
    > > and this did not help either (of course if the OCP is dependant on the
    > > CPU, this was to be expected).

    >
    > > At this point, I'm beginning to think that there is some sort of
    > > serious hardware fault (e.g. defective power supply or crack in the
    > > board as opposed to a bad or mismatched SIMM). My hope is that (a)
    > > someone with a similar machine may have solved such a problem or (b)
    > > there may be a way to diagnose the faulty hardware before I send the
    > > machine to be recycled!

    >
    > > - Alex

    >
    > Forgot this earlier - "there is no onboard VGA" is another difference
    > between the EV4/21064 AlphaServer 1000A and the EV5/21164 AlphaServer
    > 1000A, according to the Systems+Options ordering info for the later
    > AlphaServer 1000As.
    >
    > So, we very likely have an EV5/21164 AlphaServer 1000A, but the only
    > docs we have found so far relate only to the EV4 AlphaServer 1000A,
    > unless anyone has seen docs for the EV5 flavour?
    >
    > I'm going to make an off the wall suggestion - take a look at the
    > AlphaStation 600 docs instead; tryhttp://h18002.www1.hp.com/alphaserver/workstations/retired/a600.html
    > for starters. You will see that there were two flavours of
    > AlphaStation 600 too. Do either of them look like your box, eg do
    > either of the slot configurations match? The more likely match of the
    > two, since you've already mentioned a "CPU daughtercard", is the 600A.
    >
    > Table 4-3 in the AlphaStation 600A Users Guide describes the beep
    > codes. One beep on its own is said to correspond to "successful system
    > startup", which matches what you see. There is no description for "no
    > beeps".
    >
    > Both the AlphaStation 600s had a PCI bridge. These allowed more PCI
    > slots to be used but it could also make choice of slot important.
    > Primary slots (on the "near" side of the PCI bridge) tended to be
    > preferred, as not everything worked right on the far side of a PCI
    > bridge, especially with early firmware versions. You want your PBXGA
    > to be in a primary slot, probably your SCSI adapter and eventually
    > maybe the network card too.
    >
    > The reason I'm suggesting this is that I have a(nother) vague
    > recollection that there was a similar (same?) motherboard between the
    > EV5 AlphaServer 1000s and one of the AlphaStation 600s. Even if it's
    > not identical, the AlphaServer 600 internals are likely going to be
    > more relevant to you than the AlphaServer 1000 EV4 internals.
    >
    > I still can't work out quite why you'd get as far as the three
    > chevrons occasionally and then after a while the monitor goes blank
    > and the machine goes unresponsive. Are all the fans spinning properly
    > every time you power up (some of these systems had fan failure
    > detection which may not have caused an instant shutdown, in fact I
    > can't remember how they would respond to fan failure, but...)?
    >
    > On the occasions when the system does come up OK are all the power on
    > self test diagnostics successful?
    >
    > Other thoughts: You may want to check the resolution/refresh settings
    > on the PBXGA switches definitely match something your monitor can do
    > (some monitors are strange). You may want to make sure your monitor
    > isn't going to be upset by "sync on green" - there is a console
    > variable to configure this once you are up and running. Becomes
    > irrelevant (temporarily?) if you're using the serial console.
    >
    > You may also want to make sure the Halt switch is out (if you have
    > one).
    >
    > And 36bit SIMMs are important.
    >
    > Good luck.


    And something else I forgot: the 600A manual, table 7-10, describes
    jumper settings including those used to enable and disable system
    shutdown on overtemperature and fan failure. For now, I'd want them
    set to disable the usual fan failure and overtemperature shutdown.

  10. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    jacquesal wrote:

    > RAM is present and that the other banks are empty. The chevron prompt
    > DOES appear. This however does NOT stop the screen from going black
    > after one or two minutes and the machine becoming unresponsive.



    You might wish to time precicely the time between chevron appearing (or
    power on) and the time the screen goes blank. If it is some constant
    precise value like 1:30 seconds every time, it could mean some internal
    timer deciding something is wrong. If it is a variable amount of time
    and the machine lasts longer if it has been left powered off and cool
    for a while then it might be something about heat.

    For instance, perhaps the CPU is overheating and there is an automatic
    shut off ? (is the CPU fan OK, is it full of lint inside ?


  11. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    Oh, another thing:
    I forget the magic intantation, but most of DEC's consoles had some
    commands to do extensive tests of various hardware in the box.

    Perhaps, as soon as you get the chevron, you could issue such a command
    and see how it progresses before total failure.

    Also, I am not familiar with this particular box, but there should be a
    command that shows CPU temperature. (I think SHOW POWER but not sure).
    You could issue the command repeatedly to see if the CPU temperature
    rises fast without stabilising.

    On DS10Ls, by default, the machines will shutdown if CPU reaches 55
    (celcius)

  12. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    JF Mezei wrote:
    > Oh, another thing:
    > I forget the magic intantation, but most of DEC's consoles had some
    > commands to do extensive tests of various hardware in the box.
    >


    ISTR that the "magic incantation" was "TEST N" where N was an integer
    that designated the test to be performed.

    This does not do you a whole lot of good unless you have, or can get, a
    copy of the manual that tells you what each test does and how to
    interpret the results.



  13. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    Alright, I'm going to try to respond to all of the questions that I've
    seen in the thread. Thanks for you help folks!

    1. It is a pedestal system. (Steve)

    2. The memory that I found installed: (johnwalla... sorry I don't see
    your proper name!)

    4x 32 MB Viking Components unknown model
    4x 8 MB Digital 54-21246-BA (36 bit according to Google)
    4x 256 MB Dataram 61990 AO (36 bit as well, same source)

    3. The history of the box (johnwalla...)

    It was a server running *BSD at a certain engineering in the United
    States. When they dumped it, a former student took it and left it in
    his closet until he gave it to me a few years later. I don't think
    that he even turned it on.

    4. System unit part numbers (johnwalla...)

    Exterior: model no PB76C-FA Rev A01
    Backplane: 54-23499-02 A01
    CPU daughtercard: 54-24799-02 C02 and the "glue logic" chips show
    21172-BA
    CPU: 21-43918-01 revision D

    (I believe that we're looking at a 21164 EV5 so it may have been field
    upgraded.)

    5. set console graphics \ init (David Turner)

    I will plug this command in straight away just to be sure -- once the
    unit powers up again! Will keep in mind the S3Trio64 if and when I
    determine that the system is salvageable. Moreover, the PBXGA has
    jumpers that may be poorly set since I can't get my hands on a manual.
    However, since the system doesn't like to turn on correctly (with or
    without the card), I sense that that the problem lies elsewhere.

    6. The video card is installed in slot 11 (primary).

    7. Monitor -- it's a recent, multisync LCD that supports sync-on-green
    (although I'm not sure that this is necessary given the card). When it
    do get a console display, there is no flickering and the image is
    well, just perfect. Until it goes black.

    8. Time the delay and check CPU temp (JF Mezei)

    Good idea, JF. The next time it powers up properly (over the past 20
    power cycles, I haven't gotten even that far), I will time the delay
    and try the command for the temperature.

    7. Use the 600A owner's guide (johnwalla...)

    I've looked through it. The memory configuration looks identical to
    mine and the troubleshooting guide is better written than that of the
    1000a... But it still remains that the 1 beep (_only_ audible when
    I've obtained a "successful" power up) does not correspond to list
    error codes.

    I'm going to find out about disabling the fan tests. All fans appear
    to function well. Will report back! :-)

    - Alex

  14. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    On Oct 20, 9:09*pm, jacquesal
    wrote:
    > I'm going to find out about disabling the fan tests. All fans appear
    > to function well. Will report back! :-)


    I disabled J52 (temperature shutdown) and put the daughtercard boot
    jumper in fail-safe mode. The OCP lit up straight away and I heard
    1-3-3 (bad RAM), before the self tests stalled! I looked at the RAM
    and noticed that one SIMM was poorly inserted (I had pulled it to see
    the model number) so I turned the machine off and reseated the SIMM. I
    have had no luck getting the system to power on correctly again (and
    I've tried six or seven times). I've disabled the fan checks and have
    played around with the boot mode jumpers on the CPU daughtercard. The
    fans turn on, but no OCP and no console. Frustrating!

    - Alex

  15. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    On Mon, 20 Oct 2008 18:48:58 -0700 (PDT)
    jacquesal wrote:

    > On Oct 20, 9:09*pm, jacquesal
    > wrote:
    > > I'm going to find out about disabling the fan tests. All fans appear
    > > to function well. Will report back! :-)

    >
    > I disabled J52 (temperature shutdown) and put the daughtercard boot
    > jumper in fail-safe mode. The OCP lit up straight away and I heard
    > 1-3-3 (bad RAM), before the self tests stalled! I looked at the RAM
    > and noticed that one SIMM was poorly inserted (I had pulled it to see
    > the model number) so I turned the machine off and reseated the SIMM. I
    > have had no luck getting the system to power on correctly again (and
    > I've tried six or seven times). I've disabled the fan checks and have
    > played around with the boot mode jumpers on the CPU daughtercard. The
    > fans turn on, but no OCP and no console. Frustrating!
    >
    > - Alex


    Did you unplug everything, that's not necessary for a basic startup
    (i.e. controller cards, video card, all the memory except for one bank,
    etc pp) and see if it comes up with output on serial?
    In case of defective memory, you might have to swap your memory kits
    through until you find one that works.
    Troubleshooting with a fully equipped box is always a bit painful

    Marc


  16. Re: AlphaServer 1000a screen blanks after self test

    On Oct 21, 2:48 am, jacquesal
    wrote:
    > On Oct 20, 9:09 pm, jacquesal
    > wrote:
    >
    > > I'm going to find out about disabling the fan tests. All fans appear
    > > to function well. Will report back! :-)

    >
    > I disabled J52 (temperature shutdown) and put the daughtercard boot
    > jumper in fail-safe mode. The OCP lit up straight away and I heard
    > 1-3-3 (bad RAM), before the self tests stalled! I looked at the RAM
    > and noticed that one SIMM was poorly inserted (I had pulled it to see
    > the model number) so I turned the machine off and reseated the SIMM. I
    > have had no luck getting the system to power on correctly again (and
    > I've tried six or seven times). I've disabled the fan checks and have
    > played around with the boot mode jumpers on the CPU daughtercard. The
    > fans turn on, but no OCP and no console. Frustrating!
    >
    > - Alex


    Frustrating indeed! Thanks for all the gory detail; we can now be
    quite confident that you have an EV5/21164 box, which may make the
    motherboard references in the EV4/21064 docs irrelevant.

    Fortunately, one single beep *is* in Table 4-3 of the 600A Owners
    Guide (page 4-7) at
    http://h18000.www1.hp.com/alphaserve...655-ui-a01.pdf
    (apologies for formatting):
    "Beep code/Meaning/Action
    1 at system startup/System start-up is successful/None"

    Unfortunately your system startup isn't 100% successful yet.

    You say you "put the daughtercard boot jumper in fail-safe mode"and
    "played around a bit" but don't say explicitly whether you've put the
    Fail Safe Loader jumper back to its "normal operation" position. You
    need to do that for normal operation, otherwise afaik you stay in "FSL
    mode" rather than normal mode.

    You actually might want to use FSL mode to check you have a valid set
    of firmware (ie update your firmware). There are brief and
    insufficient details starting on page 4-26 of the manual above. More
    extensive details appear to be on Hoff's website at http://64.223.189.234/node/673
    which also includes a link to a collection of AlphaServer manuals at
    vt100.net - in particular, there is a "AlphaServer 1000/1000A Model 5/
    xxx Owner's Guide Supplement" where Chapter 1 at least looks relevant
    and Chapter 2 would be relevant if we could get you working
    consistently to the ">>>" prompt... the rest of that manual is
    AlphaBIOS stuff, currently irrelevant.

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