Text file generated by a Cobol application - VMS

This is a discussion on Text file generated by a Cobol application - VMS ; Hi: Im a newbie in VMS, and Im looking for a way to remove all hidden characters in a text file to get only pure text. Thanks...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Text file generated by a Cobol application

  1. Text file generated by a Cobol application

    Hi:
    Im a newbie in VMS, and Im looking for a way to remove
    all hidden characters in a text file to get only pure text.
    Thanks

  2. Re: Text file generated by a Cobol application

    On Sep 23, 11:20*pm, apogeusiste...@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi:
    > Im a newbie in VMS, and Im looking for a way to remove
    > all hidden characters in a text file to get only pure text.
    > Thanks


    Are you referring to the printer carriage control information? To
    understand to what is referred to in the original post it would be
    helpful if the Carriage Control portion of the output from a DIRECTORY/
    FULL command were provided.

    - Bob Gezelter, http://www.rlgsc.com

  3. Re: Text file generated by a Cobol application

    Hi,

    wrote in message
    news:f6da089e-1bd3-42d5-af3c-adf3d2b23482@k13g2000hse.googlegroups.com...
    Hi:
    Im a newbie in VMS, and Im looking for a way to remove
    all hidden characters in a text file to get only pure text.
    Thanks

    Created by the COBOL Report Writer?

    $CONVERT/FDL might be worth a look?

    Cheers Richard Maher



  4. Re: Text file generated by a Cobol application

    On Sep 24, 6:44*am, "Richard Maher"
    wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > wrote in message
    >
    > news:f6da089e-1bd3-42d5-af3c-adf3d2b23482@k13g2000hse.googlegroups.com...
    > Hi:
    > Im a newbie in VMS, and Im looking for a way to remove
    > all hidden characters in a text file to get only pure text.
    > Thanks
    >
    > Created by the COBOL Report Writer?
    >
    > $CONVERT/FDL might be worth a look?
    >
    > Cheers Richard Maher


    And so too might

    $ TYPE/OUTPUT=newfile.txt oldfile.dat

    depending upon what those hidden characters are.

  5. Re: Text file generated by a Cobol application

    In article , apogeusistemas@gmail.com writes:
    > Hi:
    > I=B4m a newbie in VMS, and I=B4m looking for a way to remove
    > all hidden characters in a text file to get only pure text.
    > Thanks


    I'll assume that "=B4" is MIME for one of the Microsoft "smart
    quotes". Please turn them off, quotes that can only be read on MS
    stuff are pretty dumb.

    As for your question: DUMP will show you printable characters and
    a lot more. gnu strings will probably run on VMS. Otherwise, you
    get to do some programming.


  6. Re: Text file generated by a Cobol application

    apogeusistemas@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi:
    > Im a newbie in VMS, and Im looking for a way to remove
    > all hidden characters in a text file to get only pure text.
    > Thanks


    I can't think of a tool that will do this automagically! It should be
    fairly simple, however, to write a small program that checks for
    alpha-numeric and punctuation characters only.

    What problem are you trying to solve? Most text files are ALREADY pure
    text! Some programs may insert for line breaks but, other than
    that, I can't think of any reason that a program should insert weird
    characters in a text file!


  7. Re: Text file generated by a Cobol application

    "Richard B. Gilbert" wrote in message
    news:OaidnU_L0shMWEfVnZ2dnUVZ_srinZ2d@comcast.com. ..
    > apogeusistemas@gmail.com wrote:
    >> Hi:
    >> Im a newbie in VMS, and Im looking for a way to remove
    >> all hidden characters in a text file to get only pure text.
    >> Thanks

    >
    > I can't think of a tool that will do this automagically! It should be
    > fairly simple, however, to write a small program that checks for
    > alpha-numeric and punctuation characters only.
    >
    > What problem are you trying to solve? Most text files are ALREADY pure
    > text! Some programs may insert for line breaks but, other than
    > that, I can't think of any reason that a program should insert weird
    > characters in a text file!
    >


    Not to stomp on the OP's problem, but while I was working on a text to PDF
    program, I came across a couple of our reports that print on the line
    printer just fine, but if you type or convert them, it looks like LF's (not
    CR) that are interpreted by the PDF converter and type as CR/LF. Looking at
    the Cobol code to figure this out, they write some data, seem to do a CR and
    insert that number of spaces then insert the next set of data, another CR,
    another insert of spaces (to the same column they were prining on) and more
    data. I'm thinking (not being a Cobol programmer) it was some kind of
    buffer problem but the night operator (who was a programmer for many years
    before semi-retirement) mentioned it might have been a timing issue for the
    serial printers of the time. So it is possible something like this is being
    seen.


  8. Re: Text file generated by a Cobol application

    koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes:

    >In article , apogeusistemas@gmail.com writes:
    >> Hi:
    >> I=B4m a newbie in VMS, and I=B4m looking for a way to remove
    >> all hidden characters in a text file to get only pure text.
    >> Thanks


    > I'll assume that "=B4" is MIME for one of the Microsoft "smart
    > quotes". Please turn them off, quotes that can only be read on MS
    > stuff are pretty dumb.


    Actually the character set used is ISO-8859-1 which is nearly identical to
    the ISO-LATIN-1 used by DEC equipment since the VT220. However, it was
    posted using Google Groups which encodes 8 bit characters as MIME/
    quoted-printable, producing the "=B4" if using a newsreader that doesn't
    understand quoted-printable. The character used is the "acute accent"
    which to many people looks like another apostrophe.

    Which brings up a question: Does anyone know of a newsreader for VMS that
    properly handles MIME and quoted-printable, and preferably character sets
    beyond straight ASCII and ISO-8859-1?

  9. Re: Text file generated by a Cobol application

    Michael Moroney wrote:

    > Which brings up a question: Does anyone know of a newsreader for VMS that
    > properly handles MIME and quoted-printable, and preferably character sets
    > beyond straight ASCII and ISO-8859-1?


    Mozilla does. Yeah, it is very resource hungry, but the newsreader
    function (which also handles emails) is recent enough to handle current
    character sets and encodings.

  10. Re: Text file generated by a Cobol application

    In article , moroney@world.std.spaamtrap.com (Michael Moroney) writes:
    > Which brings up a question: Does anyone know of a newsreader for VMS that
    > properly handles MIME and quoted-printable, and preferably character sets
    > beyond straight ASCII and ISO-8859-1?


    Mozilla.


  11. Re: Text file generated by a Cobol application

    On Sep 24, 6:20*am, apogeusiste...@gmail.com wrote:
    > Hi:
    > Im a newbie in VMS, and Im looking for a way to remove
    > all hidden characters in a text file to get only pure text.
    > Thanks


    IMHO the easiest way would be using TPU (also has the advantage that
    you would learn TPU...)

    the following is CONTROL.TPU - change to suit yourself:


    ! CONTROL.TPU
    ! TPU procedure to remove ASCII 1 - 31 characters from a file
    !
    ! Usage: EDIT/TPU/NOSECTIO/COMMAND=CONTROL.TPU
    !
    ! Mike Rechtman, 1996
    PROCEDURE global_delete( X )
    LOCAL src_range, CONTROL_

    ON_ERROR
    RETURN;
    ENDON_ERROR;

    CONTROL_ := ASCII(X);
    LOOP
    src_range := SEARCH( CONTROL_,FORWARD );
    ERASE( src_range );
    ENDLOOP;
    ENDPROCEDURE;

    LOCAL X
    file_spec := GET_INFO( COMMAND_LINE,"file_name" );
    next_file := "";
    next_file := File_Search (file_spec);
    msg_txt := FAO(" Working on !AS " , next_file);
    MESSAGE ( msg_txt ) ;
    main_buffer := CREATE_BUFFER( "main",next_file ) ;
    X := 0 ;
    Loop
    X := X+1 ;
    Exitif X > 31 ;
    POSITION( BEGINNING_OF( main_buffer ) ) ;
    global_delete( X ) ;
    Endloop ;
    WRITE_FILE( main_buffer ) ;
    DELETE ( main_buffer ) ;
    EXIT ;
    !


    Mike R
    http://alpha.mike-r.com

  12. quoting characters (was: Text file generated by a Cobol application)

    On 2008-09-24 15:36, "Bob Koehler" wrote:

    > I'll assume that "=B4" is MIME for one of the Microsoft "smart
    > quotes". Please turn them off, quotes that can only be read on MS
    > stuff are pretty dumb.


    No, it is "Acute Accent" according to the ISO-8859-1 character set [1]
    specified in the header.

    > [...]


    Michael


    [1] ftp://ftp.unicode.org/Public/MAPPING...859/8859-1.TXT

    --
    Real names enhance the probability of getting real answers.
    My e-mail account at DECUS Munich is no longer valid.


  13. Re: quoting characters

    Michael Unger wrote:
    > On 2008-09-24 15:36, "Bob Koehler" wrote:
    >
    >> I'll assume that "=B4" is MIME for one of the Microsoft "smart
    >> quotes". Please turn them off, quotes that can only be read on MS
    >> stuff are pretty dumb.

    >
    > No, it is "Acute Accent" according to the ISO-8859-1 character set [1]
    > specified in the header.


    http://www.vaxination.ca/vms/charset/charset.jpg
    or
    http://www.vaxination.ca/vms/charset/charset.pdf
    or
    http://www.vaxination.ca/vms/charset/charset.ps

    B4 is a fancy quote character/apostrophe. It can be seen as an acute
    accent. However, there are mappings for all accented characters so an
    "e" acute is E9 for instance, so there is no need for the individual
    accent.

  14. Re: quoting characters

    > http://www.vaxination.ca/vms/charset/charset.jpg

    Did Apple Computer sponsor Character Code F0?

  15. Re: quoting characters

    Michael Moroney wrote:
    >> http://www.vaxination.ca/vms/charset/charset.jpg

    >
    > Did Apple Computer sponsor Character Code F0?


    eh ! Eh It is because this had been rasterized on my old mac with Mac
    fonts that had a few additions to them.

  16. Re: quoting characters

    JF Mezei wrote:
    > Michael Moroney wrote:
    >>> http://www.vaxination.ca/vms/charset/charset.jpg

    >>
    >> Did Apple Computer sponsor Character Code F0?


    I ran the postscript on Preview on OS-X to create a new .jpg:

    http://www.vaxination.ca/vms/charset/charset1.jpg

    This one has proper font encoding without the apple logo. It is a bigger
    image. (I didn't bother scaling it). If there is overwhelming support, I
    might consider forming a committee who would then strike a task force to
    study the possibility of moving charset1 to charset and make it the
    default image and report back to the committee who would then report
    back to me.

  17. Re: quoting characters

    On 2008-09-26 22:57, "JF Mezei" wrote:

    > [...]
    >
    > B4 is a fancy quote character/apostrophe. It can be seen as an acute
    > accent. [...]


    Obviously you didn't read the ISO-8859-1 reference [1] mentioned
    previously ...

    Michael


    [1]

    --
    Real names enhance the probability of getting real answers.
    My e-mail account at DECUS Munich is no longer valid.

  18. Re: quoting characters

    Michael Unger wrote:

    > Obviously you didn't read the ISO-8859-1 reference [1] mentioned
    > previously ...
    > [1]


    OK, so it is called different names. Some call it spacing acute.

    It appears that Microsoft has decided to use the spacing accent as
    closing single quote, and the normal apostrophe as opening quote or
    something to that effect.

    Note that for desktop publishing, there are many addition typographical
    encodings which are not part of ISO-8859-1 but are in the font encodings
    (which is what had confused me some) (opening/closing single quote and
    double quotes for instance).

  19. Re: quoting characters

    On 2008-09-27 23:47, "JF Mezei" wrote:

    > Michael Unger wrote:
    >
    >> Obviously you didn't read the ISO-8859-1 reference [1] mentioned
    >> previously ...
    >> [1]

    >
    > OK, so it is called different names. Some call it spacing acute.


    AFAIK they are called "floating accents" in Type 1 fonts.

    > [...]
    >
    > Note that for desktop publishing, there are many addition typographical
    > encodings which are not part of ISO-8859-1 but are in the font encodings
    > (which is what had confused me some) (opening/closing single quote and
    > double quotes for instance).


    Yes, "General Punctuation" (U+2018 ... U+201E), added by the Unicode
    Consortium -- see [1] and [2] for reference.

    Michael


    [1]
    [2]

    --
    Real names enhance the probability of getting real answers.
    My e-mail account at DECUS Munich is no longer valid.


+ Reply to Thread