OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available - VMS

This is a discussion on OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available - VMS ; - Start Date: Oct 1, 2008 - Location: Syracuse, NY - Duration: 6 months, 50% of the work can be done off-site http://www.openvms.org/stories.php?s.../09/15/8306704...

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  1. OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    - Start Date: Oct 1, 2008
    - Location: Syracuse, NY
    - Duration: 6 months, 50% of the work can be done off-site


    http://www.openvms.org/stories.php?s.../09/15/8306704

  2. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    On Sep 16, 4:58*am, IanMiller wrote:
    > - Start Date: Oct 1, 2008
    > - Location: Syracuse, NY
    > - Duration: 6 months, 50% of the work can be done off-site
    >
    > http://www.openvms.org/stories.php?s.../09/15/8306704


    That's interesting. It says this will be a "migration from the legacy
    systems" and onto an AlphaServer 2100.

    I never thought I'd see an AS2100 considered non-legacy again.

    :-)

  3. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    In article
    <83d2835f-dda1-44cb-b36a-166393c7f729@25g2000hsx.googlegroups.com>,
    FrankS writes:

    > That's interesting. It says this will be a "migration from the legacy
    > systems" and onto an AlphaServer 2100.
    >
    > I never thought I'd see an AS2100 considered non-legacy again.


    Is this the EV4 or EV45 AS2100?


  4. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    In article , helbig@astro.multiCLOTHESvax.de (Phillip Helbig---remove CLOTHES to reply) writes:
    >In article
    ><83d2835f-dda1-44cb-b36a-166393c7f729@25g2000hsx.googlegroups.com>,
    >FrankS writes:
    >
    >> That's interesting. It says this will be a "migration from the legacy
    >> systems" and onto an AlphaServer 2100.
    >>
    >> I never thought I'd see an AS2100 considered non-legacy again.

    >
    >Is this the EV4 or EV45 AS2100?


    I've fired off an email to the POC for more information.

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    .... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    Copr. 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Publication of _this_ usenet article outside
    of usenet _must_ include its contents in its entirety including this copyright
    notice, disclaimer and quotations.

  5. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    I recall that the AS2100 was tricky to write IO drivers for because
    the system had several bus addressing modes to map the IO address
    space in the longword space of the CPU. So if you wanted to get to a
    byte addressed register on a card you would change the mapping so that
    byte addresses on the bus were found on longword address from the CPUs
    point of view. And I think specify a base address as well, since the
    32 (or was it 64?) bit address of the bus as seen as bytes was larger
    that the physical address space of the EV4.

    Once the word and byte operands were added (EV5?), and IO boards
    understood longword only register spacing, this problem went away,
    leaving the 2100 and it's relatives (seems like the 2000, 1200, and
    one other...) with unique IO driver requirements.

    They must have a lot of 2100s to make this worthwhile...


    Sean

    On Sep 16, 5:16*am, VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG wrote:
    > In article , hel...@astro.multiCLOTHESvax.de (Phillip Helbig---remove CLOTHES to reply) writes:
    >
    > >In article
    > ><83d2835f-dda1-44cb-b36a-166393c7f...@25g2000hsx.googlegroups.com>,
    > >FrankS writes:

    >
    > >> That's interesting. *It says this will be a "migration from the legacy
    > >> systems" and onto an AlphaServer 2100.

    >
    > >> I never thought I'd see an AS2100 considered non-legacy again.

    >
    > >Is this the EV4 or EV45 AS2100? *

    >
    > I've fired off an email to the POC for more information. *
    >
    > --
    > VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker * * *VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM
    >
    > ... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    > no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)
    >
    > Copr. 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. *Publication of _this_ usenet article outside
    > of usenet _must_ include its contents in its entirety including this copyright
    > notice, disclaimer and quotations.



  6. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    On Sep 16, 6:54 pm, s...@obanion.us wrote:
    > I recall that the AS2100 was tricky to write IO drivers for because
    > the system had several bus addressing modes to map the IO address
    > space in the longword space of the CPU. So if you wanted to get to a
    > byte addressed register on a card you would change the mapping so that
    > byte addresses on the bus were found on longword address from the CPUs
    > point of view. And I think specify a base address as well, since the
    > 32 (or was it 64?) bit address of the bus as seen as bytes was larger
    > that the physical address space of the EV4.
    >
    > Once the word and byte operands were added (EV5?), and IO boards
    > understood longword only register spacing, this problem went away,
    > leaving the 2100 and it's relatives (seems like the 2000, 1200, and
    > one other...) with unique IO driver requirements.
    >
    > They must have a lot of 2100s to make this worthwhile...
    >
    > Sean
    >
    > On Sep 16, 5:16 am, VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG wrote:
    >
    > > In article , hel...@astro.multiCLOTHESvax.de (Phillip Helbig---remove CLOTHES to reply) writes:

    >
    > > >In article
    > > ><83d2835f-dda1-44cb-b36a-166393c7f...@25g2000hsx.googlegroups.com>,
    > > >FrankS writes:

    >
    > > >> That's interesting. It says this will be a "migration from the legacy
    > > >> systems" and onto an AlphaServer 2100.

    >
    > > >> I never thought I'd see an AS2100 considered non-legacy again.

    >
    > > >Is this the EV4 or EV45 AS2100?

    >
    > > I've fired off an email to the POC for more information.

    >
    > > --
    > > VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    >
    > > ... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    > > no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    >
    > > Copr. 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Publication of _this_ usenet article outside
    > > of usenet _must_ include its contents in its entirety including this copyright
    > > notice, disclaimer and quotations.


    There were 2100s with EV5/21164 too. They were certainly sold with EV5
    (eg see SOC [1]) and (iirc) there might even have been field upgrades
    from the EV4/21064 to EV5/21164. Didn't Raytheon do a repackaged 2100
    (their Model 940), with flight-compatible stuff like conduction-cooled
    boards and what have you? The software and most of the hardware
    wouldn't care about whose badge was on the system, but it could well
    be important to the flight and certification people.

    Wrt the byte/word thing: It's not really the "IO boards" themselves
    that are the issue - they're mostly relatively standard PCI stuff in
    most 2100s and similar-era systems, maybe with EISA too. Maybe you
    mean the companion IO board in the 2100 which sat between CPU and main
    IO buses, a board whose name I forget. The real challenge in Alphas of
    that era is in the CPU->PCI chipset and (as you already mentioned)
    primarily the lack of true byte/word operands in earlier Alphas, which
    led to "sparse mode" addressing in PCI space (deep joy). Fixed in a
    historic major release, fortunately. But by then the damage had been
    done.

    Anyway, from the advert: "The US Air Force is developing a Radar
    software program for a line of aircraft in OpenVMS using Alpha 2100.
    They will be doing development as well as migration from the legacy
    systems. They will be doing driver design of radar driver software.
    This is in a VME/PCI environment."

    Three things stand out:
    0) USAF
    1) these systems will be flying (and certified for flying), and
    therefore there will likely be lots of cost involved if anything
    significant changes in the hardware (and presumably software). That's
    probably a manageable risk given the right approach. There's probably
    lots of cost already, what's a little extra anyway.
    2) There are PCI<>VME adaptors in this picture. That's a different set
    of risks, still manageable, but much care will be needed, not least
    because of aforementioned byte/word addressing issues, which become
    particularly interesting on the PCI/VME adaptors, which aren't exactly
    common, and may even require consideration of matters like bigendian
    vs littleendian.

    So it's likely not a "huge" number of 2100s, but could easily be a
    huge cost to change to anything significantly different either in
    software or in hardware.

    Interesting opportunity for someone. Hopefully rewarding too.

    [1] http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/q...C/QB002BPF.PDF

  7. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available


    wrote in message
    news:a8d45bfb-f4a4-41c3-bee1-074c9c9b6a73@26g2000hsk.googlegroups.com...
    > On Sep 16, 6:54 pm, s...@obanion.us wrote:
    >> I recall that the AS2100 was tricky to write IO drivers for because
    >> the system had several bus addressing modes to map the IO address
    >> space in the longword space of the CPU. So if you wanted to get to a
    >> byte addressed register on a card you would change the mapping so that
    >> byte addresses on the bus were found on longword address from the CPUs
    >> point of view. And I think specify a base address as well, since the
    >> 32 (or was it 64?) bit address of the bus as seen as bytes was larger
    >> that the physical address space of the EV4.
    >>
    >> Once the word and byte operands were added (EV5?), and IO boards
    >> understood longword only register spacing, this problem went away,
    >> leaving the 2100 and it's relatives (seems like the 2000, 1200, and
    >> one other...) with unique IO driver requirements.
    >>
    >> They must have a lot of 2100s to make this worthwhile...
    >>
    >> Sean
    >>
    >> On Sep 16, 5:16 am, VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG wrote:
    >>
    >> > In article , hel...@astro.multiCLOTHESvax.de
    >> > (Phillip Helbig---remove CLOTHES to reply) writes:

    >>
    >> > >In article
    >> > ><83d2835f-dda1-44cb-b36a-166393c7f...@25g2000hsx.googlegroups.com>,
    >> > >FrankS writes:

    >>
    >> > >> That's interesting. It says this will be a "migration from the
    >> > >> legacy
    >> > >> systems" and onto an AlphaServer 2100.

    >>
    >> > >> I never thought I'd see an AS2100 considered non-legacy again.

    >>
    >> > >Is this the EV4 or EV45 AS2100?

    >>
    >> > I've fired off an email to the POC for more information.

    >>
    >> > --
    >> > VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker
    >> > VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    >>
    >> > ... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional
    >> > protection
    >> > no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be.
    >> > (NJSC)

    >>
    >> > Copr. 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Publication of _this_ usenet article
    >> > outside
    >> > of usenet _must_ include its contents in its entirety including this
    >> > copyright
    >> > notice, disclaimer and quotations.

    >
    > There were 2100s with EV5/21164 too. They were certainly sold with EV5
    > (eg see SOC [1]) and (iirc) there might even have been field upgrades
    > from the EV4/21064 to EV5/21164. Didn't Raytheon do a repackaged 2100
    > (their Model 940), with flight-compatible stuff like conduction-cooled
    > boards and what have you? The software and most of the hardware
    > wouldn't care about whose badge was on the system, but it could well
    > be important to the flight and certification people.
    >
    > Wrt the byte/word thing: It's not really the "IO boards" themselves
    > that are the issue - they're mostly relatively standard PCI stuff in
    > most 2100s and similar-era systems, maybe with EISA too. Maybe you
    > mean the companion IO board in the 2100 which sat between CPU and main
    > IO buses, a board whose name I forget. The real challenge in Alphas of
    > that era is in the CPU->PCI chipset and (as you already mentioned)
    > primarily the lack of true byte/word operands in earlier Alphas, which
    > led to "sparse mode" addressing in PCI space (deep joy). Fixed in a
    > historic major release, fortunately. But by then the damage had been
    > done.
    >
    > Anyway, from the advert: "The US Air Force is developing a Radar
    > software program for a line of aircraft in OpenVMS using Alpha 2100.
    > They will be doing development as well as migration from the legacy
    > systems. They will be doing driver design of radar driver software.
    > This is in a VME/PCI environment."
    >
    > Three things stand out:
    > 0) USAF
    > 1) these systems will be flying (and certified for flying), and
    > therefore there will likely be lots of cost involved if anything
    > significant changes in the hardware (and presumably software). That's
    > probably a manageable risk given the right approach. There's probably
    > lots of cost already, what's a little extra anyway.
    > 2) There are PCI<>VME adaptors in this picture. That's a different set
    > of risks, still manageable, but much care will be needed, not least
    > because of aforementioned byte/word addressing issues, which become
    > particularly interesting on the PCI/VME adaptors, which aren't exactly
    > common, and may even require consideration of matters like bigendian
    > vs littleendian.
    >
    > So it's likely not a "huge" number of 2100s, but could easily be a
    > huge cost to change to anything significantly different either in
    > software or in hardware.
    >
    > Interesting opportunity for someone. Hopefully rewarding too.
    >
    > [1] http://h18000.www1.hp.com/products/q...C/QB002BPF.PDF



    Who is the radar manufacturer you can see on the north side of I-95 as you
    drive by? I can't recall whether it is Raytheon or GE -- it's been a while
    since I passed through the area. Long history of EW stuff in that area -
    especially when Griffiss AFB @ Rome, NY was the EW headquarters.



  8. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    In article ,
    "John Smith" writes:
    >
    > Who is the radar manufacturer you can see on the north side of I-95 as you
    > drive by? I can't recall whether it is Raytheon or GE -- it's been a while
    > since I passed through the area. Long history of EW stuff in that area -
    > especially when Griffiss AFB @ Rome, NY was the EW headquarters.


    Ummm..... I-95 doesn't go anywhere near Rome, NY. That's I-81.

    bill


    --
    Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    billg999@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    University of Scranton |
    Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include

  9. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    > In article ,
    > "John Smith" writes:
    >> Who is the radar manufacturer you can see on the north side of I-95 as you
    >> drive by? I can't recall whether it is Raytheon or GE -- it's been a while
    >> since I passed through the area. Long history of EW stuff in that area -
    >> especially when Griffiss AFB @ Rome, NY was the EW headquarters.

    >
    > Ummm..... I-95 doesn't go anywhere near Rome, NY. That's I-81.
    >
    > bill
    >
    >


    Perhaps he is talking about the "ship in the cornfield" just off I-295
    in New Jersey. There is a structure that looks more or less like the
    top of a ship with antennas all over it. Once upon a time I knew who
    ran it but my memory grows DIMM. Perhaps it will come back to me.

  10. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    In article , "Richard B. Gilbert" writes:
    >
    > Perhaps he is talking about the "ship in the cornfield" just off I-295
    > in New Jersey. There is a structure that looks more or less like the
    > top of a ship with antennas all over it. Once upon a time I knew who
    > ran it but my memory grows DIMM. Perhaps it will come back to me.


    There is a cruiser superstructure between 295 and the turnpike in
    New Jersey. It was used as part of the Aegis development. It
    says NAVY and AEGIS all over it.

    But when your headed south on the turnpike all you see at first is
    the superstructure west of the road. Sure looks like you're
    approaching deep water from the wrong side.


  11. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    Bob Koehler wrote:
    > In article , "Richard B. Gilbert" writes:
    >> Perhaps he is talking about the "ship in the cornfield" just off I-295
    >> in New Jersey. There is a structure that looks more or less like the
    >> top of a ship with antennas all over it. Once upon a time I knew who
    >> ran it but my memory grows DIMM. Perhaps it will come back to me.

    >
    > There is a cruiser superstructure between 295 and the turnpike in
    > New Jersey. It was used as part of the Aegis development. It
    > says NAVY and AEGIS all over it.
    >
    > But when your headed south on the turnpike all you see at first is
    > the superstructure west of the road. Sure looks like you're
    > approaching deep water from the wrong side.
    >

    That would be Lockheed Martin Maritime Systems & Sensors (MS2) near/in
    Moorestown (sp?) NJ, I believe.


    /danno

  12. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    In article , "Richard B. Gilbert" writes:
    >Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >> In article ,
    >> "John Smith" writes:
    >>> Who is the radar manufacturer you can see on the north side of I-95 as you
    >>> drive by? I can't recall whether it is Raytheon or GE -- it's been a while
    >>> since I passed through the area. Long history of EW stuff in that area -
    >>> especially when Griffiss AFB @ Rome, NY was the EW headquarters.

    >>
    >> Ummm..... I-95 doesn't go anywhere near Rome, NY. That's I-81.
    >>
    >> bill
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Perhaps he is talking about the "ship in the cornfield" just off I-295
    >in New Jersey. There is a structure that looks more or less like the
    >top of a ship with antennas all over it. Once upon a time I knew who
    >ran it but my memory grows DIMM. Perhaps it will come back to me.


    Isn't that Martin Marrietta?

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    .... pejorative statements of opinion are entitled to constitutional protection
    no matter how extreme, vituperous, or vigorously expressed they may be. (NJSC)

    Copr. 2008 Brian Schenkenberger. Publication of _this_ usenet article outside
    of usenet _must_ include its contents in its entirety including this copyright
    notice, disclaimer and quotations.

  13. Re: OpenVMS Architect/Consultant Position Available

    My bad --- should be I-90 as it passes through Syracuse, NY, near the
    intersection of the Electronics Parkway exit
    http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=4...19312&t=h&z=16




    "Bill Gunshannon" wrote in message
    news:6jcsukF2nr7oU1@mid.individual.net...
    > In article ,
    > "John Smith" writes:
    >>
    >> Who is the radar manufacturer you can see on the north side of I-95 as
    >> you
    >> drive by? I can't recall whether it is Raytheon or GE -- it's been a
    >> while
    >> since I passed through the area. Long history of EW stuff in that area -
    >> especially when Griffiss AFB @ Rome, NY was the EW headquarters.

    >
    > Ummm..... I-95 doesn't go anywhere near Rome, NY. That's I-81.
    >
    > bill
    >
    >
    > --
    > Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    > billg999@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    > University of Scranton |
    > Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include




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