Re: Wonderful things happen to an OS when it has an internal champion - VMS

This is a discussion on Re: Wonderful things happen to an OS when it has an internal champion - VMS ; > > None of them approaches the security level of say, z/OS secured with RACF. > That's built in security that goes down to the level of THIS user can see >THIS field ONLY when logged into THIS terminal and ...

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Thread: Re: Wonderful things happen to an OS when it has an internal champion

  1. Re: Wonderful things happen to an OS when it has an internal champion

    >
    > None of them approaches the security level of say, z/OS secured with RACF.
    > That's built in security that goes down to the level of THIS user can see >THIS field ONLY when logged into THIS terminal and authenticated THISway, >with full reporting and so forth. And it carries through the entire system.


    >ACLs used correctly and applied in detail to RDB databases provide
    >exactly that level of security. It was the first OS and relational
    >database to provide such capability and it can do it across an entire
    >globe spanning cluster, not a single "moat and fortress" site.


    I have never seen "ACLs" - meaning access control lists tied to a filesystem
    able to do what RACF does. I do not think we are talking about the same thing here.

    BTW: DB2 has had federated databases for more than a decade, well before Oracle. RDB is file based, I'm not sure how it can do that, especially over
    slower global WAN connections.

    -Paul




  2. Re: Wonderful things happen to an OS when it has an internal champion

    In article , "Paul Raulerson" writes:
    > ----=_vm_0011_W76983619_11016_1186677144
    > Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
    > Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


    Please stop doing that.

    > I have never seen "ACLs" - meaning access control lists tied to a filesys=
    > tem
    > able to do what RACF does. I do not think we are talking about the same t=
    > hing here.


    Certainly not. Rdb is a database management system, not a file system.

    > BTW: DB2 has had federated databases for more than a decade, well before =
    > Oracle.


    Your term "federated database" is not clear, but when you say "well
    before Oracle" you must be talking about "Classic" Oracle, which
    nobody here has proposed as an example of database security.

    > RDB is file based, I'm not sure how it can do that, especially over
    > slower global WAN connections.


    Rdb is a relational database that had the security features we are
    discussing well before it was purchased from Digital by Oracle, and
    that was quite a bit more than 10 years ago.

    Are you perhaps confusing the acronym "Rdb" with the acronym "RMS" ?
    Generally participants here are reasonably careful about the distinctions
    between the two.

  3. Re: Wonderful things happen to an OS when it has an internal champion

    On 08/09/07 11:32, Paul Raulerson wrote:
    [snip]
    >
    > BTW: DB2 has had federated databases for more than a decade, well
    > before Oracle. RDB is file based, I'm not sure how it can do
    > that, especially over slower global WAN connections.


    As Larry has mentioned, you are probably confusing Rdb (the rdbms
    that DEC sold to Oracle back in 1994) with RMS. I doubt you've
    purchased an Rdb license from Oracle...

    Clustering is deeply embedded into Rdb, but the latencies probably
    mean that WAN connections are too slow.

    ACMS (the VMS equivalent of CICS) can probably successfully tie
    disparate Rdb databases together.

    COBOL+ACMS+DECforms+Rdb would make look pretty familiar to a mainframer.

    --
    Ron Johnson, Jr.
    Jefferson LA USA

    Give a man a fish, and he eats for a day.
    Hit him with a fish, and he goes away for good!

  4. Re: Wonderful things happen to an OS when it has an internal champion

    On Thu, 09 Aug 2007 11:31:50 -0700, Ron Johnson
    wrote:

    > On 08/09/07 11:32, Paul Raulerson wrote:
    > [snip]
    >>
    >> BTW: DB2 has had federated databases for more than a decade, well
    >> before Oracle. RDB is file based, I'm not sure how it can do
    >> that, especially over slower global WAN connections.

    >
    > As Larry has mentioned, you are probably confusing Rdb (the rdbms
    > that DEC sold to Oracle back in 1994) with RMS. I doubt you've
    > purchased an Rdb license from Oracle...
    >
    > Clustering is deeply embedded into Rdb, but the latencies probably
    > mean that WAN connections are too slow.
    >
    > ACMS (the VMS equivalent of CICS) can probably successfully tie
    > disparate Rdb databases together.
    >
    > COBOL+ACMS+DECforms+Rdb would make look pretty familiar to a mainframer.
    >

    Well for main frame, you need to add PL/I to that lot


    --
    PL/I for OpenVMS
    www.kednos.com

  5. Re: Wonderful things happen to an OS when it has an internal champion

    > I have never seen "ACLs" - meaning access control lists tied to a filesystem
    > able to do what RACF does. I do not think we are talking about the same thing here.
    >


    ACLs aren't tied to a file system, they apply to any object in the OS,
    at least on a real OS.


  6. Re: Wonderful things happen to an OS when it has an internal champion

    >
    > ACMS (the VMS equivalent of CICS) can probably successfully tie
    > disparate Rdb databases together.


    Under DECdtm I have used ACMS to successfully execute a distributed
    transaction across 3 RDB databases, 4 MQ queues, 2 RMS Indexed files
    (with journalling) across 4 continents. But I had no idea what node
    in the global cluster things were executing on. Didn't care.


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