Re: What does GEM mean? - VMS

This is a discussion on Re: What does GEM mean? - VMS ; LOL! I would have guessed it to be an acronym as well - it is always written as GEM, not as Gem. That usually indicates something special about the word, such as it being an Acronym. -Paul...

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Thread: Re: What does GEM mean?

  1. Re: What does GEM mean?

    LOL! I would have guessed it to be an acronym as well - it is always written as GEM, not as Gem. That usually indicates something special about the word, such as it being an Acronym.

    -Paul



  2. Re: What does GEM mean?

    In article ,
    "Paul Raulerson" writes:
    > ----=_vm_0011_W8194019419_8437_1185382023
    > Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
    > Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
    >
    > LOL! I would have guessed it to be an acronym as well - it is always
    > written as GEM, not as Gem. That usually indicates something special
    > about the word, such as it being an Acronym.


    Or it indicates a system that doesn't have lowercase, like VMS. :-)

    bill


    --
    Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    bill@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    University of Scranton |
    Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include

  3. Re: What does GEM mean?

    In article <5grm6lF3h2n07U2@mid.individual.net>, bill@cs.uofs.edu (Bill Gunshannon) writes:
    >
    > Or it indicates a system that doesn't have lowercase, like VMS. :-)


    Poor joke. In 1978 VMS was the first system I used where I knew
    I could use lowercase and actually did.

    I suspect I could have gotten away with it on my PDP-10, but none
    of the manuals demonstrated it and most of our terminals didn't
    have it.


  4. Re: What does GEM mean?

    In article ,
    koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes:
    > In article <5grm6lF3h2n07U2@mid.individual.net>, bill@cs.uofs.edu (Bill Gunshannon) writes:
    >>
    >> Or it indicates a system that doesn't have lowercase, like VMS. :-)

    >
    > Poor joke. In 1978 VMS was the first system I used where I knew
    > I could use lowercase and actually did.
    >
    > I suspect I could have gotten away with it on my PDP-10, but none
    > of the manuals demonstrated it and most of our terminals didn't
    > have it.


    Hey, I think mixedcase is a good thing. But many people here don't
    share that opinion. :-)

    bill


    --
    Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    bill@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    University of Scranton |
    Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include

  5. Re: What does GEM mean?

    Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    > In article ,
    > koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes:
    >
    >>In article <5grm6lF3h2n07U2@mid.individual.net>, bill@cs.uofs.edu (Bill Gunshannon) writes:
    >>
    >>>Or it indicates a system that doesn't have lowercase, like VMS. :-)

    >>
    >> Poor joke. In 1978 VMS was the first system I used where I knew
    >> I could use lowercase and actually did.
    >>
    >> I suspect I could have gotten away with it on my PDP-10, but none
    >> of the manuals demonstrated it and most of our terminals didn't
    >> have it.

    >
    >
    > Hey, I think mixedcase is a good thing. But many people here don't
    > share that opinion. :-)
    >


    Mixed case is *not* the same thing as case-sensitivity. Once again
    you are misrepresenting the opinions of the vast majority of VMS
    users. ;-) (Come to think of it, there's only one person on c.o.v
    who is famous for having a broken shift key...)


    > bill
    >
    >


    P.S. This post was brought to you in mixed case by an OpenVMS system.

    --
    John Santos
    Evans Griffiths & Hart, Inc.
    781-861-0670 ext 539

  6. Re: What does GEM mean?

    On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 21:08:32 -0700, John Santos wrote:

    > Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >> In article ,
    >> koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes:
    >>
    >>> In article <5grm6lF3h2n07U2@mid.individual.net>, bill@cs.uofs.edu
    >>> (Bill Gunshannon) writes:
    >>>
    >>>> Or it indicates a system that doesn't have lowercase, like VMS. :-)
    >>>
    >>> Poor joke. In 1978 VMS was the first system I used where I knew
    >>> I could use lowercase and actually did.
    >>>
    >>> I suspect I could have gotten away with it on my PDP-10, but none
    >>> of the manuals demonstrated it and most of our terminals didn't
    >>> have it.

    >> Hey, I think mixedcase is a good thing. But many people here don't
    >> share that opinion. :-)
    >>

    >
    > Mixed case is *not* the same thing as case-sensitivity. Once again
    > you are misrepresenting the opinions of the vast majority of VMS
    > users. ;-) (Come to think of it, there's only one person on c.o.v
    > who is famous for having a broken shift key...)


    Here is a bit of esoterica for you
    http://de.scientificcommons.org/20647427 click on the link (Verknüpfungen)
    >
    >
    >> bill
    >>

    >
    > P.S. This post was brought to you in mixed case by an OpenVMS system.
    >




    --
    PL/I for OpenVMS
    www.kednos.com

  7. Re: What does GEM mean?

    Tom Linden wrote:
    >
    >
    > Here is a bit of esoterica for you
    > http://de.scientificcommons.org/20647427 click on the link (Verknüpfungen)
    >


    Interesting. Arthur Sale's comments about Pascal where on a draft
    standard. After that paper was published, the drafts (and eventual
    standard) now allows underlines in identifiers.

    Back in the 1980s, some group inside of DEC did an Internationalization
    study on VAX Pascal. They wanted the compiler to recognize upper and
    lower case versions of the same "word" where the spellings were
    different. For example, there are some French words that gain or loose
    an accent when changing case (and sometimes only in Quebec). There are
    German words like straße (5 chars long) and STRASSE (6 chars long).
    They wanted the Pascal compiler to treat both spellings as the same
    identifier. We passed around the report, got a good laugh, and shoved
    it in a drawer (I think I still have it).


    --
    John Reagan
    OpenVMS Pascal/Macro-32/COBOL Project Leader
    Hewlett-Packard Company

  8. Re: What does GEM mean?

    In article , John Reagan writes:
    >
    >
    >Tom Linden wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> Here is a bit of esoterica for you
    >> http://de.scientificcommons.org/20647427 click on the link (Verknüpfungen)
    >>

    >
    >Interesting. Arthur Sale's comments about Pascal where on a draft
    >standard. After that paper was published, the drafts (and eventual
    >standard) now allows underlines in identifiers.
    >
    >Back in the 1980s, some group inside of DEC did an Internationalization
    >study on VAX Pascal. They wanted the compiler to recognize upper and
    >lower case versions of the same "word" where the spellings were
    >different. For example, there are some French words that gain or loose
    >an accent when changing case (and sometimes only in Quebec). There are
    >German words like straße (5 chars long) and STRASSE (6 chars long).
    >They wanted the Pascal compiler to treat both spellings as the same
    >identifier. We passed around the report, got a good laugh, and shoved
    >it in a drawer (I think I still have it).


    Is that what it means when it says "this feature will be addressed at
    some future date?"

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    http://tmesis.com/drat.html

  9. Re: What does GEM mean?

    John Reagan wrote:
    > Tom Linden wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> Here is a bit of esoterica for you
    >> http://de.scientificcommons.org/20647427 click on the link
    >> (Verknüpfungen)
    >>

    >
    > Interesting. Arthur Sale's comments about Pascal where on a draft
    > standard. After that paper was published, the drafts (and eventual
    > standard) now allows underlines in identifiers.
    >
    > Back in the 1980s, some group inside of DEC did an Internationalization
    > study on VAX Pascal. They wanted the compiler to recognize upper and
    > lower case versions of the same "word" where the spellings were
    > different. For example, there are some French words that gain or loose
    > an accent when changing case (and sometimes only in Quebec). There are
    > German words like straße (5 chars long) and STRASSE (6 chars long). They
    > wanted the Pascal compiler to treat both spellings as the same
    > identifier. We passed around the report, got a good laugh, and shoved
    > it in a drawer (I think I still have it).
    >
    >


    And since then the germans has dropped the "double-s", so you'd better
    make a new revison anyway... :-)

    Jan-Erik.

  10. Re: What does GEM mean?

    Jan-Erik Söderholm wrote:

    >
    > And since then the germans has dropped the "double-s", so you'd better
    > make a new revison anyway... :-)
    >


    Well, not to side-track, but a quick Google search shows many
    publications like Der Spiegel have reverted to the old rules. Even the
    new rules in Rechtschreibreform seem to allow the double-s in some
    cases. "For the sharp (voiceless) [s] after a long vowel or dipththong
    one writes ß, as long as no other consonant follows in the word stem."
    So "daß" turns into "dass", but "groß" stays the same.


    --
    John (not a German speaker much less a German grammarian)

  11. Re: What does GEM mean?

    John Reagan wrote:

    > German words like straße (5 chars long) and STRASSE (6 chars long).


    and to compound the problem, I can't count. :-)


    --
    John Reagan
    OpenVMS Pascal/Macro-32/COBOL Project Leader
    Hewlett-Packard Company

  12. Re: What does GEM mean?

    On 07/27/07 11:25, Jan-Erik Söderholm wrote:
    > John Reagan wrote:

    [snip]
    >>
    >> Back in the 1980s, some group inside of DEC did an
    >> Internationalization study on VAX Pascal. They wanted the compiler to
    >> recognize upper and lower case versions of the same "word" where the
    >> spellings were different. For example, there are some French words
    >> that gain or loose an accent when changing case (and sometimes only in
    >> Quebec). There are German words like straße (5 chars long) and
    >> STRASSE (6 chars long). They wanted the Pascal compiler to treat both
    >> spellings as the same identifier. We passed around the report, got a
    >> good laugh, and shoved it in a drawer (I think I still have it).
    >>
    >>

    >
    > And since then the germans has dropped the "double-s", so you'd better
    > make a new revison anyway... :-)


    How can you just drop a letter from the alphabet?

    What happens to all the books/articles/letters/etc written prior to
    when the letter was dropped?

    --
    Ron Johnson, Jr.
    Jefferson LA USA

    Give a man a fish, and he eats for a day.
    Hit him with a fish, and he goes away for good!

  13. Re: What does GEM mean?

    Ron Johnson wrote:
    > On 07/27/07 11:25, Jan-Erik Söderholm wrote:
    >> John Reagan wrote:

    > [snip]
    >>> Back in the 1980s, some group inside of DEC did an
    >>> Internationalization study on VAX Pascal. They wanted the compiler to
    >>> recognize upper and lower case versions of the same "word" where the
    >>> spellings were different. For example, there are some French words
    >>> that gain or loose an accent when changing case (and sometimes only in
    >>> Quebec). There are German words like straße (5 chars long) and
    >>> STRASSE (6 chars long). They wanted the Pascal compiler to treat both
    >>> spellings as the same identifier. We passed around the report, got a
    >>> good laugh, and shoved it in a drawer (I think I still have it).
    >>>
    >>>

    >> And since then the germans has dropped the "double-s", so you'd better
    >> make a new revison anyway... :-)

    >
    > How can you just drop a letter from the alphabet?
    >
    > What happens to all the books/articles/letters/etc written prior to
    > when the letter was dropped?
    >


    OK. They changed the written standard so that two "ss" should be used
    instead of the special character. Now, there was a *lot* of fuzz
    around this, and I'm not 100% sure how it all turned out in the end.

    Jan-Erik.

  14. Re: What does GEM mean?

    On 07/27/07 16:44, Jan-Erik Söderholm wrote:
    > Ron Johnson wrote:
    >> On 07/27/07 11:25, Jan-Erik Söderholm wrote:
    >>> John Reagan wrote:

    >> [snip]
    >>>> Back in the 1980s, some group inside of DEC did an
    >>>> Internationalization study on VAX Pascal. They wanted the compiler to
    >>>> recognize upper and lower case versions of the same "word" where the
    >>>> spellings were different. For example, there are some French words
    >>>> that gain or loose an accent when changing case (and sometimes only in
    >>>> Quebec). There are German words like straße (5 chars long) and
    >>>> STRASSE (6 chars long). They wanted the Pascal compiler to treat both
    >>>> spellings as the same identifier. We passed around the report, got a
    >>>> good laugh, and shoved it in a drawer (I think I still have it).
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> And since then the germans has dropped the "double-s", so you'd better
    >>> make a new revison anyway... :-)

    >>
    >> How can you just drop a letter from the alphabet?
    >>
    >> What happens to all the books/articles/letters/etc written prior to
    >> when the letter was dropped?
    >>

    >
    > OK. They changed the written standard so that two "ss" should be used
    > instead of the special character. Now, there was a *lot* of fuzz
    > around this, and I'm not 100% sure how it all turned out in the end.


    Ah, ok. That makes more sense.

    I wish American English spelling could be rationalized, but then
    children would need to learn the Old Way and the New Way, leaving
    even less time for important things like science and recess.

    --
    Ron Johnson, Jr.
    Jefferson LA USA

    Give a man a fish, and he eats for a day.
    Hit him with a fish, and he goes away for good!

  15. Re: What does GEM mean?

    Ron Johnson wrote:
    > On 07/27/07 16:44, Jan-Erik Söderholm wrote:
    >
    >>Ron Johnson wrote:
    >>
    >>>On 07/27/07 11:25, Jan-Erik Söderholm wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>John Reagan wrote:
    >>>
    >>>[snip]
    >>>
    >>>>>Back in the 1980s, some group inside of DEC did an
    >>>>>Internationalization study on VAX Pascal. They wanted the compiler to
    >>>>>recognize upper and lower case versions of the same "word" where the
    >>>>>spellings were different. For example, there are some French words
    >>>>>that gain or loose an accent when changing case (and sometimes only in
    >>>>>Quebec). There are German words like straße (5 chars long) and
    >>>>>STRASSE (6 chars long). They wanted the Pascal compiler to treat both
    >>>>>spellings as the same identifier. We passed around the report, got a
    >>>>>good laugh, and shoved it in a drawer (I think I still have it).
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>And since then the germans has dropped the "double-s", so you'd better
    >>>>make a new revison anyway... :-)
    >>>
    >>>How can you just drop a letter from the alphabet?
    >>>
    >>>What happens to all the books/articles/letters/etc written prior to
    >>>when the letter was dropped?
    >>>

    >>
    >>OK. They changed the written standard so that two "ss" should be used
    >>instead of the special character. Now, there was a *lot* of fuzz
    >>around this, and I'm not 100% sure how it all turned out in the end.

    >
    >
    > Ah, ok. That makes more sense.
    >
    > I wish American English spelling could be rationalized, but then
    > children would need to learn the Old Way and the New Way, leaving
    > even less time for important things like science and recess.
    >


    It's been done. See http://www.rajeun.net/index4.html
    ;-)


  16. Re: What does GEM mean?

    In article ,
    Ron Johnson wrote:

    > On 07/27/07 16:44, Jan-Erik Söderholm wrote:




    > > OK. They changed the written standard so that two "ss" should be used
    > > instead of the special character. Now, there was a *lot* of fuzz
    > > around this, and I'm not 100% sure how it all turned out in the end.

    >
    > Ah, ok. That makes more sense.
    >
    > I wish American English spelling could be rationalized, but then
    > children would need to learn the Old Way and the New Way, leaving
    > even less time for important things like science and recess.


    The Netherlands produced a revised dictionary in 1954 (The Little Green
    Book), and are continuing to revise it.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_o..._changes_of_19
    46_.28Flanders.29_and_1947_.28The_Netherlands.29

    That wraps, tinyurl for that:

    http://preview.tinyurl.com/2d35lq

    --
    Paul Sture

    Sue's OpenVMS bookmarks:
    http://eisner.encompasserve.org/~stu...bookmarks.html

  17. Re: What does GEM mean?

    In article ,
    John Reagan wrote:

    > Tom Linden wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > Here is a bit of esoterica for you
    > > http://de.scientificcommons.org/20647427 click on the link (Verknüpfungen)
    > >

    >
    > Interesting. Arthur Sale's comments about Pascal where on a draft
    > standard. After that paper was published, the drafts (and eventual
    > standard) now allows underlines in identifiers.
    >
    > Back in the 1980s, some group inside of DEC did an Internationalization
    > study on VAX Pascal. They wanted the compiler to recognize upper and
    > lower case versions of the same "word" where the spellings were
    > different. For example, there are some French words that gain or loose
    > an accent when changing case (and sometimes only in Quebec). There are
    > German words like straße (5 chars long) and STRASSE (6 chars long).
    > They wanted the Pascal compiler to treat both spellings as the same
    > identifier. We passed around the report, got a good laugh, and shoved
    > it in a drawer (I think I still have it).


    An interesting story thanks. On a similar theme, in German it is
    accepted practice to use an "e" after the vowel instead of the umlaut
    for representation in block capitals, data entry - ae, oe, ue instead of
    ä, ö, ü. This also applies to e-mail and website addresses to get around
    keyboard, font and 7-bit limitations.

    Some database search engines such as address lookups match on either
    form, others don't. Out of interest, does anyone know how a match on
    either form is done?

    --
    Paul Sture

    Sue's OpenVMS bookmarks:
    http://eisner.encompasserve.org/~stu...bookmarks.html

  18. Re: What does GEM mean?

    In article ,
    John Reagan wrote:

    > John Reagan wrote:
    >
    > > German words like straße (5 chars long) and STRASSE (6 chars long).

    >
    > and to compound the problem, I can't count. :-)


    And why would a compiler author need to? :-)

    --
    Paul Sture

    Sue's OpenVMS bookmarks:
    http://eisner.encompasserve.org/~stu...bookmarks.html

  19. Re: What does GEM mean?

    P. Sture wrote:
    > In article ,
    > John Reagan wrote:
    >
    >
    >>John Reagan wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>German words like straße (5 chars long) and STRASSE (6 chars long).

    >>
    >>and to compound the problem, I can't count. :-)

    >
    >
    > And why would a compiler author need to? :-)
    >


    Indeed! That's what computers are for! If God had meant us to count
    above twenty he would have given us more digits! ;-)


  20. Re: What does GEM mean?

    Jan-Erik Söderholm wrote:

    > And since then the germans has dropped the "double-s", so you'd better
    > make a new revison anyway... :-)


    We didn't drop the "ß". The new rules for orthography just uses the "ß"
    letter infrequently then before.

    Regards
    Götz
    --
    http://www.knubbelmac.de/

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