Re: ssh hostkey file location - VMS

This is a discussion on Re: ssh hostkey file location - VMS ; From: Anton Shterenlikht > How can I find the SSH2 hostkey of a VMS node, i.e. the one that is being > copied to known_hosts when you first connect? SYS$MANAGER:TCPIP$SSH_RUN.COM suggests tcpip$ssh_device:[tcpip$ssh]. I suspect that the SSH manual would also ...

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Thread: Re: ssh hostkey file location

  1. Re: ssh hostkey file location

    From: Anton Shterenlikht

    > How can I find the SSH2 hostkey of a VMS node, i.e. the one that is being
    > copied to known_hosts when you first connect?


    SYS$MANAGER:TCPIP$SSH_RUN.COM suggests tcpip$ssh_device:[tcpip$ssh].

    I suspect that the SSH manual would also mention it.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Steven M. Schweda sms@antinode.org
    382 South Warwick Street (+1) 651-699-9818
    Saint Paul MN 55105-2547

  2. Re: ssh hostkey file location

    On Mon, Apr 28, 2008 at 08:41:49AM -0500, Steven M. Schweda wrote:
    > From: Anton Shterenlikht
    >
    > > How can I find the SSH2 hostkey of a VMS node, i.e. the one that is being
    > > copied to known_hosts when you first connect?

    >
    > SYS$MANAGER:TCPIP$SSH_RUN.COM suggests tcpip$ssh_device:[tcpip$ssh].
    >
    > I suspect that the SSH manual would also mention it.


    Steven, thank you, found it.

    I think I was misled by M.D.Duffy "Getting Started with OpenVMS,
    A Guide for New Users", Digital Press 2003, who gives the following
    examples on p. 88 in section Wildcards for Directory Operations

    "To search all directories on the disk for any files
    called ERROR.LOG:

    $ DIRECTORY [*...]ERROR.LOG ! Excludes MFD
    $ DIRECTORY [000000...]ERROR.LOG ! Includes MFD"

    So I presumed that $DIRECTORY [*...]hostskey*.*,
    would search all of the disk, but it didn't.
    I have to do $DIRECTORY sys$sysdevice:[*...]hostkey*.* instead.

    I guess "*" in directory operations means "any subdirectory
    immediately below the default directory"?

    Also, I cannot find any ssh manual at hp.com/go/openvms/doc
    and HELP SSH is very limited.
    What ssh manual did you mean?

    thanks
    anton

    --
    Anton Shterenlikht
    Room 2.6, Queen's Building
    Mech Eng Dept
    Bristol University
    University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TR, UK
    Tel: +44 (0)117 928 8233
    Fax: +44 (0)117 929 4423

  3. Re: ssh hostkey file location

    On Mon, 28 Apr 2008, Anton Shterenlikht wrote:

    > On Mon, Apr 28, 2008 at 08:41:49AM -0500, Steven M. Schweda wrote:
    >> From: Anton Shterenlikht
    >>
    >>> How can I find the SSH2 hostkey of a VMS node, i.e. the one that
    >>> is being copied to known_hosts when you first connect?

    >>
    >> SYS$MANAGER:TCPIP$SSH_RUN.COM suggests
    >> tcpip$ssh_device:[tcpip$ssh].
    >>
    >> I suspect that the SSH manual would also mention it.

    >
    > Steven, thank you, found it.
    >
    > I think I was misled by M.D.Duffy "Getting Started with OpenVMS, A
    > Guide for New Users", Digital Press 2003, who gives the following
    > examples on p. 88 in section Wildcards for Directory Operations
    >
    > "To search all directories on the disk for any files
    > called ERROR.LOG:
    >
    > $ DIRECTORY [*...]ERROR.LOG ! Excludes MFD
    > $ DIRECTORY [000000...]ERROR.LOG ! Includes MFD"
    >
    > So I presumed that $DIRECTORY [*...]hostskey*.*,
    > would search all of the disk, but it didn't.
    > I have to do $DIRECTORY sys$sysdevice:[*...]hostkey*.* instead.


    The difference between "[*...]hostskey*.*", and
    "sys$sysdevice:[*...]hostkey*.*" is that the latter specifies a device
    name and the former does not.

    Do you have more than one disk drive and your default device was not
    SYS$SYSDEVICE? Type SHOW DEFAULT. Then type SHOW LOGICAL
    SYS$SYSDEVICE.

    Or were you logged into an account who's default device was a rooted
    logical, such as SYSTEM? (Duffy's target audience was probably not
    "new users who are logged in as SYSTEM". ;-) ) When a rooted logical
    is used as the device specifier, file system searches do not extend
    beyond the domain of the rooted logical.

    > I guess "*" in directory operations means "any subdirectory
    > immediately below the default directory"?


    No that's what "[.*" means. "[*" really does search the entire
    device, but either of the two explanations above can explain your
    results.

    If you are coming from a UNIX-like background where all disk drives
    are hidden from the user and the entire directory tree is under "/",
    you will find this part of VMS different. On VMS each disk drive is
    presented to the user separately, as they are in popular Microsoft
    operating systems. On UNIX, you can search all disk drives for a file
    with a single command. On VMS, you must repeat the command for each
    disk drive.

    hth

    - Rob


    --

    Rob Brown b r o w n a t g m c l d o t c o m
    G. Michaels Consulting Ltd. (780)438-9343 (voice)
    Edmonton (780)437-3367 (FAX)
    http://gmcl.com/


  4. Re: ssh hostkey file location

    Rob Brown wrote:

    > On UNIX, you can search all disk drives for a file
    > with a single command. On VMS, you must repeat the command for each
    > disk drive.


    Or create a logical name that is a search-path to all disks
    and use a single command...

    Jan-Erik.

  5. Re: ssh hostkey file location

    In article <20080428152528.GA87716@mech-aslap33.men.bris.ac.uk>, Anton Shterenlikht writes:
    > I guess "*" in directory operations means "any subdirectory
    > immediately below the default directory"?


    No. * in [*...] means all top level directories except the MFD
    on the current device, all all thier subdirectories.

    If a logical name is used to create a rooted device it acts like
    a real device in this manner, it even will simulate the MFD if
    you specify [000000].

    If your default directory is not at the top of a real or rooted
    device then [*...] will pack up directory levels closer to the MFD
    than your current default.


  6. Re: ssh hostkey file location

    On Mon, Apr 28, 2008 at 04:30:00PM +0000, Rob Brown wrote:
    > On Mon, 28 Apr 2008, Anton Shterenlikht wrote:
    >
    > >On Mon, Apr 28, 2008 at 08:41:49AM -0500, Steven M. Schweda wrote:
    > >>From: Anton Shterenlikht
    > >>
    > >>>How can I find the SSH2 hostkey of a VMS node, i.e. the one that
    > >>>is being copied to known_hosts when you first connect?

    >
    > Or were you logged into an account who's default device was a rooted
    > logical, such as SYSTEM? (Duffy's target audience was probably not
    > "new users who are logged in as SYSTEM". ;-) ) When a rooted logical
    > is used as the device specifier, file system searches do not extend
    > beyond the domain of the rooted logical.


    Oh.. I didn't know this. This is my case indeed. I'm logged in as
    SYSTEM and the mentioned logicals are:

    $ show logical sys$sysdevice
    "SYS$SYSDEVICE" = "$1$DGA1:" (LNM$SYSTEM_TABLE)
    $ show logical sys$sysroot
    "SYS$SYSROOT" = "$1$DGA1:[SYS1.]" (LNM$SYSTEM_TABLE)
    = "SYS$COMMON:"
    1 "SYS$COMMON" = "$1$DGA1:[SYS1.SYSCOMMON.]" (LNM$SYSTEM_TABLE)
    $

    many thanks

    --
    Anton Shterenlikht
    Room 2.6, Queen's Building
    Mech Eng Dept
    Bristol University
    University Walk, Bristol BS8 1TR, UK
    Tel: +44 (0)117 928 8233
    Fax: +44 (0)117 929 4423

  7. Re: ssh hostkey file location

    In article <20080429083857.GA99498@mech-aslap33.men.bris.ac.uk>, Anton Shterenlikht writes:
    >
    > $ show logical sys$sysdevice
    > "SYS$SYSDEVICE" = "$1$DGA1:" (LNM$SYSTEM_TABLE)
    > $ show logical sys$sysroot
    > "SYS$SYSROOT" = "$1$DGA1:[SYS1.]" (LNM$SYSTEM_TABLE)
    > = "SYS$COMMON:"
    > 1 "SYS$COMMON" = "$1$DGA1:[SYS1.SYSCOMMON.]" (LNM$SYSTEM_TABLE)
    > $


    sys$common sets up a rooted device. So for most purposes
    sys$common:[sys1.syscommon] acts like [000000] on a real
    disk.

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