Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86 - VMS

This is a discussion on Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86 - VMS ; Main, Kerry wrote: > http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/pr...4/040324a.html > HP awarded $784 Million Services Contract by Department of Veteran Affairs If the bets you can find are 4 year old announcements, then it is a further sign of the decline in VMS business....

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Thread: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

  1. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    Main, Kerry wrote:

    > http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/pr...4/040324a.html
    > HP awarded $784 Million Services Contract by Department of Veteran Affairs



    If the bets you can find are 4 year old announcements, then it is a
    further sign of the decline in VMS business.


  2. RE: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: JF Mezei [mailto:jfmezei.spamnot@vaxination.ca]
    > Sent: April 22, 2008 6:15 PM
    > To: Info-VAX@Mvb.Saic.Com
    > Subject: Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86
    >
    > Main, Kerry wrote:
    >
    > > http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/pr...4/040324a.html
    > > HP awarded $784 Million Services Contract by Department of Veteran

    > Affairs
    >
    >
    > If the bets you can find are 4 year old announcements, then it is a
    > further sign of the decline in VMS business.


    Had nothing to do with what you are insinuating.

    Bill referenced the VA and I simply pointed out a major area of VA
    (and in most companies, $784M is a pretty big deal) he was obviously
    not plugged into.


    Regards

    Kerry Main
    Senior Consultant
    HP Services Canada
    Voice: 613-254-8911
    Fax: 613-591-4477
    kerryDOTmainAThpDOTcom
    (remove the DOT's and AT)

    OpenVMS - the secure, multi-site OS that just works.




  3. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    In article <0A7046B0A95F2B41B3712F0C5FD1CDC303BCD2@ex-tg2-pr.corporate.transgrid.local>,
    "O'Brien Paddy" writes:
    > This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
    >
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    > Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
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    >
    > -----Original Message-----
    > From: Tad Winters [mailto:stafford.no.spam.winters2@verizon.net]
    > Sent: Tue 4/22/2008 3:41 PM
    > To: Info-VAX@Mvb.Saic.Com
    > Subject: Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86
    > =20
    > This all reminds me of Microsoft's end-user license agreement. Here=20
    > are a couple paragraphs:
    >
    > 22. DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES. The Limited=20
    > Warranty that appears above is the only=20
    > express warranty made to you and is provided=20
    > in lieu of any other express warranties or=20
    > similar obligations (if any) created by any=20
    > advertising, documentation, packaging, or=20
    > other communications. Except for the Limited=20
    > Warranty and to the maximum extent permitted=20
    > by applicable law, Manufacturer and its=20
    > suppliers (including MS, Microsoft=20
    > Corporation (including its subsidiaries) and=20
    > their respective suppliers) provide the=20
    > SOFTWARE and support services (if any) AS IS=20
    > AND WITH ALL FAULTS, and hereby disclaim all=20
    > other warranties and conditions, whether=20
    > express, implied or statutory, including, but=20
    > not limited to, any (if any) implied=20
    > warranties, duties or conditions of=20
    > merchantability, of fitness for a particular=20
    > purpose, of reliability or availability, of=20
    > accuracy or completeness of responses, of=20
    > results, of workmanlike effort, of lack of=20
    > viruses, and of lack of negligence, all with=20
    > regard to the SOFTWARE, and the provision of=20
    > or failure to provide support or other=20
    > services, information, software, and related=20
    > content through the SOFTWARE or otherwise=20
    > arising out of the use of the SOFTWARE. ALSO,=20
    > THERE IS NO WARRANTY OR CONDITION OF TITLE,=20
    > QUIET ENJOYMENT, QUIET POSSESSION,=20
    > CORRESPONDENCE TO DESCRIPTION OR NON-
    > INFRINGEMENT WITH REGARD TO THE SOFTWARE.
    > =20
    > 23. EXCLUSION OF INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL=20
    > AND CERTAIN OTHER DAMAGES. TO THE MAXIMUM=20
    > EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, IN NO=20
    > EVENT SHALL MANUFACTURER OR ITS SUPPLIERS=20
    > (INCLUDING MS, MICROSOFT CORPORATION,=20
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    > RESPECTIVE SUPPLIERS) BE LIABLE FOR ANY=20
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    > THE FAULT, TORT (INCLUDING NEGLIGENCE),=20
    > MISREPRESENTATION, STRICT LIABILITY, BREACH=20
    > OF CONTRACT OR BREACH OF WARRANTY OF=20
    > MANUFACTURER OR ANY SUPPLIER (INCLUDING MS,=20
    > MICROSOFT CORPORATION (INCLUDING ITS=20
    > SUBSIDIARIES) AND THEIR RESPECTIVE SUPPLIERS),
    > AND EVEN IF MANUFACTURER OR ANY SUPPLIER=20
    > (INCLUDING MS, MICROSOFT CORPORATION=20
    > (INCLUDING ITS SUBSIDIARIES) AND THEIR=20
    > RESPECTIVE SUPPLIERS) HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE=20
    > POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.
    >
    >
    > I hope this comes over correctly --- I am forced onto this stupid microshaf=
    > t stuff. If not, I apologise, and is why I do not now write here much. An=
    > d I cannot use internal Outlook mail, I only have access from my VMS (genuf=
    > lection) box to the very frustrating Outlook Web Access.
    >
    > In reply to Tad: -- since I never have and never will buy anything from mic=
    > roshaft, I have never read Herr (a quick goose-step) Ballmer's licence. Th=
    > anks for the enlightenment.
    >
    > With this sort of licence agreement, why are large companies and government=
    > s agreeing to such restrictions or exceptions? Thankfully I have seen repo=
    > rts that several governments are dishing this most "crapfull" (not a word, =
    > I do know) OS. O.K., the home user is probably not too worried as he/she i=
    > s not usually doing too much other than reading email, playing solitaire an=
    > d letting themselves become a zombie. But companies and organisations ... =
    > ??
    >
    > Yes, Bill, I know, but how many of them do tie down their (not "there" -- a=
    > nd I haven't used "you're", so not "your" -- this is general, not specifica=
    > lly to you Mr. Gunshannon) systems? I know of several organisations that d=
    > o not.


    I guess when you can't really attack the message you just attack the
    spelling. :-) I have never considered News important enough to
    spend hours proofreading the text. And we won't get into all that
    HTML crap that made up more than half of this posting before I trimmed
    it.

    >
    > Regards, Paddy


    So how is the above disclaimer any sillier or more insidiuous than the
    one below? This is USENET News, not Email and the message was posted
    indiscriminately to thousand upon thousand of systems for viewing by
    potentially millions of people.

    I doubt many (if any) people ever bother to read either of these
    disclaimers.

    As for people "tieing down" their systems, the question has never
    been do people do it but rather can it be done. Many people here
    have repeatedly claimed it was not possible. I have, in return,
    repeatedly pointed out that it was possible and that there are
    people and organizations doing it and that the information needed
    to do it is publicly available.o

    bill

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    > If you have received the email in error, please notify TransGrid=20
    > immediately. Any views expressed in this email are those of the=20
    > individual sender except where the sender expressly and with=20
    > authority states them to be the views of TransGrid. TransGrid uses
    > virus-scanning software but excludes any liability for viruses
    > contained in any attachment."
    >
    > ************************************************** *********************
    >


    --
    Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    billg999@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    University of Scranton |
    Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include

  4. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    In article <480de2f7$0$11639$607ed4bc@cv.net>,
    VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG writes:
    >
    >>Yes, Bill, I know, but how many of them do tie down their (not "there" -- a=
    >>nd I haven't used "you're", so not "your" -- this is general, not specifica=
    >>lly to you Mr. Gunshannon) systems? I know of several organisations that d=
    >>o not.

    >
    > I hear the grammar police sirens wailing.


    Wen I have been in Germany I have frequently been known to get my
    Der/Die/Das wrong, even after living there and taking 4 years of
    College level German. I have never found a German who would correct
    me, even if I requested it. I have always found it interesting
    how English speakers find it so necessary. (Oblig. Anecdote: I was
    eating breakfast in a Perkins Restaurant in Gettysburg, PA. back in
    March. Two tables from me a man and two women were eating together
    and chatting. One of the women was continually interupting the
    conversation of the others to correct their grammar. Go figure!!)

    bill

    --
    Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    billg999@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    University of Scranton |
    Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include

  5. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    In article ,
    John Reagan writes:
    > Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >
    >
    >> A few years ago is right. Fielded in 1991, approved for production in 1996,
    >> last system delivered in 2005. A total of 8 systems.
    >> There is much more information about the airframe than anything else and
    >> no mention of VMS at all. I wonder if it has been ported to Windows yet?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > A NG employee gave a keynote address at last year's OpenVMS Technical
    > Bootcamp on JSTARS. The non-disclosure prevents me from giving details
    > from the talk (which itself was very high level) plus I'd probably
    > remember incorrectly anyway.


    Ah yes, the typical VMS in DOD response. I would tell you but then I would
    have to kill you.

    bill

    --
    Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    billg999@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    University of Scranton |
    Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include

  6. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    In article ,
    "Main, Kerry" writes:
    >> -----Original Message-----
    >> From: JF Mezei [mailto:jfmezei.spamnot@vaxination.ca]
    >> Sent: April 22, 2008 6:15 PM
    >> To: Info-VAX@Mvb.Saic.Com
    >> Subject: Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86
    >>
    >> Main, Kerry wrote:
    >>
    >> > http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/pr...4/040324a.html
    >> > HP awarded $784 Million Services Contract by Department of Veteran

    >> Affairs
    >>
    >>
    >> If the bets you can find are 4 year old announcements, then it is a
    >> further sign of the decline in VMS business.

    >
    > Had nothing to do with what you are insinuating.
    >
    > Bill referenced the VA and I simply pointed out a major area of VA
    > (and in most companies, $784M is a pretty big deal) he was obviously
    > not plugged into.


    Ummmm.... I have never mentioned the VA. And I don't know for sure,
    but I don't think they come under the DOD which is what I was talking
    about. I know that the VA still uses VMS, but I also know people who
    are involved in the IT infrastructure at the VA and they are seeing
    a strong move toward Windows so, like Cerner, VMS may not have this
    much longer either.

    Ignoring for the moment the fact that this is 4 year old news, I
    am not so sure that $784M over 10 years is that big a deal for an
    oganization the size of the Department of Veteran's Affairs.
    Proposed budget for 2009 is $93.7 Billion.

    bill

    --
    Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    billg999@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    University of Scranton |
    Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include

  7. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    Bill Gunshannon wrote:

    > Ah yes, the typical VMS in DOD response. I would tell you but then I would
    > have to kill you.


    If that were true, there would be plenty of pressure by C.O.V. members
    to get those DOD folks to tell me a lot :-)

    Heck, even HP might put pressure on DOD to come to vist me, tell me a
    lot and do whatever they have to do after they have told a lot :-)

  8. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    > In article <480de2f7$0$11639$607ed4bc@cv.net>,
    > VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG writes:
    >>> Yes, Bill, I know, but how many of them do tie down their (not "there" -- a=
    >>> nd I haven't used "you're", so not "your" -- this is general, not specifica=
    >>> lly to you Mr. Gunshannon) systems? I know of several organisations that d=
    >>> o not.

    >> I hear the grammar police sirens wailing.

    >
    > Wen I have been in Germany I have frequently been known to get my
    > Der/Die/Das wrong, even after living there and taking 4 years of
    > College level German. I have never found a German who would correct
    > me, even if I requested it. I have always found it interesting
    > how English speakers find it so necessary. (Oblig. Anecdote: I was
    > eating breakfast in a Perkins Restaurant in Gettysburg, PA. back in
    > March. Two tables from me a man and two women were eating together
    > and chatting. One of the women was continually interupting the
    > conversation of the others to correct their grammar. Go figure!!)
    >


    Der, die, und das are merely the definite article in three different
    "genders": masculine, feminine and neuter. None of these genders really
    contribute anything useful to the language.

    English has a few such "hangovers". For example, a ship is always
    "feminine"; in German "die schiff". ("A little boat can be anything you
    please but a full rigged ship's a lady!") For the most part, inanimate
    objects are neuter in English. There is no logic in which German nouns
    are masculine, feminine, or neuter; it's rote memorization all the way!

    English, as we now know it, resulted from the efforts of Norman soldiers
    to make time with Anglo-Saxon girls. Many of the grammatical
    "niceties", in both languages, were simply abandoned.

    Anyone who was ever stationed in Japan for any significant amount of
    time is probably familiar with "GI Japanese" a sort of pidgin
    constructed from words drawn from both languages. Sometimes the words
    got a little mangled. English as we now know it, developed in a
    similar manner.

  9. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    JF Mezei wrote:
    > Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >
    >> Ah yes, the typical VMS in DOD response. I would tell you but then I would
    >> have to kill you.

    >
    > If that were true, there would be plenty of pressure by C.O.V. members
    > to get those DOD folks to tell me a lot :-)
    >
    > Heck, even HP might put pressure on DOD to come to vist me, tell me a
    > lot and do whatever they have to do after they have told a lot :-)


    JF has solved the problem of JF brilliantly! Come on DOD!

  10. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 19:27:21 -0700, Richard B. Gilbert
    wrote:

    > Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >> In article <480de2f7$0$11639$607ed4bc@cv.net>,
    >> VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG writes:
    >>>> Yes, Bill, I know, but how many of them do tie down their (not
    >>>> "there" -- a=
    >>>> nd I haven't used "you're", so not "your" -- this is general, not
    >>>> specifica=
    >>>> lly to you Mr. Gunshannon) systems? I know of several organisations
    >>>> that d=
    >>>> o not.
    >>> I hear the grammar police sirens wailing.

    >> Wen I have been in Germany I have frequently been known to get my
    >> Der/Die/Das wrong, even after living there and taking 4 years of
    >> College level German. I have never found a German who would correct
    >> me, even if I requested it. I have always found it interesting
    >> how English speakers find it so necessary. (Oblig. Anecdote: I was
    >> eating breakfast in a Perkins Restaurant in Gettysburg, PA. back in
    >> March. Two tables from me a man and two women were eating together
    >> and chatting. One of the women was continually interupting the
    >> conversation of the others to correct their grammar. Go figure!!)
    >>

    >
    > Der, die, und das are merely the definite article in three different
    > "genders": masculine, feminine and neuter. None of these genders really
    > contribute anything useful to the language.


    depends upon your testosterone level, a car is der Wagen, die Maschine
    oder das
    Auto.


    >
    > English has a few such "hangovers". For example, a ship is always
    > "feminine"; in German "die schiff". ("A little boat can be anything you
    > please but a full rigged ship's a lady!") For the most part, inanimate
    > objects are neuter in English. There is no logic in which German nouns
    > are masculine, feminine, or neuter; it's rote memorization all the way!
    >


    das Schiff, bitte.

    > English, as we now know it, resulted from the efforts of Norman soldiers
    > to make time with Anglo-Saxon girls. Many of the grammatical
    > "niceties", in both languages, were simply abandoned.
    >
    > Anyone who was ever stationed in Japan for any significant amount of
    > time is probably familiar with "GI Japanese" a sort of pidgin
    > constructed from words drawn from both languages. Sometimes the words
    > got a little mangled. English as we now know it, developed in a
    > similar manner.




    --
    PL/I for OpenVMS
    www.kednos.com

  11. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    Tom Linden wrote:
    > On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 19:27:21 -0700, Richard B. Gilbert
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >>> In article <480de2f7$0$11639$607ed4bc@cv.net>,
    >>> VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG writes:
    >>>>> Yes, Bill, I know, but how many of them do tie down their (not
    >>>>> "there" -- a=
    >>>>> nd I haven't used "you're", so not "your" -- this is general, not
    >>>>> specifica=
    >>>>> lly to you Mr. Gunshannon) systems? I know of several
    >>>>> organisations that d=
    >>>>> o not.
    >>>> I hear the grammar police sirens wailing.
    >>> Wen I have been in Germany I have frequently been known to get my
    >>> Der/Die/Das wrong, even after living there and taking 4 years of
    >>> College level German. I have never found a German who would correct
    >>> me, even if I requested it. I have always found it interesting
    >>> how English speakers find it so necessary. (Oblig. Anecdote: I was
    >>> eating breakfast in a Perkins Restaurant in Gettysburg, PA. back in
    >>> March. Two tables from me a man and two women were eating together
    >>> and chatting. One of the women was continually interupting the
    >>> conversation of the others to correct their grammar. Go figure!!)
    >>>

    >>
    >> Der, die, und das are merely the definite article in three different
    >> "genders": masculine, feminine and neuter. None of these genders
    >> really contribute anything useful to the language.

    >
    > depends upon your testosterone level, a car is der Wagen, die Maschine
    > oder das
    > Auto.
    >
    >
    >>
    >> English has a few such "hangovers". For example, a ship is always
    >> "feminine"; in German "die schiff". ("A little boat can be anything
    >> you please but a full rigged ship's a lady!") For the most part,
    >> inanimate objects are neuter in English. There is no logic in which
    >> German nouns are masculine, feminine, or neuter; it's rote
    >> memorization all the way!
    >>

    >
    > das Schiff, bitte.
    >

    Nein! Die schiff is correct. But das boat! At least that's the way
    it was taught 50 years ago. My teacher was a native speaker.


  12. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
    > Tom Linden wrote:
    >> On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 19:27:21 -0700, Richard B. Gilbert
    >> wrote:


    >> das Schiff, bitte.
    >>

    > Nein! Die schiff is correct. But das boat! At least that's the way
    > it was taught 50 years ago. My teacher was a native speaker.
    >


    As a native speaker ...
    Tom is right: das Schiff, das Boot.
    Funny enough, individual named ships are almost always female:
    die Titanic, die QMII, die Gorch Fock...

    [And with Titanic, we are almost on topic]

    --

    Joseph Huber - http://www.huber-joseph.de

  13. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    Joseph Huber wrote:
    > Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
    >> Tom Linden wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 22 Apr 2008 19:27:21 -0700, Richard B. Gilbert
    >>> wrote:

    >
    >>> das Schiff, bitte.
    >>>

    >> Nein! Die schiff is correct. But das boat! At least that's the way
    >> it was taught 50 years ago. My teacher was a native speaker.
    >>

    >
    > As a native speaker ...
    > Tom is right: das Schiff, das Boot.
    > Funny enough, individual named ships are almost always female:
    > die Titanic, die QMII, die Gorch Fock...
    >
    > [And with Titanic, we are almost on topic]
    >


    May the Itanic sink with you aboard! Now we're more on topic!

  14. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    In article <677i8hF2k0pq2U2@mid.individual.net>, billg999@cs.uofs.edu (Bill Gunshannon) writes:
    >In article <480de2f7$0$11639$607ed4bc@cv.net>,
    > VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG writes:
    >>
    >>>Yes, Bill, I know, but how many of them do tie down their (not "there" -- a=
    >>>nd I haven't used "you're", so not "your" -- this is general, not specifica=
    >>>lly to you Mr. Gunshannon) systems? I know of several organisations that d=
    >>>o not.

    >>
    >> I hear the grammar police sirens wailing.

    >
    >Wen I have been in Germany I have frequently been known to get my
    >Der/Die/Das wrong, even after living there and taking 4 years of
    >College level German. I have never found a German who would correct
    >me, even if I requested it. I have always found it interesting
    >how English speakers find it so necessary. (Oblig. Anecdote: I was
    >eating breakfast in a Perkins Restaurant in Gettysburg, PA. back in
    >March. Two tables from me a man and two women were eating together
    >and chatting. One of the women was continually interupting the
    >conversation of the others to correct their grammar. Go figure!!)


    You travelled all the way to Gettysburg for a Perkins breakfast? None
    up in Scranton area? You went to the wrong place for brekkie man. The
    Classic Diner on Lancaster Ave in Frazer is the place to go.

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    http://tmesis.com/drat.html

  15. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    someone wrote:

    >>> http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/pr...4/040324a.html
    >>> HP awarded $784 Million Services Contract by Department of Veteran Affairs



    OK, I stand somewhat corrected. This is a 10 year deal. So there are 6
    more years left to this particular deal.

    However,if someome trying to point at how healthy a product is, can only
    point to 4 year old press releases, it generally means that there hasn't
    been much success since then and that the product is just riding on
    existing contracts without much new business.

    I wonder if that deal provides for Alpha system upgrades/additions
    throughout the life of the contract.

  16. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    In article <480e6391$0$7289$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com>, JF Mezei writes:
    > Main, Kerry wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.hp.com/hpinfo/newsroom/pr...4/040324a.html
    >> HP awarded $784 Million Services Contract by Department of Veteran Affairs

    >
    >
    > If the bets you can find are 4 year old announcements, then it is a
    > further sign of the decline in VMS business.
    >


    Because those VMS machines just keep running. No need to replace a
    system that's only 4 years old.

    Wish my tax dollars went towrd more systems like that.


  17. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    In article , "Tom Linden" writes:
    >
    > depends upon your testosterone level, a car is der Wagen, die Maschine =
    >
    > oder das
    > Auto.


    But only in German is a teenage girl neuter.


  18. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    Bill Gunshannon wrote:

    >
    >
    > Ah yes, the typical VMS in DOD response. I would tell you but then I would
    > have to kill you.
    >
    > bill
    >


    I meant the regular Bootcamp non-disclosure, not any extra NG or DOD
    non-disclosure. Given that there were non-US citizens in the room and
    the hotel is not sure, there was nothing of real DOD level secrecy in
    the presentation. There was discussion of JSTARS and where OpenVMS
    plays a part.

    --
    John Reagan
    OpenVMS Pascal/Macro-32/COBOL Project Leader
    Hewlett-Packard Company

  19. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86

    John Reagan wrote:

    > the presentation. There was discussion of JSTARS and where OpenVMS
    > plays a part.


    Not asking stuff specific to JSTARs: Are there any concerns about hard
    disk drives being used in aircraft, especially military ones that may be
    called to make "interesting "manoeuvers that create a couple of Gs or go
    through turbulence etc ?

    Modern aircraft now have large storage arrays for the in-flight
    entertainment systems and I suspect they would have to deal with the
    same issues.

  20. Re: Intel Itanium RAS Comparison with X86


    "John Reagan" wrote in message
    news:fukt68$jic$1@usenet01.boi.hp.com...
    > Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >
    >
    >> A few years ago is right. Fielded in 1991, approved for production in
    >> 1996,
    >> last system delivered in 2005. A total of 8 systems. There is much more
    >> information about the airframe than anything else and
    >> no mention of VMS at all. I wonder if it has been ported to Windows yet?
    >>
    >>

    >
    > A NG employee gave a keynote address at last year's OpenVMS Technical
    > Bootcamp on JSTARS. The non-disclosure prevents me from giving details
    > from the talk (which itself was very high level) plus I'd probably
    > remember incorrectly anyway.
    >


    JSTARS has been running on VMS since 1991 and the prototype plane was called
    into service during Gulf War I - if you remember the prop behind Gen
    Swartzcropf in the "mother of all retreats" - that was from JSTARS.

    Originally on VAX and ruggedized DEC3000 (Flamingo) systems, it migrated to
    modified AlphaServer ES40s (form factor modification and power supply).
    Each aircraft (Boeing 707s) contains 20 ES40s. There are 17 production
    aircraft plus backups and test. Plus training and ground stations.

    http://www.airforce-technology.com/projects/jstars/

    Provides a high level overview of the E8. As will a Google search on
    "Northrop Grumman JSTARS"

    JSTARS remains an active and evolving program.

    All of the above can be gleaned from public materials.




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