Longtime VMS system manager/programmer available - VMS

This is a discussion on Longtime VMS system manager/programmer available - VMS ; koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) wrote in news kf0ojR$LBwM@eisner.encompasserve.org: > It's not unheard of for the author of any piece of code not to > realize the unintentional consequences of some piece. The one > time I had to file an SPR ...

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Thread: Longtime VMS system manager/programmer available

  1. Re: Longtime VMS system manager/programmer available

    koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) wrote in
    newskf0ojR$LBwM@eisner.encompasserve.org:

    > It's not unheard of for the author of any piece of code not to
    > realize the unintentional consequences of some piece. The one
    > time I had to file an SPR against a VAX Fortran compiler part of
    > the response was that I'd gone down a path that was thought to be
    > unreachable.


    Surely BLISS has too many reachable paths!

    I could never decide whether the Alpha BLISS MACROS for (iirc) ADDM and
    friends were the product of genius or a deranged mind :-)

    Antonio

  2. Re: Longtime VMS system manager/programmer available

    JF Mezei wrote:
    > Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >> And I would say that C is a language where the difference between
    >> good and bad programmers really show !

    >
    > At the time C was relatively new outside of unix, it was said that
    > assembler programmers were old enough to remember the absolute need to
    > write efficient code in a very small memory footprint.


    My point was about robustness not efficiency.

    > Today, C programmers are the ones who are old enough to know to make
    > efficient programs without bloated structures and giganourmous memory
    > and CPU requirements. It the younger generation who grew up on C++,
    > perl, php, all the visual microsoft crap who now are so far detached
    > from the machines that they write bloated inefficient code and they have
    > no experience in needing to write efficient code since they just buy
    > more memory and faster CPU when their app needs it.


    Usually that is more cost efficient.

    Arne

  3. Re: Longtime VMS system manager/programmer available

    Tom Linden wrote:
    > On Sat, 12 Apr 2008 20:59:19 -0700, Arne Vajhøj wrote:
    >> I am not a driver person. Far from. But as I understand it then there
    >> are quite a few things you can not do in a driver and there are
    >> documentation for C about what you can use of C without breaking
    >> any of the rules. Does similar documentation exist in the PL/I
    >> documentation or in the VMS documentation or in a book for PL/I ?
    >>
    >> Even if the docs does not exist then you may still be able to
    >> write a driver in PL/I because you know what it does, but that
    >> does not cut it as supported.

    >
    > If there is a SDL description of the interface, then it should be easy,
    > otherwise translating a C prototype to PL/I is trivial.


    I don't think writing a driver is so much a matter of using or
    providing an API.

    Arne

  4. Re: Longtime VMS system manager/programmer available

    Main, Kerry wrote:
    > From: AEF [mailto:spamsink2001@yahoo.com]
    >> On Apr 14, 11:14 pm, JF Mezei wrote:
    >>> Today, C programmers are the ones who are old enough to know to make
    >>> efficient programs without bloated structures and giganourmous memory
    >>> and CPU requirements. It the younger generation who grew up on C++,
    >>> perl, php, all the visual microsoft crap who now are so far detached
    >>> from the machines that they write bloated inefficient code and they have
    >>> no experience in needing to write efficient code since they just buy
    >>> more memory and faster CPU when their app needs it.

    >> Say what? Since when has this made things run acceptably fast?

    >
    > This is especially true these days with the advancement of multi-core
    > cpu's. Applications not written with the concept of threads, SMP,
    > job scheduling etc will have problems with performance no matter how
    > many additional CPU's you throw at the solution.


    But it is so much easier to write the multithreaded apps in some
    of the newer languages than in C ...

    Arne

  5. Re: Longtime VMS system manager/programmer available

    On Sat, 26 Apr 2008 19:32:10 -0700, Arne Vajhøj wrote:

    > If there is a SDL description of the interface, then it should be easy,
    > otherwise translating a C prototype to PL/I is trivial.
    > I don't think writing a driver is so much a matter of using or
    > providing an API.
    >

    I am not sure what you mean.


    --
    PL/I for OpenVMS
    www.kednos.com

  6. Re: Longtime VMS system manager/programmer available

    On Apr 2, 3:15*pm, Galen wrote:
    > My current position is in the process of drying up. I have good
    > prospects of other employment within my company (Booz Allen Hamilton)
    > but none that involve VMS.
    >
    > I've been working with VMS since 1983 and with DEC->Compaq->HP
    > hardware and software since my college days (1976-1980). I have done a
    > bit of driver-level code in the past, but most recently have been
    > doing VMS system support and small scale C programming.
    >
    > Given the right opportunity I'd consider relocating, perhaps
    > especially to the San Francisco Bay Area, but staying in Northern
    > Virginia would suit me and my family better.
    >
    > If you'd like a resume or more information you can reach me at
    > gltmailbox-vms .at. yahoo dot com.


    Hi,

    I have a contract job in Woodland Hills, CA for 6-9+ months needing
    following:

    Client has purchased Itanium OpenVMS equipment and we have an
    opportunity to provide application migration services from VMS to
    Itanium OpenVMS.

    We are looking for an application migration porting consultant who has
    hands on experience migrating from VMS to Itanium OpenVMS hardware.
    The applications being migrated were originally written in Cobol and
    Digital Basic. Knowledge of this code is nice to have but no actual
    coding will be done.

    Tasks:

    Migration assistance as compile and performance errors are encountered
    Performance testing and tuning
    Implementation Strategy
    Post Implementation monitoring and support

    Please contact my via phone 732-734-0147 or by email at
    fmahmood@eteaminc.com.

    Regards,

    Faisal

  7. The worst things in life are free! (Was: Re: Longtime VMS system manager/programmer available)

    Hi Arne,

    > The good thing (for developers in general not for those making
    > tools) is that the new standard price for development tools
    > are zero.


    Excellent - You're my kind o' retailer!

    Please send me one of your lovely copies of "Flex Builder 3 - Professional".
    (I have it down as AUD$1175.00 but I'm more than happy to give you my
    business. But don't try to slip me one of those "Standard" jobbies for
    AUD$419.00.)

    How 'bout the whole enchilada "CS3 Master Edition" at AUD$4,500.00 RRP?
    Arne's software shack still knocking that out at $0.00 a pop :-)

    Cheers Richard Maher

    PS. But I do like Eclipse and Subversion (and Easy Eclipse is good for
    plugins if you're as lazy as me) and Google's got some amazing stuff for
    free, but I guess I just don't understand the business model for this
    freeware. (But then I really don't understand VMS middle-management pitching
    a quality, robust, secure, high-performance and, ultimately, expensive
    OS/hardware platform at people who are more than happy with a GoDaddy
    virtual server with Linux-Apache-Perl-MySQL fo $26/month.)

    You get what you pay for I suppose. . .

    "Arne Vajhøj" wrote in message
    news:48010e01$0$90274$14726298@news.sunsite.dk...
    > Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
    > > Generally, you have to use the tools that are available, whatever they
    > > might be. It has been a while since I looked at pricing but a Fortran
    > > compiler license for the VAX 11/750 used to cost $5,000 US. The price
    > > was approximately the same for ANY of the available compilers. This
    > > meant that you didn't always have the appropriate tool for the job; you
    > > had to "make do" with whatever was available.

    >
    > Price of tools are often an important factor in the decision
    > about tools.
    >
    > The good thing (for developers in general not for those making
    > tools) is that the new standard price for development tools
    > are zero.
    >
    > Arne





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