zeroing out errors? - VMS

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  1. zeroing out errors?

    Is there an easy way to zero out the error count you see with SHOW DEV
    D
    without rebooting?

  2. Re: zeroing out errors?

    On Mar 26, 10:22*am, tadamsmar wrote:
    > Is there an easy way to zero out the error count you see with SHOW DEV
    > D
    > without rebooting?


    With VMS 7.3-2 and higher you can just "$ set device/reset=error
    ddcu:" - see "$ help set device" - if you're using an older version of
    VMS then search some of the better VMS FTP sites for the ZDEC
    (ZeroDeviceErrorCount) too.

  3. Re: zeroing out errors?

    tadamsmar wrote:

    > Is there an easy way to zero out the error count you see with SHOW DEV
    > D without rebooting?


    $ set device/reset=error dka400:

    For older versions of VMS prior to that command being implemented,
    use DELTA (I'm not going to hand-hold you through that).

  4. Re: zeroing out errors?

    In article , "R.A.Omond" writes:
    >tadamsmar wrote:
    >
    >> Is there an easy way to zero out the error count you see with SHOW DEV
    >> D without rebooting?

    >
    >$ set device/reset=error dka400:
    >
    >For older versions of VMS prior to that command being implemented,
    >use DELTA (I'm not going to hand-hold you through that).


    I put together the blurb for DELTA that is included in the OpenVMS FAQ.
    Here it is for reference from an earlier (non-HTMLized) version of the
    OpenVMS FAQ:

    ------------------------------------------------------------
    MGMT31. How do I reset the error count(s)?

    The system reboot is the only supported approach, but it is obviously
    undesirable in various situations -- there is presently no supported
    mechanism to reset error counts once the error(s) have been logged.

    As for an unsupported approach -- and be aware of the potential for
    causing a system crash...

    To reset the error count, one needs to determine the system address of
    the error count field. For a device, this is at an offset within the
    device's UCB structure. On VAX, the field is at an offset symbolically
    defined as UCB$W_ERRCNT. On Alpha, this field's offset is symbolically
    defined as UCB$L_ERRCNT. The former is a word in size; the latter is
    a longword. (Could it be that Alpha devices are more error prone?

    You now need to locate the system address of the UCB$%_ERRCNT field of
    the device you wish to reset. Enter SDA. In the following, you will
    see designations in {} separated by a /. The first item in braces is
    to be used on the VAX and the second item should be used on an Alpha.
    (ie. {VAX/Alpha})

    $ ANALYZE/SYSTEM
    SDA> READ SYS${SYSTEM/LOADABLE_IMAGES}:SYSDEF.STB
    SDA> SHOW DEVICE ! device designation of device with error
    SDA> EVALUATE UCB+UCB${W/L}_ERRCNT
    Hex = hhhhhhhh Decimal = -dddddddddd UCB+offset

    Record the hexadecimal value 'hhhhhhhh' returned.

    You can now exit from SDA and $ RUN SYS$SHAREELTA or do what I prefer
    to do, issue the following:

    SDA> SPAWN RUN SYS$SHAREELTA

    On both VAX and Alpha, the DELTA debugger will be invoked and will ident-
    ify itself. On Alpha, there will be an Alpha instruction decoded. For
    those unfamiliar with DELTA, it does not have a prompt and only one error
    message -- Eh? (Well, for sake of argument, there might be another error
    produced on the console if you're not careful -- aka. a system crash!)

    If you are on a VAX, enter the command: [W
    If you are on Alpha, enter the command: [L

    These set the prevailing mode to word and longword respectively. Remem-
    ber the UCB${W/L)_ERRCNT differences?

    Now issue the command 1;M
    DELTA will respond with 00000001

    You're now poised to ZAP the error count field. To do so you need to en-
    ter the system address and view its contents. The format of the command
    to do this is of the form:

    :/

    For an IPID, use the IPID of the SWAPPER process. It is always: 00010001

    Thus, to ZAP the error count, you would enter:

    00010001:hhhhhhhh/

    When you enter the / SDA will return the content of the address hhhhhhhh.
    This should be the error count (in hexadecimal) of the device in question.
    If it is not, you did something wrong and I'd suggest you type a carriage
    return and then enter the command EXIT to get out of DELTA. Regroup and
    see where your session went awry.

    If you entered your address correctly and the error count was returned as
    in the following example, you can proceed.

    00010001:80D9C6C8/0001 ! output on VAX 1 error

    00010001:80D9C6C8/00000001 ! output on Alpha 1 error


    You can now ZAP the error count by entering a zero and typing a carriage
    return. For example:


    00010001:80D9C6C8/0001 0 ! output on VAX 1 error
    00010001:80D9C6C8/00000001 0 ! output on Alpha 1 error

    Now type the command EXIT and a carriage return.
    [Brian Schenkenberger]


    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    http://tmesis.com/drat.html

  5. Re: zeroing out errors?

    tadamsmar writes:
    > Is there an easy way to zero out the error count you see with SHOW DEV
    > D without rebooting?


    Depending on the version of the operating system, look at

    $ HELP SET DEVICE /RESET

    --

    Rob Brooks MSL -- Nashua brooks!cuebid.zko.hp.com

  6. Re: zeroing out errors?

    In article , tadamsmar writes:
    > Is there an easy way to zero out the error count you see with SHOW DEV
    > D
    > without rebooting?


    Yes. But it has no benefits so it may not be maintained. If you
    look around there is a kernel mode hack that does this.


  7. Re: zeroing out errors?

    On Mar 27, 10:14*am, koeh...@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob
    Koehler) wrote:
    > In article , tadamsmar writes:
    >
    > > Is there an easy way to zero out the error count you see with SHOW DEV
    > > D
    > > without rebooting?

    >
    > * *Yes. *But it has no benefits so it may not be maintained. *If you
    > * *look around there is a kernel mode hack that does this.



  8. Re: zeroing out errors?

    On Mar 27, 10:14*am, koeh...@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob
    Koehler) wrote:
    > In article , tadamsmar writes:
    >
    > > Is there an easy way to zero out the error count you see with SHOW DEV
    > > D
    > > without rebooting?

    >
    > * *Yes. *But it has no benefits so it may not be maintained. *If you
    > * *look around there is a kernel mode hack that does this.


    Use SET/DEV/RESET.

    Only benefit is that its easier to keep track of when I have new
    errors. I don't have to remember that it was "42" or whatever the
    last time I checked.

  9. Re: zeroing out errors?

    tadamsmar wrote:
    > On Mar 27, 10:14 am, koeh...@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob
    > Koehler) wrote:
    >
    >>In article , tadamsmar writes:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Is there an easy way to zero out the error count you see with SHOW DEV
    >>>D
    >>>without rebooting?

    >>
    >> Yes. But it has no benefits so it may not be maintained. If you
    >> look around there is a kernel mode hack that does this.

    >
    >
    > Use SET/DEV/RESET.
    >
    > Only benefit is that its easier to keep track of when I have new
    > errors. I don't have to remember that it was "42" or whatever the
    > last time I checked.


    I once wrote some DCL to check the error count and notify me if the
    count had increased. It was part of a larger procedure that I ran every
    workday morning to check for problems that needed my attention. I may
    still have a copy somewhere if anyone cares.


  10. Re: zeroing out errors?

    "Richard B. Gilbert" wrote:
    >
    > tadamsmar wrote:
    > > On Mar 27, 10:14 am, koeh...@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob
    > > Koehler) wrote:
    > >
    > >>In article , tadamsmar writes:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>>Is there an easy way to zero out the error count you see with SHOW DEV
    > >>>D
    > >>>without rebooting?
    > >>
    > >> Yes. But it has no benefits so it may not be maintained. If you
    > >> look around there is a kernel mode hack that does this.

    > >
    > >
    > > Use SET/DEV/RESET.
    > >
    > > Only benefit is that its easier to keep track of when I have new
    > > errors. I don't have to remember that it was "42" or whatever the
    > > last time I checked.

    >
    > I once wrote some DCL to check the error count and notify me if the
    > count had increased. It was part of a larger procedure that I ran every
    > workday morning to check for problems that needed my attention. I may
    > still have a copy somewhere if anyone cares.


    Simple enough to take a DIFF between successive SHOW ERROR/OUT=file.

    ....though I do like to zero out huge error counts when they happen so if
    they happen again its REAL obvious!

    David J Dachtera
    (formerly dba) DJE Systems

  11. Re: zeroing out errors?

    tadamsmar wrote:
    > On Mar 27, 10:14 am, koeh...@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob
    > [snip]
    > Only benefit is that its easier to keep track of when I have new
    > errors. I don't have to remember that it was "42" or whatever the
    > last time I checked.


    Trying to remember error counts when you have a large number of disks
    can be quite challenging.

    Try this DCL command procedure instead:



    Jim.
    --
    www.eight-cubed.com

  12. Re: zeroing out errors?

    Richard B. Gilbert wrote:
    > tadamsmar wrote:
    >> On Mar 27, 10:14 am, koeh...@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob
    >> Koehler) wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article
    >>> ,
    >>> tadamsmar writes:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Is there an easy way to zero out the error count you see with SHOW DEV
    >>>> D
    >>>> without rebooting?
    >>>
    >>> Yes. But it has no benefits so it may not be maintained. If you
    >>> look around there is a kernel mode hack that does this.

    >>
    >>
    >> Use SET/DEV/RESET.
    >>
    >> Only benefit is that its easier to keep track of when I have new
    >> errors. I don't have to remember that it was "42" or whatever the
    >> last time I checked.

    >
    > I once wrote some DCL to check the error count and notify me if the
    > count had increased. It was part of a larger procedure that I ran every
    > workday morning to check for problems that needed my attention. I may
    > still have a copy somewhere if anyone cares.
    >


    Sounds useful! I'd like it, please. Thanks in advance.

    . fred . music at triumf dot c a

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