Re: Long term archiving of VMS stuff - VMS

This is a discussion on Re: Long term archiving of VMS stuff - VMS ; > Fifteen or twenty years ago, there was an archiving format known as ARC > which has since been superceded by ZIP. Can anybody read ARC today? Got it right here on my Winbox. Actually, it's PKPAK, which can read ...

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Thread: Re: Long term archiving of VMS stuff

  1. Re: Long term archiving of VMS stuff

    > Fifteen or twenty years ago, there was an archiving format known as ARC
    > which has since been superceded by ZIP. Can anybody read ARC today?


    Got it right here on my Winbox. Actually, it's PKPAK, which can read ARC files. There
    was some legal battle over the name "ARC".

    > How many people today have the necessary hardware to read 8" floppies?


    Amazing how many 8" floppies that some government labs have, written on a PDP-11, that
    contains data that can't be replaced. ('cuz we don't do nuclear weapons tests anymore.)

    > Or even 5.25" for that matter? 9-track tape?


    I can read both of those.

    > All of those were still in use 20 years ago and two of them were very
    > common. Today?


    [Shameless Plug Alert (tm)] http://www.stanq.com/conversion.html


    I have a similar story -- I did my master's thesis on a nice Xerox 820 word-processor
    (circa 1980, 8", hard-sectored). At a second job, they have a way to convert it to their
    word-processing system. I did that. That company changed to a different system, and
    they offered me a choice of conversion to the new system, or to text. Thought that ASCII
    would be around forever.

    http://www.stanq.com/quayle-thesis.html

    And so it is...

    --Stan Quayle
    Quayle Consulting Inc.

    ----------
    Stanley F. Quayle, P.E. N8SQ Toll free: 1-888-I-LUV-VAX
    8572 North Spring Ct., Pickerington, OH 43147 USA
    stan-at-stanq-dot-com http://www.stanq.com/charon-vax.html
    "OpenVMS, when downtime is not an option"



  2. Re: Long term archiving of VMS stuff

    In article <47C56677.856.ABBF6E1@infovax.stanq.com>,
    "Stanley F. Quayle" writes:
    >> Fifteen or twenty years ago, there was an archiving format known as ARC
    >> which has since been superceded by ZIP. Can anybody read ARC today?

    >
    > Got it right here on my Winbox. Actually, it's PKPAK, which can read ARC files. There
    > was some legal battle over the name "ARC".
    >
    >> How many people today have the necessary hardware to read 8" floppies?

    >
    > Amazing how many 8" floppies that some government labs have, written on a PDP-11, that
    > contains data that can't be replaced. ('cuz we don't do nuclear weapons tests anymore.)


    Really? Send them (the copntacts, not the disks :-) to me. I still have
    a number of machines that can do 8" floppies and I have a system that can
    do RX02 all the way down to raw transfer of disk images set up right now
    as I am looking at some disks for a bloke in England. I can probably help
    them. And, believe it or not, if this involved classified data I can
    probably put together a system at a secure facility to help them recover
    this data. If it really is valuable enough that they want to get it back.

    >
    >> Or even 5.25" for that matter? 9-track tape?

    >
    > I can read both of those.


    Which formats? RX50? All 500 different CPM formats? OS9? Tandy? :-)

    9-track is really a no-brainer, But it is interesting to note that
    most people have gotten rid of all their 9-track drives, this place
    for example. I periodically have people come to me with tapes they
    need read. the datacenter sends them to me as the last resident
    dinosaur here at the University.

    >
    >> All of those were still in use 20 years ago and two of them were very
    >> common. Today?

    >
    > [Shameless Plug Alert (tm)] http://www.stanq.com/conversion.html
    >
    >
    > I have a similar story -- I did my master's thesis on a nice Xerox 820 word-processor
    > (circa 1980, 8", hard-sectored). At a second job, they have a way to convert it to their
    > word-processing system. I did that. That company changed to a different system, and
    > they offered me a choice of conversion to the new system, or to text. Thought that ASCII
    > would be around forever.
    >
    > http://www.stanq.com/quayle-thesis.html
    >
    > And so it is...


    How about if I one-up you again. I have a brand new, still in the box,
    never had the components installed Xerox-820 motherboard still up in my
    attic. And, yes, I could put my hands on it anytime I wanted. I really
    should build it before the parts all disappear. It would make a nice
    new :-) CPM machine.

    bill


    --
    Bill Gunshannon | de-moc-ra-cy (di mok' ra see) n. Three wolves
    billg999@cs.scranton.edu | and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    University of Scranton |
    Scranton, Pennsylvania | #include

  3. Re: Long term archiving of VMS stuff

    Stanley F. Quayle wrote:
    >> Fifteen or twenty years ago, there was an archiving format known as ARC
    >> which has since been superceded by ZIP. Can anybody read ARC today?

    >
    > Got it right here on my Winbox. Actually, it's PKPAK, which can read ARC files. There
    > was some legal battle over the name "ARC".


    And if someone does not have it they can get it:
    source at http://sourceforge.net/projects/ARC
    link to binaries at
    http://www.filewatcher.com/m/arc602.exe.138538.0.0.html

    But I wonder - I am 95% sure that I once had source code
    for a VMS version - where did that code ??

    Arne

  4. Re: Long term archiving of VMS stuff

    Stanley F. Quayle wrote:
    > On 27 Feb 2008 at 18:50, Bill Gunshannon wrote:
    >> And, believe it or not, if this involved classified data I can probably put
    >> together a system at a secure facility to help them recover this data.

    >
    > If you don't have a clearance (DOE "Q"), they'll need to assign you a person with a
    > clearance to make sure you're not accessing the data, just copying it. But all the
    > people with the correct clearances are already working 100%+ on other projects. And that
    > person would get no other work done while they're watching your every move.



    You have not had fun until you try to correct an old LN03 laser printer
    print quality issue without ever being able to see a single sheet of
    paper... not even a test sheet as there "might be a ghost image of
    something secure that you are not allowed to see"... And the only thing
    in the room I can actually see (as everything else is draped with cloth
    sheets) is the a lone ln03 printer in the middle of the room.

    [them] Here is the printer - stand right here and do not look over your
    shoulder.... Problem is print quality a bit fuzzy all over the page...
    [me] Here, let me make a few adjustments...[print page] How is that?
    [them] still a little fuzzy on the right edge
    [me] Here, let me make a few adjustments...[print page] How is that?
    [them] now a little fuzzy on the left edge
    [me] Here, let me make a few adjustments...[print page] How is that?
    [them] Perfect.
    [me] Okay, I will have to take your word for it...

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