Samba Gains Legal Access to Microsoft Network File Protocols - VMS

This is a discussion on Samba Gains Legal Access to Microsoft Network File Protocols - VMS ; All, This might be of interest to this newsgroup. http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,2239112,00.asp "Samba and the Software Freedom Law Center sign an agreement with Microsoftthat gives them full access to Microsoft's server protocols." "On Dec. 20, the Samba Group and the Software Freedom ...

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Thread: Samba Gains Legal Access to Microsoft Network File Protocols

  1. Samba Gains Legal Access to Microsoft Network File Protocols

    All,

    This might be of interest to this newsgroup.

    http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,2239112,00.asp
    "Samba and the Software Freedom Law Center sign an agreement with Microsoftthat gives
    them full access to Microsoft's server protocols."

    "On Dec. 20, the Samba Group and the Software Freedom Law Center announced a deal with
    Microsoft that places all of Microsoft's network protocols needed for programs to work with
    Windows Server into the hands of the newly formed Protocol Freedom Information
    Foundation.

    The PFIF is a U.S.-based nonprofit corporation. It will make Microsoft's server network protocol
    documentation available to open-source developers such as Samba, which creates programs
    for Windows Server interoperability, and private companies. This information is provided
    under an NDA (nondisclosure agreement) and developers must agree to the NDAbefore
    gaining access to the documentation."

    [snip .. see url for rest of article]

    Regards

    Kerry Main
    Senior Consultant
    HP Services Canada
    Voice: 613-592-4660
    Fax: 613-591-4477
    kerryDOTmainAThpDOTcom
    (remove the DOT's and AT)

    OpenVMS - the secure, multi-site OS that just works.




  2. Re: Samba Gains Legal Access to Microsoft Network File Protocols

    Main, Kerry wrote:
    > The PFIF is a U.S.-based nonprofit corporation. It will make Microsoft's server network protocol
    > documentation available to open-source developers such as Samba, which creates programs
    > for Windows Server interoperability, and private companies. This information is provided
    > under an NDA (nondisclosure agreement) and developers must agree to the NDA before
    > gaining access to the documentation."



    Humm, interesting twst to this. Can NDA and "open source" really
    function together ?

  3. Re: Samba Gains Legal Access to Microsoft Network File Protocols

    In article <476c3908$0$16159$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com>, JF Mezei writes:
    >
    >
    >Main, Kerry wrote:
    >> The PFIF is a U.S.-based nonprofit corporation. It will make Microsoft's server network protocol
    >> documentation available to open-source developers such as Samba, which creates programs
    >> for Windows Server interoperability, and private companies. This information is provided
    >> under an NDA (nondisclosure agreement) and developers must agree to the NDA before
    >> gaining access to the documentation."

    >
    >
    >Humm, interesting twst to this. Can NDA and "open source" really
    >function together ?


    In the Micro$oft space, NDA stands for Nitwit Designed Algorithms; hence,
    they can certainly coexist in the open source space.

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    http://tmesis.com/drat.html

  4. Re: Samba Gains Legal Access to Microsoft Network File Protocols

    In article <476c3908$0$16159$c3e8da3@news.astraweb.com>, JF Mezei writes:
    >Main, Kerry wrote:
    >> The PFIF is a U.S.-based nonprofit corporation. It will make Microsoft's server network protocol
    >> documentation available to open-source developers such as Samba, which creates programs
    >> for Windows Server interoperability, and private companies. This information is provided
    >> under an NDA (nondisclosure agreement) and developers must agree to the NDA before
    >> gaining access to the documentation."

    >
    >
    >Humm, interesting twst to this. Can NDA and "open source" really
    >function together ?



    See

    http://samba.org/samba/PFIF/PFIF_agreement.html

    for Andrew Tridgell's comments on the Samba team's negotiations on this
    agreement.


    David Webb
    Security team leader
    CCSS
    Middlesex University

  5. Re: Samba Gains Legal Access to Microsoft Network File Protocols

    On Dec 21, 1:44 pm, "Main, Kerry" wrote:
    > All,
    >
    > This might be of interest to this newsgroup.
    >
    > http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,2239112,00.asp
    > "Samba and the Software Freedom Law Center sign an agreement with Microsoft that gives
    > them full access to Microsoft's server protocols."
    >
    > "On Dec. 20, the Samba Group and the Software Freedom Law Center announced a deal with
    > Microsoft that places all of Microsoft's network protocols needed for programs to work with
    > Windows Server into the hands of the newly formed Protocol Freedom Information
    > Foundation.
    >
    > The PFIF is a U.S.-based nonprofit corporation. It will make Microsoft's server network protocol
    > documentation available to open-source developers such as Samba, which creates programs
    > for Windows Server interoperability, and private companies. This information is provided
    > under an NDA (nondisclosure agreement) and developers must agree to the NDA before
    > gaining access to the documentation."
    >
    > [snip .. see url for rest of article]
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > Kerry Main
    > Senior Consultant
    > HP Services Canada
    > Voice: 613-592-4660
    > Fax: 613-591-4477
    > kerryDOTmainAThpDOTcom
    > (remove the DOT's and AT)
    >
    > OpenVMS - the secure, multi-site OS that just works.


    Hmmm. I believe I once commented on how, if HP decided to destroy
    OpenVMS source files, that the gov't should step in and save them.
    Some here scolded me for that, and I retracted.

    Is this somehow different in that respect? Is anyone who "scolded" me
    for that against this?

    AEF

  6. OT: - Sort-of... since we are again bemoaning the demise of DEC.

    Main, Kerry wrote:
    > All,
    >
    > This might be of interest to this newsgroup.
    >
    > http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,2239112,00.asp
    > "Samba and the Software Freedom Law Center sign an agreement with Microsoft that gives
    > them full access to Microsoft's server protocols."
    >
    > "On Dec. 20, the Samba Group and the Software Freedom Law Center announced a deal with
    > Microsoft that places all of Microsoft's network protocols needed for programs to work with
    > Windows Server into the hands of the newly formed Protocol Freedom Information
    > Foundation.
    >
    > The PFIF is a U.S.-based nonprofit corporation. It will make Microsoft's server network protocol
    > documentation available to open-source developers such as Samba, which creates programs
    > for Windows Server interoperability, and private companies. This information is provided
    > under an NDA (nondisclosure agreement) and developers must agree to the NDA before
    > gaining access to the documentation."
    >
    > [snip .. see url for rest of article]
    >
    > Regards
    >
    > Kerry Main
    > Senior Consultant
    > HP Services Canada
    > Voice: 613-592-4660
    > Fax: 613-591-4477
    > kerryDOTmainAThpDOTcom
    > (remove the DOT's and AT)
    >
    > OpenVMS - the secure, multi-site OS that just works.
    >
    >
    >


    Does anyone know where Cache-Fusion aka Oracle Cluster Ready Services
    came from?

    Someone mentioned Solaris 10 - it is definitely catching up to the
    clustering capabilities of Tru64/VMS, but not quite. It really helps if
    they use the afore-mentioned Oracle Cache Fusion. As I understand it
    from some Oracle CRS engineers, OCF/CRS is the lock-manager and cluster
    interconnect licensed from HP from the Tru64 Clustering bits. Which we
    all know was converted from our beloved OpenVMS.

    Just thought it to be very interesting...

    Michael.


  7. Re: - Sort-of... since we are again bemoaning the demise of DEC.

    Hi Michael,

    > Does anyone know where Cache-Fusion aka Oracle Cluster Ready Services
    > came from?


    I recall Norm Lastovica pointing out that Cache-Fusion is possible because
    Oracle's DLM-copy is able to have Lock-Value-Blocks of unlimited (at least
    big) size. Therefore the database page can move around the cluster with the
    lock. I've never heard any other explanation and it would certainly make
    things easier, but there must be a downside or presumably VMS engineering
    would have added similar functionality?

    Given that Rdb has long since turned its back on VMS clusters and has
    officially advised all and sundry to attach to the database over the network
    so that they could ddeploy Norm's lazy-writer and blue-eyed-boy "Row-Cache",
    there would seem little point in persuing this functionality outside of the
    scope of Orrible Oracle :-(

    Cheers Richard Maher

    "Michael Austin" wrote in message
    news:OBRfj.3146$El5.2002@newssvr22.news.prodigy.ne t...
    > Main, Kerry wrote:
    > > All,
    > >
    > > This might be of interest to this newsgroup.
    > >
    > > http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,2239112,00.asp
    > > "Samba and the Software Freedom Law Center sign an agreement with

    Microsoft that gives
    > > them full access to Microsoft's server protocols."
    > >
    > > "On Dec. 20, the Samba Group and the Software Freedom Law Center

    announced a deal with
    > > Microsoft that places all of Microsoft's network protocols needed for

    programs to work with
    > > Windows Server into the hands of the newly formed Protocol Freedom

    Information
    > > Foundation.
    > >
    > > The PFIF is a U.S.-based nonprofit corporation. It will make Microsoft's

    server network protocol
    > > documentation available to open-source developers such as Samba, which

    creates programs
    > > for Windows Server interoperability, and private companies. This

    information is provided
    > > under an NDA (nondisclosure agreement) and developers must agree to the

    NDA before
    > > gaining access to the documentation."
    > >
    > > [snip .. see url for rest of article]
    > >
    > > Regards
    > >
    > > Kerry Main
    > > Senior Consultant
    > > HP Services Canada
    > > Voice: 613-592-4660
    > > Fax: 613-591-4477
    > > kerryDOTmainAThpDOTcom
    > > (remove the DOT's and AT)
    > >
    > > OpenVMS - the secure, multi-site OS that just works.
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    > Does anyone know where Cache-Fusion aka Oracle Cluster Ready Services
    > came from?
    >
    > Someone mentioned Solaris 10 - it is definitely catching up to the
    > clustering capabilities of Tru64/VMS, but not quite. It really helps if
    > they use the afore-mentioned Oracle Cache Fusion. As I understand it
    > from some Oracle CRS engineers, OCF/CRS is the lock-manager and cluster
    > interconnect licensed from HP from the Tru64 Clustering bits. Which we
    > all know was converted from our beloved OpenVMS.
    >
    > Just thought it to be very interesting...
    >
    > Michael.
    >




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