Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP - VMS

This is a discussion on Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP - VMS ; I have one of my VMS boxes set up to record and save a certain radio show. As a service to my fellow fans out of the area, I make it available for download on the web, over my relatively ...

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Thread: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

  1. Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

    I have one of my VMS boxes set up to record and save a certain radio
    show. As a service to my fellow fans out of the area, I make it
    available for download on the web, over my relatively slow DSL
    connection.

    The problem is I got a new ethernet switch, which seems to have a big
    buffer. It is killing the latency from my other machines.

    The ideal solution to this (short of IPv6 packet prioritization) would
    be to limit the Apache web server to a certain fixed bandwidth lower
    than my total available on DSL, so then the buffer would not fill up.

    A less desireable solution would be to put the bandwidth limit on
    TCPIP Services for OpenVMS as a whole.

    How?

    Pointers to docs on how to do either of these would be greatly
    appreciated.

  2. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

    On Nov 21, 10:14 am, Keith Lewis wrote:
    > I have one of my VMS boxes set up to record and save a certain radio
    > show. As a service to my fellow fans out of the area, I make it
    > available for download on the web, over my relatively slow DSL
    > connection.
    >
    > The problem is I got a new ethernet switch, which seems to have a big
    > buffer. It is killing the latency from my other machines.
    >
    > The ideal solution to this (short of IPv6 packet prioritization) would
    > be to limit the Apache web server to a certain fixed bandwidth lower
    > than my total available on DSL, so then the buffer would not fill up.
    >
    > A less desireable solution would be to put the bandwidth limit on
    > TCPIP Services for OpenVMS as a whole.
    >
    > How?
    >
    > Pointers to docs on how to do either of these would be greatly
    > appreciated.


    Keith,

    For form, please identify the versions of OpenVMS, TCP/IP, and CSWS
    that are being used. Also, what is the make and model of your switch?
    Is it a managed switch?

    - Bob Gezelter, http://www.rlgsc.com

  3. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

    On Nov 21, 2:52 pm, Bob Gezelter wrote:
    > On Nov 21, 10:14 am, Keith Lewis wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > I have one of my VMS boxes set up to record and save a certain radio
    > > show. As a service to my fellow fans out of the area, I make it
    > > available for download on the web, over my relatively slow DSL
    > > connection.

    >
    > > The problem is I got a new ethernet switch, which seems to have a big
    > > buffer. It is killing the latency from my other machines.

    >
    > > The ideal solution to this (short of IPv6 packet prioritization) would
    > > be to limit theApacheweb server to a certain fixed bandwidth lower
    > > than my total available on DSL, so then the buffer would not fill up.

    >
    > > A less desireable solution would be to put the bandwidth limit on
    > > TCPIP Services for OpenVMS as a whole.

    >
    > > How?

    >
    > > Pointers to docs on how to do either of these would be greatly
    > > appreciated.

    >
    > Keith,
    >
    > For form, please identify the versions of OpenVMS, TCP/IP, and CSWS
    > that are being used. Also, what is the make and model of your switch?
    > Is it a managed switch?
    >
    > - Bob Gezelter,http://www.rlgsc.com


    It's VMS 7.3-1 (version 8 has no audio)
    TCPIP V5.4
    CSWS 1.2 I think. I rejected the "all files must be stmlf" upgrade.
    Trendnet TE-100-SB, very cheap, not managed

    But throttling parameter info for *any* version of Apache or TCP would
    be welcome.

  4. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

    I think hrottling is done more at the switch level than at the host.

    For instance, on my old 2924EN Cisco switch, there is a "fair-queue"
    interface parameter as well as max-reserved-bandwidth.


    fair-queue Enable Fair Queuing on an Interface
    max-reserved-bandwidth Maximum Reservable Bandwidth on an Interface


    Does your alpha have 2 ethernet interfaces ? Perhaps you could have yor
    radio traffic go though a different IP/interface and then use the switch
    to restrict throughput on that interface. (while the primary interface
    on your alpha would work at full speed).


    If your switch doesn't not offer any management, have you considered
    setting up the apache server to have the supprocesses that are related
    to the radio stuff run at a very low priority ?


    Another possibility would be to change sysconfig parameters such as
    window-size to an inefficient setting which would slow down the trhoughput.

    IN: sys$startup:tcpip$systartup.com

    $SYSCONFIG = "$SYS$SYSTEM:TCPIP$SYSCONFIG.EXE"
    $SYSCONFIG -r inet tcp_recvspace=129904
    $SYSCONFIG -r inet tcp_sendspace=129904

    Obviously, you would want to reduce those numbers. But this would "ruin"
    all TCPIP communications.

  5. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

    In article <604bd536-1bc0-414e-83f7-3a09d3f470a0@g21g2000hsh.googlegroups.com>, Keith Lewis writes:
    >It's VMS 7.3-1 (version 8 has no audio)


    Why not V7.3-2?

    >TCPIP V5.4


    ECO7 perhaps?

    >CSWS 1.2 I think. I rejected the "all files must be stmlf" upgrade.


    You missed CSWS V2.1 (ECO1) vs V2.0 features?

    --
    Peter "EPLAN" LANGSTOEGER
    Network and OpenVMS system specialist
    E-mail peter@langstoeger.at
    A-1030 VIENNA AUSTRIA I'm not a pessimist, I'm a realist

  6. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

    Keith Lewis wrote:
    > I have one of my VMS boxes set up to record and save a certain radio
    > show. As a service to my fellow fans out of the area, I make it
    > available for download on the web, over my relatively slow DSL
    > connection.
    >
    > The problem is I got a new ethernet switch, which seems to have a big
    > buffer. It is killing the latency from my other machines.
    >
    > The ideal solution to this (short of IPv6 packet prioritization) would
    > be to limit the Apache web server to a certain fixed bandwidth lower
    > than my total available on DSL, so then the buffer would not fill up.
    >
    > A less desireable solution would be to put the bandwidth limit on
    > TCPIP Services for OpenVMS as a whole.
    >
    > How?
    >
    > Pointers to docs on how to do either of these would be greatly
    > appreciated.


    I'm using a Draytek router/switch for my connection with the Internet.
    It has the possibility to limit the traffic on any of the four switch ports.

  7. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

    Dirk Munk wrote:
    > Keith Lewis wrote:
    >> I have one of my VMS boxes set up to record and save a certain radio
    >> show. As a service to my fellow fans out of the area, I make it
    >> available for download on the web, over my relatively slow DSL
    >> connection.
    >>
    >> The problem is I got a new ethernet switch, which seems to have a big
    >> buffer. It is killing the latency from my other machines.
    >>
    >> The ideal solution to this (short of IPv6 packet prioritization) would
    >> be to limit the Apache web server to a certain fixed bandwidth lower
    >> than my total available on DSL, so then the buffer would not fill up.
    >>
    >> A less desireable solution would be to put the bandwidth limit on
    >> TCPIP Services for OpenVMS as a whole.
    >>
    >> How?
    >>
    >> Pointers to docs on how to do either of these would be greatly
    >> appreciated.

    >
    > I'm using a Draytek router/switch for my connection with the Internet.
    > It has the possibility to limit the traffic on any of the four switch
    > ports.

    Sorry, I should have been more precise.

    It has the possibility to set the Quality of Service. For instance I can
    set a rule whereby I reserve 75% of the outgoing bandwith for HTTP, so I
    have 25% left for other things. Is this what you are looking for?

  8. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

    In article , Keith Lewis writes:
    >
    >
    >I have one of my VMS boxes set up to record and save a certain radio
    >show. As a service to my fellow fans out of the area, I make it
    >available for download on the web, over my relatively slow DSL
    >connection.


    You're lucky that the RIAA hasn't sent out their representatives (Doug
    and Dinsdal Piranha) to 'throttle' you for this practice. An internet
    radio I am affiliated with was "legitimately" (Is dotted and Ts crossed
    contracts) rebroadcasting an FM radio show until the RIAA cracked down
    back before the summer.

    Count your blessings that the RIAA's "other other operation" hasn't
    been terrorizing you because of this little operation of yours.


    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    http://tmesis.com/drat.html

  9. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP


    "Dirk Munk" wrote in message
    news:9c00d$4745e9b6$52499ec7$24770@cache4.tilbu1.n b.home.nl...
    > Dirk Munk wrote:
    > > Keith Lewis wrote:
    > >> I have one of my VMS boxes set up to record and save a certain radio
    > >> show. As a service to my fellow fans out of the area, I make it
    > >> available for download on the web, over my relatively slow DSL
    > >> connection.
    > >>
    > >> The problem is I got a new ethernet switch, which seems to have a big
    > >> buffer. It is killing the latency from my other machines.
    > >>
    > >> The ideal solution to this (short of IPv6 packet prioritization) would
    > >> be to limit the Apache web server to a certain fixed bandwidth lower
    > >> than my total available on DSL, so then the buffer would not fill up.
    > >>
    > >> A less desireable solution would be to put the bandwidth limit on
    > >> TCPIP Services for OpenVMS as a whole.
    > >>
    > >> How?
    > >>
    > >> Pointers to docs on how to do either of these would be greatly
    > >> appreciated.

    > >
    > > I'm using a Draytek router/switch for my connection with the Internet.
    > > It has the possibility to limit the traffic on any of the four switch
    > > ports.

    > Sorry, I should have been more precise.
    >
    > It has the possibility to set the Quality of Service. For instance I can
    > set a rule whereby I reserve 75% of the outgoing bandwith for HTTP, so I
    > have 25% left for other things. Is this what you are looking for?


    I was wondering about that concept too, hence my Linux/DSL bandwidth
    management/QoS reference earlier, but I happened to be looking at DSL
    routers yesterday (my D-Link DSL604+ is showing its age) and it seems like
    QoS stuff is no longer confined to higher end or DIY Linux routers. A GBP40
    SoHo router from Billion (7300G) apparently comes complete with
    flexible-looking QoS, SNMP management (but no DSL Line MIB), and even
    something it calls VLAN support. Whether it actually *works* as marketed is
    a different question, but on paper it looks good. Other boxes at similar
    prices also seemed to offer QoS but I didn't look in so much detail.

    If upstream bandwidth saturation due to other folks downloads of the audio
    is the basic issue in this picture (we don't know that for sure yet), a DSL
    router with decent QoS capability could be a nice simple fix.

    regards
    John



  10. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

    On Nov 22, 2:40 am, pe...@langstoeger.at (Peter 'EPLAN' LANGSTOeGER)
    wrote:
    > In article <604bd536-1bc0-414e-83f7-3a09d3f47...@g21g2000hsh.googlegroups.com>, Keith Lewis writes:
    >
    > >It's VMS 7.3-1 (version 8 has no audio)

    >
    > Why not V7.3-2?


    To keep my hobbyist system sort of the same as my systems at work,
    which run an app that uses X-windows bitmap overlays, last seen to
    work in Decwindows 1.2-5.

    > >TCPIP V5.4

    >
    > ECO7 perhaps?


    Lower than that. I can upgrade if that would make a diffference.

    > >CSWS 1.2 I think. I rejected the "all files must be stmlf" upgrade.

    >
    > You missed CSWS V2.1 (ECO1) vs V2.0 features?


    They lifted the restriction? That *is* good news!

  11. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

    John Wallace wrote:
    > 2) I'm not sure why you wouldn't plan to retire the old faithful 10Mbit hub,


    On a managed switch, you usually have the ability to use one port to
    monitor the activity of other ports.

    iN my case, I setup a "PPPOE" VLAN and a "TCPIP" VLAN.

    My lan is in the TCPIP VLAN. And the link between the router and the
    modem is in the PPPOE VLAN. And I have designeted one VMS host to be in
    noth the TCPIP and PPPOE VLANS so that it can then monitor the activity
    between the router and the modem.


    In an unmanaged switch, you have no ability to monitor traffic, hence
    the need for a hub.

  12. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP


    "JF Mezei" wrote in message
    news:cb254$4746a0ec$cef8887a$5790@TEKSAVVY.COM...
    > John Wallace wrote:
    > > 2) I'm not sure why you wouldn't plan to retire the old faithful 10Mbit

    hub,
    >
    > On a managed switch, you usually have the ability to use one port to
    > monitor the activity of other ports.
    >
    > iN my case, I setup a "PPPOE" VLAN and a "TCPIP" VLAN.
    >
    > My lan is in the TCPIP VLAN. And the link between the router and the
    > modem is in the PPPOE VLAN. And I have designeted one VMS host to be in
    > noth the TCPIP and PPPOE VLANS so that it can then monitor the activity
    > between the router and the modem.
    >
    >
    > In an unmanaged switch, you have no ability to monitor traffic, hence
    > the need for a hub.


    Well yes indeed, in the general case.

    In this specific case we already know there's a concern about putting the
    LAVC traffic on a 10Mbit LAN. My suggested config allows the Linux box to
    monitor (and control) traffic to and from the router, but (as you rightly
    point out) the Linux box won't see intra-LAN traffic such as the LAVC
    traffic, or any other traffic that isn't to/from the outside world (or the
    Linux box itself), because the switch should/will filter it out. I'd see
    that as a small price to pay to get the 10Mb hub completely out of the
    picture and have everything on a 100Mb LAN, without the expense of a managed
    switch (unless decent managed switches with mirror ports are now dirt
    cheap). Limiting lots of things to 10Mb purely to allow traffic monitoring
    of all of them wouldn't suit me, it would get seriously irritating every
    time I wanted to copy a file from box to box, or equivalent. I've been
    there, done that, probably still got the 3Com hub I was using at the time,
    in case I ever need a Thinwire connection again, but in the meantime
    everything here is on unmanaged switches and I "manage" without being able
    to do LAN-wide traffic monitoring. Others with different needs may want to
    choose a different compromise

    Have a good weekend,
    John Wallace



  13. Re: Putting a throttle on Apache (CSWS), or all of TCP

    John Wallace wrote:
    > switch (unless decent managed switches with mirror ports are now dirt
    > cheap).



    Ebay is your friend here. Not as reliable as buying new, but if the
    switch you get works well once installed, it should work well for a long
    time.

    I have a Cisco 2924 XL-EN and it has lots of bells and whistles, except
    QoS. (Notes that QoS is mostly used for VoIP applications to give some
    traffic higher priority (not sure you can give it lower priority).

    But even with the 2924, you can limit a port to a certain throughput.

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