NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer - VMS

This is a discussion on NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer - VMS ; NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/?p=864 I had a chance to speak with NASA and SGI at the SC07 supercomputing convention in Reno this week where I saw one of the biggest super computers in the world. Pictured ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 64

Thread: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

  1. NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/?p=864

    I had a chance to speak with NASA and SGI at the SC07 supercomputing
    convention in Reno this week where I saw one of the biggest super
    computers in the world. Pictured left is a 1024-core version of the
    Altix 4700 and NASA just bought one with twice as many processors
    (1024 dual-core Itanium 2 processors) based on the Montecito variant
    of Intel's Itanium 2 processor and 4 Terabytes of RAM.

    This massive supercomputer is the most powerful single node computer
    in the world (based on SPECint_rate2006 and SPECfp_rate2006 database)
    and it has one of the largest single system memory pool in the world.
    For some applications that simply can't be effectively broken down in
    to smaller tasks that a cluster can handle using smaller nodes because
    of excessive communications overhead, this is really the only system
    that can crunch those hard problems.

    To give you some idea how powerful this system is, a 256-core version
    of the SGI Altix 4700 has a SPECfp_rate2006 score of 3507 and a
    SPECint_rate2006 score of 2970. The biggest 16-core Intel X7350 2.93
    GHz server scores 119 on SPECfp_rate2006 and 214 on SPECint_rate2006.
    The biggest 16-core AMD Barcelona server has a SPECfp_rate2006 score
    of 136 and a SPECint_rate2006 score of 160. A 16-core IBM Power6 has
    a SPECfp_rate2006 score of 428 and a SPECint_rate2006 score of 478
    though the latest 32-core version probably has double that
    performance. But even the Power6 is dwarfed by the 256-core SGI
    machine let alone what a 2048-core version can do.

    Of course there are plenty of jobs that do break down nicely for
    clusters and plenty of jobs that don't need that much single-node
    memory. That's why NASA also purchased an Altix "ice" 8200 cluster
    using 16 of the racks pictured left. Each one of these racks contains
    64 dual-processor Intel XEON x86/x64 servers and 16 of these make a
    1024 processor cluster with 4096 XEON CPU cores.

    The Altix 8200 rack includes the 20 gbps InfiniBand switches on the
    sides for the cluster interconnect and the racks can be chained
    together with InfiniBand. NASA has for the most part used very large
    shared memory systems like the Altix 4700 above but they've just
    started buying the clustered systems.

    -----

    Neil Rieck
    Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge,
    Ontario, Canada.
    http://www3.sympatico.ca/n.rieck/






  2. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    Neil Rieck wrote:
    > NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer
    >
    > http://blogs.zdnet.com/Ou/?p=864
    >
    > I had a chance to speak with NASA and SGI at the SC07 supercomputing
    > convention in Reno this week where I saw one of the biggest super
    > computers in the world. Pictured left is a 1024-core version of the
    > Altix 4700 and NASA just bought one with twice as many processors
    > (1024 dual-core Itanium 2 processors) based on the Montecito variant
    > of Intel's Itanium 2 processor and 4 Terabytes of RAM.


    This just more proof nasa need to have all its funding cut off.

    They haven't done anything interesting or worth mentioning in decades,
    aside from crash nearly 30 year old shuttles or play RC car on mars.

    What possible use for a computer (of any sort) does NASA even have at this
    point? Sort of like what the white house spokesperson said bout jimmy
    carter, they're becoming increasingly less relevant.

    Third world countries have more ambitious and interesting space programs
    at this point. It's sad, but true.




  3. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    On Nov 21, 8:36 pm, Cydrome Leader wrote:
    > Neil Rieck wrote:
    > > NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    >

    [...snip...]
    >
    > This just more proof nasa need to have all its funding cut off.
    >
    > They haven't done anything interesting or worth mentioning in decades,
    > aside from crash nearly 30 year old shuttles or play RC car on mars.
    >
    > What possible use for a computer (of any sort) does NASA even have at this
    > point? Sort of like what the white house spokesperson said bout jimmy
    > carter, they're becoming increasingly less relevant.
    >
    > Third world countries have more ambitious and interesting space programs
    > at this point. It's sad, but true.
    >


    I can't argue with anything you just said (typed). Previously NASA was
    primarily an organization of technicians, engineers, and scientists.
    Today it's an organization of bureaucrats and politicians.

    Question: "If we can land on the moon then why can't we land on the
    moon?"

    Neil Rieck
    Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge,
    Ontario, Canada.
    http://www3.sympatico.ca/n.rieck/



  4. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    In article , Cydrome Leader writes:
    >
    > What possible use for a computer (of any sort) does NASA even have at this
    > point? Sort of like what the white house spokesperson said bout jimmy
    > carter, they're becoming increasingly less relevant.


    Get real, or go away. You think NASA does everything by flipping
    switches on analog circuits? You think monitoring the earth's
    atmosphere doesn't include some CPU hungry algorithms to determine
    what it all means?

    Just because you get your news from an outlet that doesn't cover
    everything NASA is doing doesn't mean it isn't happening.

    This reminds me of Fox News' O'Reilly commenting on something NASA
    was doing and ending with "I guess they don't make a big fuss about
    that anymore." It's O'Reilly who refused to take interest in it,
    despite NASA providing plenty of information to the press before,
    during, and after.


  5. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    On Nov 25, 1:00 pm, Neil Rieck wrote:
    > On Nov 21, 8:36 pm, Cydrome Leader wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Neil Rieck wrote:
    > > > NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer


    [...snip...]

    >
    > I can't argue with anything you just said (typed). Previously NASA was
    > primarily an organization of technicians, engineers, and scientists.
    > Today it's an organization of bureaucrats and politicians.
    >
    > Question: "If we can land on the moon then why can't we land on the
    > moon?"
    >


    I hope people don't take my previous comments the wrong way. Being a
    child of the 1950s made me a part of the sputnik craze along with the
    subsequent American manned landings on the moon. But NASA has changed
    and it seems to me that if it weren't for JPL, that there wouldn't be
    much science at all in the American space program. Also, I recently
    heard a story on NPR (thank god for Sirius satelite radio)...

    http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/200711166
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...43713&ft=1&f=5

    ....in which I heard the horrifying tale about Nixon getting rid of the
    position of "Presidential Science Advisor" and how it took an act of
    congress to get it restored. Even still, the president is not required
    to take advice from the science advisor as we all learned in 2004 when
    we learned that whitehouse staff were editing documents from NASA,
    NOAA, etc.

    Neil Rieck
    Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge,
    Ontario, Canada.
    http://www3.sympatico.ca/n.rieck/

  6. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    In article <49f32980-721c-49bf-aada-1295efbce55d@w40g2000hsb.googlegroups.com>, Neil Rieck writes:
    >
    > I hope people don't take my previous comments the wrong way. Being a
    > child of the 1950s made me a part of the sputnik craze along with the
    > subsequent American manned landings on the moon. But NASA has changed
    > and it seems to me that if it weren't for JPL, that there wouldn't be
    > much science at all in the American space program. Also, I recently
    > heard a story on NPR (thank god for Sirius satelite radio)...


    NASA has transformed from the premier engineering organisation that
    did some science on the side to a big bureaucracy that also does
    engineering and science.

    But almost everything we do at the Goddard Space Flight Center is
    science. JPL does most of the deep space missions, GSFC does most
    of the earth orbiting missions; every other NASA installation (JPL
    is actually a contractor) has its specialty.

    So why haven't you heard of the GSFC science missions? Because
    the Hubble Space Telescope is the only one of them the media pays
    any attention enough for its name to be recognised. Its NASA's
    number one PR machine as well as one hell of a good science resource.


  7. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    On Nov 26, 4:44 pm, koeh...@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob
    Koehler) wrote:
    > In article <49f32980-721c-49bf-aada-1295efbce...@w40g2000hsb.googlegroups.com>, Neil Rieck writes:
    >
    >
    >

    [...snip...]
    >
    > NASA has transformed from the premier engineering organisation that
    > did some science on the side to a big bureaucracy that also does
    > engineering and science.
    >
    > But almost everything we do at the Goddard Space Flight Center is
    > science. JPL does most of the deep space missions, GSFC does most
    > of the earth orbiting missions; every other NASA installation (JPL
    > is actually a contractor) has its specialty.
    >
    > So why haven't you heard of the GSFC science missions? Because
    > the Hubble Space Telescope is the only one of them the media pays
    > any attention enough for its name to be recognised. Its NASA's
    > number one PR machine as well as one hell of a good science resource.
    >


    Thanks for that update. I forgot that there were NASA people hanging
    out here.

    p.s. So do you think it's too late for someone like a presidential
    science advisor to get the USA back on track? In this light it would
    be nice if we could get back to the 1960's.

    Neil Rieck
    Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge,
    Ontario, Canada.
    http://www3.sympatico.ca/n.rieck/


  8. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    Neil Rieck wrote:

    > ... to get the USA back on track?


    What *is* "the track" ?
    A track leading to what ?

    Jan-Erik.

  9. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    On Nov 28, 11:26 am, Jan-Erik Söderholm
    wrote:
    > Neil Rieck wrote:
    > > ... to get the USA back on track?

    >
    > What *is* "the track" ?
    > A track leading to what ?
    >
    > Jan-Erik.


    A track where America once again leads all of the world's economies in
    everything it does. A track where America's focus swings back to
    dominance in science, technology and engineering while putting away
    religious fundamentalism, xenophobia, rejection of science. A track
    before the country was politically divided. A track before anyone
    thought that fighting wars in Vietnam or Iraq were a good idea or
    possibly an economic benefit.

    NSR

  10. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    In article <00c4e2d2-3ea5-42e8-8b61-2ceaf1f0b932@o42g2000hsc.googlegroups.com>, Neil Rieck writes:
    >
    >
    >On Nov 28, 11:26 am, Jan-Erik S=F6derholm
    >wrote:
    >> Neil Rieck wrote:
    >> > ... to get the USA back on track?

    >>
    >> What *is* "the track" ?
    >> A track leading to what ?
    >>
    >> Jan-Erik.

    >
    >A track where America once again leads all of the world's economies in
    >everything it does. A track where America's focus swings back to
    >dominance in science, technology and engineering while putting away
    >religious fundamentalism, xenophobia, rejection of science. A track
    >before the country was politically divided. A track before anyone
    >thought that fighting wars in Vietnam or Iraq were a good idea or
    >possibly an economic benefit.


    Neil, as part of the America you are accusing of religious fundamentalism,
    xenophobia, rejection of science... I would like to remind you that there
    are many exceptions to your sterotype. That said, I would love to see the
    American economy at the forefront of of the world's economies.

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    http://tmesis.com/drat.html

  11. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG wrote:
    > In article
    > <00c4e2d2-3ea5-42e8-8b61-2ceaf1f0b932@o42g2000hsc.googlegroups.com>,
    > Neil Rieck writes:
    >>
    >>
    >> On Nov 28, 11:26 am, Jan-Erik S=F6derholm
    >> wrote:
    >>> Neil Rieck wrote:
    >>>> ... to get the USA back on track?
    >>>
    >>> What *is* "the track" ?
    >>> A track leading to what ?
    >>>
    >>> Jan-Erik.

    >>
    >> A track where America once again leads all of the world's economies
    >> in everything it does. A track where America's focus swings back to
    >> dominance in science, technology and engineering while putting away
    >> religious fundamentalism, xenophobia, rejection of science. A track
    >> before the country was politically divided. A track before anyone
    >> thought that fighting wars in Vietnam or Iraq were a good idea or
    >> possibly an economic benefit.

    >
    > Neil, as part of the America you are accusing of religious
    > fundamentalism,
    > xenophobia, rejection of science... I would like to remind you that
    > there
    > are many exceptions to your sterotype. That said, I would love to
    > see the
    > American economy at the forefront of of the world's economies.


    A quick fact check reveals that the US is still the world's largest economy.

    That being said, the dollar has not been this weak since the 60´s, so maybe
    the the past is finally going to catch the greenback - but I would not bet
    on it just yet.

    As for leadership, you are your own masters when it comes to choosing a
    leader - choose a good one.

    Dweeb



  12. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    On Nov 28, 2:03 pm, VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG wrote:
    > In article <00c4e2d2-3ea5-42e8-8b61-2ceaf1f0b...@o42g2000hsc.googlegroups.com>, Neil Rieck writes:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >On Nov 28, 11:26 am, Jan-Erik S=F6derholm
    > >wrote:
    > >> Neil Rieck wrote:
    > >> > ... to get the USA back on track?

    >
    > >> What *is* "the track" ?
    > >> A track leading to what ?

    >
    > >> Jan-Erik.

    >
    > >A track where America once again leads all of the world's economies in
    > >everything it does. A track where America's focus swings back to
    > >dominance in science, technology and engineering while putting away
    > >religious fundamentalism, xenophobia, rejection of science. A track
    > >before the country was politically divided. A track before anyone
    > >thought that fighting wars in Vietnam or Iraq were a good idea or
    > >possibly an economic benefit.

    >
    > Neil, as part of the America you are accusing of religious fundamentalism,
    > xenophobia, rejection of science... I would like to remind you that there
    > are many exceptions to your sterotype. That said, I would love to see the
    > American economy at the forefront of of the world's economies.
    >
    > --
    > VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM
    >
    > "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"
    >
    > http://tmesis.com/drat.html- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I would too.

    And please don't take my comments personally. A few posts back I
    mentioned a recent American radio program telling how Nixon got rid of
    the position of "Presidential Science Advisor". This position was
    created by Eisenhower to kick off the space age but you really have to
    wonder what was Nixon thinking about when he got rid of it? Apparently
    it took an act of congress to get the position reinstated but the
    President is not obliged to take this advice (and I'm convinced that
    Bush isn't). I'd feel more comfortable with a science + technology
    president than I would with one who thinks that stem-cell research is
    a mistake (and I'm no atheist).

    And to the person who sent me a private note telling me the American
    economy is doing just fine I'd just like to say this: In 2003 one
    Canadian dollar got you 67 American cents. Today the Canadian dollar
    is worth more than the American dollar (last month it was $1.07 but is
    closer to $1.01 today). The last time this happened was when the US
    was spending itself into a deep hole called Vietnam.

    Neil Rieck
    Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge,
    Ontario, Canada.
    http://www3.sympatico.ca/n.rieck/

  13. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    Neil Rieck wrote in
    news:303adb89-0e85-457b-861e-9ce2618852ea@g30g2000hsb.googlegroups.com:

    >
    >
    > And to the person who sent me a private note telling me the American
    > economy is doing just fine I'd just like to say this: In 2003 one
    > Canadian dollar got you 67 American cents. Today the Canadian dollar
    > is worth more than the American dollar (last month it was $1.07 but is
    > closer to $1.01 today). The last time this happened was when the US
    > was spending itself into a deep hole called Vietnam.


    Your history is a little off, Neil. The Canadian dollar was high though
    the 50's, declining somewhat in the early 60's. The "Diefenbuck" pegged
    it at US$0.925 in 1962. The Vietnam war was just beginning to ramp up
    then.


    --
    ----------------------------------------------------------------
    A L B E R T A Alfred Falk falk@arc.ab.ca
    R E S E A R C H Information Systems Dept (780)450-5185
    C O U N C I L 250 Karl Clark Road
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    http://www.arc.ab.ca/ T6N 1E4
    http://outside.arc.ab.ca/staff/falk/

  14. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    Neil Rieck wrote:
    > On Nov 26, 4:44 pm, koeh...@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob
    > Koehler) wrote:
    >
    >>In article <49f32980-721c-49bf-aada-1295efbce...@w40g2000hsb.googlegroups.com>, Neil Rieck writes:
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    > [...snip...]
    >
    >> NASA has transformed from the premier engineering organisation that
    >> did some science on the side to a big bureaucracy that also does
    >> engineering and science.
    >>
    >> But almost everything we do at the Goddard Space Flight Center is
    >> science. JPL does most of the deep space missions, GSFC does most
    >> of the earth orbiting missions; every other NASA installation (JPL
    >> is actually a contractor) has its specialty.
    >>
    >> So why haven't you heard of the GSFC science missions? Because
    >> the Hubble Space Telescope is the only one of them the media pays
    >> any attention enough for its name to be recognised. Its NASA's
    >> number one PR machine as well as one hell of a good science resource.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Thanks for that update. I forgot that there were NASA people hanging
    > out here.
    >
    > p.s. So do you think it's too late for someone like a presidential
    > science advisor to get the USA back on track? In this light it would
    > be nice if we could get back to the 1960's.
    >
    > Neil Rieck
    > Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge,
    > Ontario, Canada.
    > http://www3.sympatico.ca/n.rieck/
    >


    Only after a new president takes office. If Dubya doesn't mastermind
    (giggle) a coup d'etat. . . .


  15. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    In article <474dc024$0$7607$157c6196@dreader2.cybercity.dk>, "Dr. Dweeb" writes:
    >{...snip...}
    >A quick fact check reveals that the US is still the world's largest economy.
    >
    >That being said, the dollar has not been this weak since the 60´s, so maybe
    >the the past is finally going to catch the greenback - but I would not bet
    >on it just yet.
    >
    >As for leadership, you are your own masters when it comes to choosing a
    >leader - choose a good one.


    That ain't happening any time soon I can assure you. Both parties suck
    and their candidates in the running suck even more.


    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    http://tmesis.com/drat.html

  16. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    In article <303adb89-0e85-457b-861e-9ce2618852ea@g30g2000hsb.googlegroups.com>, Neil Rieck writes:
    >{...snip...}
    >And please don't take my comments personally. A few posts back I
    >mentioned a recent American radio program telling how Nixon got rid of
    >the position of "Presidential Science Advisor". This position was
    >created by Eisenhower to kick off the space age but you really have to
    >wonder what was Nixon thinking about when he got rid of it? Apparently
    >it took an act of congress to get the position reinstated but the
    >President is not obliged to take this advice (and I'm convinced that
    >Bush isn't). I'd feel more comfortable with a science + technology
    >president than I would with one who thinks that stem-cell research is
    >a mistake (and I'm no atheist).


    In a recent election in the people's republic of New Jermany (proNJ), a
    referendum to expend close to $.5Billion in *STATE* funds on stem-cell
    research was voted down by a significant margin.

    I am not against the stem-cell research. proNJ has most of the major
    pharmaceutical research in the states, so why must the state fund that
    which, until now, has run fine as commercial enterprise? I may have
    been happy to see the referendum succeed if the proNJ's fiscal house
    wasn't in such a shambles but expending $.5Billion, when the state is
    already so deep into the hole that it may ever crawl out, without ANY
    guarantee that the research would pay off is wrong. The state's con-
    stitution (not that any constitutional rights exist in the USA) says
    that the government can't gamble with tax dollars.



    >And to the person who sent me a private note telling me the American
    >economy is doing just fine I'd just like to say this: In 2003 one
    >Canadian dollar got you 67 American cents. Today the Canadian dollar
    >is worth more than the American dollar (last month it was $1.07 but is
    >closer to $1.01 today). The last time this happened was when the US
    >was spending itself into a deep hole called Vietnam.


    I remember being in Canada before 2000 and the exchange was about US$3
    to CDN$5 then. Back at the beginning of this past summer, I was in
    Montreal. The exchange then was essentially US$1 : CDN$1. Thankfully,
    we were invited there, so I only had to pay for the gas on the drive.
    We topped up in upstate NY to avoid buying gas in Canada. What is the
    price of gas up there?

    --
    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"

    http://tmesis.com/drat.html

  17. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    On Nov 28, 4:14 pm, VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG wrote:
    > In article <474dc024$0$7607$157c6...@dreader2.cybercity.dk>, "Dr. Dweeb" writes:


    [...snip...]

    >
    >
    > >As for leadership, you are your own masters when it comes to choosing a

    > leader - choose a good one.
    >
    > That ain't happening any time soon I can assure you. Both parties suck
    > and their candidates in the running suck even more.
    >


    What happens if Hillary gets in? (BTW, I have no opinion on her one
    way or the other). This means that 2 families, the Bushs and the
    Clintons, will have dominated presidential politics for 24 years.

    IMHO it is always a good idea to keep changing things.

    NSR

  18. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    Neil Rieck wrote:
    > On Nov 28, 2:50 pm, Alfred Falk wrote:
    >
    >>Neil Rieck wrote innews:303adb89-0e85-457b-861e-9ce2618852ea@g30g2000hsb.googlegroups.com:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>And to the person who sent me a private note telling me the American
    >>>economy is doing just fine I'd just like to say this: In 2003 one
    >>>Canadian dollar got you 67 American cents. Today the Canadian dollar
    >>>is worth more than the American dollar (last month it was $1.07 but is
    >>>closer to $1.01 today). The last time this happened was when the US
    >>>was spending itself into a deep hole called Vietnam.

    >>
    >>Your history is a little off, Neil. The Canadian dollar was high though
    >>the 50's, declining somewhat in the early 60's. The "Diefenbuck" pegged
    >>it at US$0.925 in 1962. The Vietnam war was just beginning to ramp up
    >>then.
    >>
    >>--
    >>----------------------------------------------------------------
    >> A L B E R T A Alfred Falk f...@arc.ab.ca
    >>R E S E A R C H Information Systems Dept (780)450-5185
    >> C O U N C I L 250 Karl Clark Road
    >> Edmonton, Alberta, Canadahttp://www.arc.ab.ca/ T6N 1E4http://outside.arc.ab.ca/staff/falk/
    >>

    >
    >
    > I hope you don't think it's like throwing a switch. Vietnam started
    > under Kennedy and ramped up under Johnson. My "memory" of the Canadian
    > dollar being worth more than the US buck was around 1971-72.


    Actually Viet Nam started LONG before that. In World War II, Viet Nam
    was conquered by the Japanese. Toward the end of WW II the Vietnamese
    threw the Japanese out all by themselves. Then France "reconquered"
    French IndoChina (including Viet Nam). Needless to say, the Vietnamese
    were not all thrilled with this. . . .

    This wasn't taught in history class in any of the schools I attended.
    "Modern History" ended in the late 19th century! Most of us were a
    little too young in the 1940's to notice all this. . . .




  19. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    Neil Rieck wrote:
    > On Nov 28, 4:14 pm, VAXman- @SendSpamHere.ORG wrote:
    >
    >>In article <474dc024$0$7607$157c6...@dreader2.cybercity.dk>, "Dr. Dweeb" writes:

    >
    >
    > [...snip...]
    >
    >
    >>
    >>>As for leadership, you are your own masters when it comes to choosing a

    >>
    >>leader - choose a good one.
    >>
    >>That ain't happening any time soon I can assure you. Both parties suck
    >>and their candidates in the running suck even more.
    >>

    >
    >
    > What happens if Hillary gets in? (BTW, I have no opinion on her one
    > way or the other). This means that 2 families, the Bushs and the
    > Clintons, will have dominated presidential politics for 24 years.
    >
    > IMHO it is always a good idea to keep changing things.


    Change for the sake of change has little to recommend it!

    To change things for the better, you have to get a lot of people to
    agree on just what "better" is. Most people will pick "better for me"!



  20. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    Neil Rieck wrote:
    > p.s. So do you think it's too late for someone like a presidential
    > science advisor to get the USA back on track? In this light it would
    > be nice if we could get back to the 1960's.


    That is NASA's current mission as given by the current president of the
    USA. Retire Shuttle and build an Apollo system with the contractors that
    used to do Shuttle with the hopes of going to the moon in 2020.

    Not sure why you would consider it "nice" to go back 40 years in
    technology and design.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 ... LastLast