NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer - VMS

This is a discussion on NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer - VMS ; Bob Koehler wrote: > In article , david20@alpha2.mdx.ac.uk writes: > >>That's the whole point. Currently we have to provide everything from Earth >>against that huge gravity well. Mining on the moon means that materials can be >>sent into Earth orbit ...

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Thread: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

  1. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    Bob Koehler wrote:
    > In article , david20@alpha2.mdx.ac.uk writes:
    >
    >>That's the whole point. Currently we have to provide everything from Earth
    >>against that huge gravity well. Mining on the moon means that materials can be
    >>sent into Earth orbit from the moon cheaply. Yes you first need to get mining
    >>equipment up there so there is an initial startup cost but after that you are
    >>living of the land. I suppose whether it is worth it depends upon whether you
    >>think humanity should just hunker down on Earth and ignore the rest of the
    >>Universe or whether we should be building things in Earth orbit and beyond.

    >
    >
    > I think there will be easier ways to get to Mars than setting up a
    > complete vertical operation to mine the raw materials, build, test,
    > and launch a moon to Mars vehicle on the moon any time in the next
    > 50 to 100 years.
    >
    > I think Henry Ford was one of the few people ever to set up a
    > complete vertical operation. He started from raw materials and built
    > Model Ts. Absolutely hughe operation, and couldn't compete.
    >


    Errrr.... Where are most of Henry Ford's late competitors these days?
    I think GM and Chrysler are still around. Most of the others are long
    forgotten. Their products may be highly collectable but who but a few
    collectors remember? Willys? Studebaker? American Motors? See! Even
    I, have forgotten. . . .



  2. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    In article , koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org (Bob Koehler) writes:
    >In article , david20@alpha2.mdx.ac.uk writes:
    >>
    >> That's the whole point. Currently we have to provide everything from Earth
    >> against that huge gravity well. Mining on the moon means that materials can be
    >> sent into Earth orbit from the moon cheaply. Yes you first need to get mining
    >> equipment up there so there is an initial startup cost but after that you are
    >> living of the land. I suppose whether it is worth it depends upon whether you
    >> think humanity should just hunker down on Earth and ignore the rest of the
    >> Universe or whether we should be building things in Earth orbit and beyond.

    >
    > I think there will be easier ways to get to Mars than setting up a
    > complete vertical operation to mine the raw materials, build, test,
    > and launch a moon to Mars vehicle on the moon any time in the next
    > 50 to 100 years.
    >

    I never suggested that this was required for a manned Mars mission.
    The question asked was what possible reason there could be for men going to the
    moon with the added statement that people living on the moon for long periods
    was infeasible because everything they need would have to be provided from
    Earth.


    David Webb
    Security team leader
    CCSS
    Middlesex University

    > I think Henry Ford was one of the few people ever to set up a
    > complete vertical operation. He started from raw materials and built
    > Model Ts. Absolutely hughe operation, and couldn't compete.
    >


  3. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    In article ,
    koehler@eisner.nospam.encompasserve.org says...
    > In article <49f32980-721c-49bf-aada-1295efbce55d@w40g2000hsb.googlegroups.com>, Neil Rieck writes:
    > But almost everything we do at the Goddard Space Flight Center is
    > science. JPL does most of the deep space missions, GSFC does most
    > of the earth orbiting missions; every other NASA installation (JPL
    > is actually a contractor) has its specialty.
    >
    > So why haven't you heard of the GSFC science missions? Because
    > the Hubble Space Telescope is the only one of them the media pays
    > any attention enough for its name to be recognised. Its NASA's
    > number one PR machine as well as one hell of a good science resource.


    Wired had a nice writeup about how NASA's budget is wasted on all of the
    popular and widely covered space missions instead of used for Earth
    missions.

    The author suggested less funding for something like the Mars missions
    and more on terrestrial research such as the oceans, etc.

  4. Re: NASA gets SGI 2048-core Itanium 2 supercomputer

    In article , David Douthitt writes:
    >
    > Wired had a nice writeup about how NASA's budget is wasted on all of the
    > popular and widely covered space missions instead of used for Earth
    > missions.


    At least half the missions at GSFC are pointed at the Earth. And you
    can't really understand the Earth without looking away from it.

    So Wired can take its flying leap of ignorance.

    > The author suggested less funding for something like the Mars missions
    > and more on terrestrial research such as the oceans, etc.


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