Re: Does anyone here have an 11/60? - VMS

This is a discussion on Re: Does anyone here have an 11/60? - VMS ; They were used as MUMPS machines IIRC back in the Boston area. The problem with the 11/60 was that it pulled a lot of power, used rather low capacity "lard" disk units (RK06/07) and worst of all didn't have 22 ...

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Thread: Re: Does anyone here have an 11/60?

  1. Re: Does anyone here have an 11/60?

    They were used as MUMPS machines IIRC back in the Boston area. The
    problem with the 11/60 was that it pulled a lot of power, used rather
    low capacity "lard" disk units (RK06/07) and worst of all didn't have 22
    bit mode. Thus they were not much more use than say an 11/34a. Although
    they did have supervisor mode; don't remember if they had the dual
    registers. Still, what could you do with that?

    It was a great design; it just didn't go far enough. The little blip
    that DEC did towards microprogramming pretty much fell flat after the
    11/03 WCS and the 11/60 in the 11 line. They continued with the 11/23
    (CIS) and 11/44 (CIS) but that was about it.

    So I can see most of them being junked for being too fat, too slow (not
    11/44 speed), and too limited.

    Chris


    Johnny Billquist wrote:
    > On Fri, 29 Apr 2005, Stuart Brook wrote:
    >
    >
    >>On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 09:12:31 -0700, Ian King wrote:
    >>
    >>> I saw one on eBay a couple of years back. IIRC, it was in Europe
    >>> (so shipping to the States would have been horrendous, which is why
    >>> I didn't try to buy it!) and it went for a fairly high price.
    >>> That's the only one I've seen on the market in the last five years
    >>> or so. -- Ian

    >>
    >>Indeed they are rare beasts.
    >>
    >>I've seen only one since my involvement with DEC systems began in 1971.
    >>
    >>As somebody I know would say
    >>
    >>They're nearly as rare as rocking horse droppings!

    >
    >
    > So the fact that a computer club I'm involved in having had four at the
    > same time a number of years ago is kindof unique?
    >
    > All I have left now is the cards for a complete CPU. Tossed the cabinet
    > like six years ago now. Don't think anyone would be interested in the cost
    > of shipping it from Sweden anyhow... :-)
    >
    > Johnny
    >
    > Johnny Billquist || "I'm on a bus
    > || on a psychedelic trip
    > email: bqt@update.uu.se || Reading murder books
    > pdp is alive! || tryin' to stay hip" - B. Idol
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  2. Re: Does anyone here have an 11/60?

    Christopher Zach wrote:
    > They were used as MUMPS machines IIRC back in the Boston area. The
    > problem with the 11/60 was that it pulled a lot of power, used rather
    > low capacity "lard" disk units (RK06/07) and worst of all didn't have 22
    > bit mode. Thus they were not much more use than say an 11/34a. Although
    > they did have supervisor mode; don't remember if they had the dual
    > registers. Still, what could you do with that?
    >
    > It was a great design; it just didn't go far enough. The little blip
    > that DEC did towards microprogramming pretty much fell flat after the
    > 11/03 WCS and the 11/60 in the 11 line. They continued with the 11/23
    > (CIS) and 11/44 (CIS) but that was about it.
    >
    > So I can see most of them being junked for being too fat, too slow (not
    > 11/44 speed), and too limited.
    >


    They were certainly a 'lame duck'. No ID space, only kernel and user
    modes, single register set, 248Kb real memory (which could be ECC).
    The floating point instruction set was in microcode, with an optional
    (very much faster) FP11-E floating point processor. It did have 2Kb
    cache. The display register is addressable (0177570), but light
    chasers in 7 segement displays pale in comparison with 11/45/50/55/70's

    John

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