Hm, that's funny: I'm definitely not conformist, nor am I sloppy, and I
don't feel underpaid. And I've done realtime systems.

No matter what the human language, you can write sonnets or limericks; no
matter what the computer language, you can write tight, secure code or
sloppy, buggy code. Blaming the language is simply silly.

C has a lot of flexibility, which translates into a lot of power for good
or for evil. Some other languages constrain the programmer, in the name
of "safety", but just like a bicycle with training wheels, there's
something you give up.

'Unsafe' doesn't equate with 'bad' - I have some great power tools that
are incredibly unsafe if used incorrectly. (I have forbidden my wife from
even touching my reciprocating end-cut saw - you can take a leg off with
that monster.) C isn't a friendly, 'safe' language, and in some ways it's
weird many educational institutions still use it for introductory
programming classes; but it's universal, and for the most part it
expresses procedural programming semantics very clearly and directly.

One thing I really like about C, as mentioned by others on this thread, is
that if I need to knock off a quick-and-dirty program to accomplish a
task, C doesn't add a lot of overhead and 'training wheels' (I hate Java
for that reason). If I find that the program I've written is really
useful and I want to reuse it or share it, I rewrite it, with attention to
robustness and security and the like. C *can* do that, or rather, I can
do that in C. (In all fairness, I've been writing C for probably twenty
years.)

Are we done with the "C Language Roast" now? -- Ian

On Wed, 24 Nov 2004, Julian Wolfe wrote:

[snip]
>
> There's the verdict folks, you can either be conformist, sloppy,
> and overpaid or nonconformist, hardcore, and underpaid - and varying
>> From either side will just get you frustrated.

>
> My $0.020983745098327509823745
> Julian
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