manual root encapsulation question - Veritas Volume Manager

This is a discussion on manual root encapsulation question - Veritas Volume Manager ; Hi, I want to encapsulate my root disk, as a last step before reboot, using the vxencap command after configuring the rest of my storage system volumes. Is there a need to use vxconfigd -m disable and vxdctl enable just ...

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Thread: manual root encapsulation question

  1. manual root encapsulation question


    Hi,

    I want to encapsulate my root disk, as a last step before reboot, using the
    vxencap command after configuring the rest of my storage system volumes.

    Is there a need to use vxconfigd -m disable and vxdctl enable just before
    the command?

    Thanks

  2. Re: manual root encapsulation question

    Root Encapsulation is a longer process than you woud think.

    1. Create a private area on the disk to keep Volume Manager information

    Sounds easy, but you need at least 1 cylinder for this, and if
    there is none, then Volume Manager will "borrow" a piece of swap. Great
    potential for people to mess this up.

    2. Create the subdisks (and plexes) around current partitions
    This bit is simple if you've done bit 1. and you know what you're doing.

    3. Create volumes. Sounds simple, but root volume as to have a special
    minor number (0) , otherwise it will not work.

    4. Now comes the tricky bit. You will have to save the old vfstab, put a
    new one in place and put a couple of entries into the /etc/system file
    (assuming this is Solaris)



    So, in short , do vxdiskadm, select the option to do root disk
    encapsulation, sit back, watch it reboot twice and come up in good order



    To answer your questions about vxdctl enable and vxcondifd -m disable.


    vxconfigd is the daemon that holds the Volume Manager configuration in
    memory. You start it with the "vxconfigd" command, and you control it
    (after startup) with the vxdctl command.

    vxconfigd -m disable

    will start the configuration daemon in disabled mode.


    vxdctl enable


    will switch a running vxconfigd into enable mode

    Assaf wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I want to encapsulate my root disk, as a last step before reboot, using the
    > vxencap command after configuring the rest of my storage system volumes.
    >
    > Is there a need to use vxconfigd -m disable and vxdctl enable just before
    > the command?
    >
    > Thanks


  3. Re: manual root encapsulation question


    Me wrote:
    >Root Encapsulation is a longer process than you woud think.
    >
    >1. Create a private area on the disk to keep Volume Manager information
    >
    > Sounds easy, but you need at least 1 cylinder for this, and if
    >there is none, then Volume Manager will "borrow" a piece of swap. Great


    >potential for people to mess this up.
    >
    >2. Create the subdisks (and plexes) around current partitions
    > This bit is simple if you've done bit 1. and you know what you're doing.
    >
    >3. Create volumes. Sounds simple, but root volume as to have a special
    >minor number (0) , otherwise it will not work.
    >
    >4. Now comes the tricky bit. You will have to save the old vfstab, put a


    >new one in place and put a couple of entries into the /etc/system file
    >(assuming this is Solaris)
    >
    >
    >
    >So, in short , do vxdiskadm, select the option to do root disk
    >encapsulation, sit back, watch it reboot twice and come up in good order
    >
    >
    >
    >To answer your questions about vxdctl enable and vxcondifd -m disable.
    >
    >
    >vxconfigd is the daemon that holds the Volume Manager configuration in
    >memory. You start it with the "vxconfigd" command, and you control it
    >(after startup) with the vxdctl command.
    >
    >vxconfigd -m disable
    >
    >will start the configuration daemon in disabled mode.
    >
    >
    >vxdctl enable
    >
    >
    >will switch a running vxconfigd into enable mode
    >
    >Assaf wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I want to encapsulate my root disk, as a last step before reboot, using

    the
    >> vxencap command after configuring the rest of my storage system volumes.
    >>
    >> Is there a need to use vxconfigd -m disable and vxdctl enable just before
    >> the command?
    >>
    >> Thanks



    Thanks for the answer... in my tests, all I did was to run vxencap command
    , reboot the host and everything was fine... I have no problem that my swap
    is a little bit less than the original...

    Is the vxconfigd -m disable (before the vxencap) will be neccasary to assure
    that no configuration change will be available because I'm going to reboot
    the host in a moment?

    one more thing sometime I get return code 0 after the vxencap command but
    the disk wasn't encapsulated... is there a possibilty of old veritas config
    data saved on the disk or somewhere that vxvm recognize? how can I clean
    it from a live root disk?

    Thanks

    Thanks

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