answering "what is this a backup of?" - Veritas Net Backup

This is a discussion on answering "what is this a backup of?" - Veritas Net Backup ; Given a backup id, say "servername_1135293024", how can I find out what "backup selection" it contains (from the command line)? e.g. if a windows server has two drives, I might be interested in knowing which drive's backup is contained in ...

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  1. answering "what is this a backup of?"


    Given a backup id, say "servername_1135293024", how can I find out what "backup
    selection" it contains (from the command line)? e.g. if a windows server
    has two drives, I might be interested in knowing which drive's backup is
    contained in which backup id.

    If there's a quick way to see just one of the files contained in the backup
    id, the backup selection could be inferred.


  2. Re: answering "what is this a backup of?"


    "Jim Freitas" wrote:
    >
    >Given a backup id, say "servername_1135293024", how can I find out what

    "backup
    >selection" it contains (from the command line)? e.g. if a windows server
    >has two drives, I might be interested in knowing which drive's backup is
    >contained in which backup id.
    >
    >If there's a quick way to see just one of the files contained in the backup
    >id, the backup selection could be inferred.
    >


    Note: this is from a UNIX perspective but the ideas are transferrable.

    Given the backup_id, I'd look in

    /usr/openv/netbackup/db/images/servername

    then I'd take the first 4 digits of the timestamp and cd into that directory
    [with 6 zeros appended]:

    /usr/openv/netbackup/db/images/servername/first_4_digits000000

    Then I'd look for the backup with that timestamp [the entries will have the
    policy name, not the server name in front], grab the policy name, then do
    a

    bppllist -policyname

    and grep for INCLUDE. This will show you the paths that the policy is backing
    up.

    Whew!


    Scott

  3. Re: answering "what is this a backup of?"


    wrote:
    >
    >"Jim Freitas" wrote:
    >>
    >>Given a backup id, say "servername_1135293024", how can I find out what

    >"backup
    >>selection" it contains (from the command line)? e.g. if a windows server
    >>has two drives, I might be interested in knowing which drive's backup is
    >>contained in which backup id.
    >>
    >>If there's a quick way to see just one of the files contained in the backup
    >>id, the backup selection could be inferred.
    >>

    >
    >Note: this is from a UNIX perspective but the ideas are transferrable.
    >
    >Given the backup_id, I'd look in
    >
    >/usr/openv/netbackup/db/images/servername
    >
    >then I'd take the first 4 digits of the timestamp and cd into that directory
    >[with 6 zeros appended]:
    >
    >/usr/openv/netbackup/db/images/servername/first_4_digits000000
    >
    >Then I'd look for the backup with that timestamp [the entries will have

    the
    >policy name, not the server name in front], grab the policy name, then do
    >a


    so the purpose of this is just to get the policy name for that backup, right?

    >bppllist -policyname
    >
    >and grep for INCLUDE. This will show you the paths that the policy is backing
    >up.
    >


    Yes, it does; unfortunately not what I'm looking for:

    "INCLUDE ALL_LOCAL_DRIVES"

    Doh!



  4. Re: answering "what is this a backup of?"


    "Jim Freitas" wrote:
    >
    > wrote:
    >>
    >>"Jim Freitas" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>Given a backup id, say "servername_1135293024", how can I find out what

    >>"backup
    >>>selection" it contains (from the command line)?


    Aha... found the undocumented bpflist command:

    bpflist -l -client -ut -option FILESYSTEM_ONLY

    and grab the 10th field of the second line :-)

    The client and timestamp are easily gotten from the backupid. voila!


  5. Re: answering "what is this a backup of?"


    "Jim Freitas" wrote:
    >
    > wrote:
    >>
    >>"Jim Freitas" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>Given a backup id, say "servername_1135293024", how can I find out what

    >>"backup
    >>>selection" it contains (from the command line)? e.g. if a windows server
    >>>has two drives, I might be interested in knowing which drive's backup

    is
    >>>contained in which backup id.
    >>>
    >>>If there's a quick way to see just one of the files contained in the backup
    >>>id, the backup selection could be inferred.
    >>>

    >>
    >>Note: this is from a UNIX perspective but the ideas are transferrable.
    >>
    >>Given the backup_id, I'd look in
    >>
    >>/usr/openv/netbackup/db/images/servername
    >>
    >>then I'd take the first 4 digits of the timestamp and cd into that directory
    >>[with 6 zeros appended]:
    >>
    >>/usr/openv/netbackup/db/images/servername/first_4_digits000000
    >>
    >>Then I'd look for the backup with that timestamp [the entries will have

    >the
    >>policy name, not the server name in front], grab the policy name, then

    do
    >>a

    >
    >so the purpose of this is just to get the policy name for that backup, right?
    >
    >>bppllist -policyname
    >>
    >>and grep for INCLUDE. This will show you the paths that the policy is

    backing
    >>up.
    >>

    >
    >Yes, it does; unfortunately not what I'm looking for:
    >
    >"INCLUDE ALL_LOCAL_DRIVES"
    >
    >Doh!
    >
    >

    Hmm. Then I guess the only thing you can do is find a tape inside the images
    file and do a bpimmedia on that tape to get actual path/file information.

    Or, you could look in the bpbrm log for the day the backup started and you'll
    probably find path info in there also. The only limitation would be how
    long you keep your logs.


    Scott

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