Can't Restore to different bootable Hardware =( - Veritas Backup Exec

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Thread: Can't Restore to different bootable Hardware =(

  1. Can't Restore to different bootable Hardware =(

    My co-worker has spent 1 month and I have spent a full week trying to
    restore to different bootable hardware. We first tried to restore Raid to
    IDE with no luck. After we talked with Veritas for 2 hours they said the
    hardware is too different. Since I didn't have the exact Raid card I grabbed
    a similar Raid card. After many tests, I still could not boot. EVERY RESTORE
    JOB SAYS SUCCESSFULL. But when I boot and hit that black screen with the
    vertical bars the machine either freazes or reboots itself.

    I finally got the same exact card as in one of our servers,. Adaptec 2100S.
    I started the restore and the same thing happened. It said successfull but
    the machine just won't boot. I CAN backup my test server and restore to
    itself with no problem. I also have tried many different full tapes with no
    success.

    Does anyone have any idea about how to restore to different bootable
    hardware? The manual's are wrong (Veritas agree's). I've spent many hours on
    the phone with Veritas and their comments were, "We really don't Support
    different bootable hardware". I have 20 servers and I can not get some of
    this hardware anymore. I'd really don't want to have 20 different servers
    laying around just for backup parts. =(

    As far as hard ware tried, I tried to restore a HP NetServer LH3r to a HP
    NetServer LC 3. They both have Megatrend Raid cards (different model #'s
    and drivers). Most of our server we build ourself. Standard Dual 600 -
    1gig, Adaptec Raid 5. The only major different would be the model of
    Adaptec Raid 5 card. But as I said earlier I tried to restore a Dual 600
    with Adaptec Raid 2100S server to a HP NetServer LC 3 with the same exact
    Raid 5 card and it didn't work. I hope I have not left anything out. Sorry
    for the book.

    OH, and we are restoring 2000 Server. I've tried restoring DC's but now I'm
    just trying to restore a non 2000 DC. Also we've tried almost every
    possible combination, install to a differnt directory then restore, boot to
    directory services restore mode and normal restore...




  2. Re: Can't Restore to different bootable Hardware =(

    deselect all system files from system32\config, boot.ini and also maybe
    HAL.DLL on the restore. Prior to this you need to install first OS and APPL.
    what you really get back is then the data, settings and users.
    "SomeGuy" wrote in message
    news:3aae4b04$1@hronntp01....
    > My co-worker has spent 1 month and I have spent a full week trying to
    > restore to different bootable hardware. We first tried to restore Raid to
    > IDE with no luck. After we talked with Veritas for 2 hours they said the
    > hardware is too different. Since I didn't have the exact Raid card I

    grabbed
    > a similar Raid card. After many tests, I still could not boot. EVERY

    RESTORE
    > JOB SAYS SUCCESSFULL. But when I boot and hit that black screen with the
    > vertical bars the machine either freazes or reboots itself.
    >
    > I finally got the same exact card as in one of our servers,. Adaptec

    2100S.
    > I started the restore and the same thing happened. It said successfull but
    > the machine just won't boot. I CAN backup my test server and restore to
    > itself with no problem. I also have tried many different full tapes with

    no
    > success.
    >
    > Does anyone have any idea about how to restore to different bootable
    > hardware? The manual's are wrong (Veritas agree's). I've spent many hours

    on
    > the phone with Veritas and their comments were, "We really don't Support
    > different bootable hardware". I have 20 servers and I can not get some of
    > this hardware anymore. I'd really don't want to have 20 different servers
    > laying around just for backup parts. =(
    >
    > As far as hard ware tried, I tried to restore a HP NetServer LH3r to a HP
    > NetServer LC 3. They both have Megatrend Raid cards (different model #'s
    > and drivers). Most of our server we build ourself. Standard Dual 600 -
    > 1gig, Adaptec Raid 5. The only major different would be the model of
    > Adaptec Raid 5 card. But as I said earlier I tried to restore a Dual 600
    > with Adaptec Raid 2100S server to a HP NetServer LC 3 with the same exact
    > Raid 5 card and it didn't work. I hope I have not left anything out.

    Sorry
    > for the book.
    >
    > OH, and we are restoring 2000 Server. I've tried restoring DC's but now

    I'm
    > just trying to restore a non 2000 DC. Also we've tried almost every
    > possible combination, install to a differnt directory then restore, boot

    to
    > directory services restore mode and normal restore...
    >
    >
    >




  3. Re: Can't Restore to different bootable Hardware =(

    Actually now I am told by Veritas that I can not restore a dual processor
    system to a single processor system.

    Is this true?


    "B Schultz" wrote in message
    news:3aae5e15$1@hronntp01....
    > deselect all system files from system32\config, boot.ini and also maybe
    > HAL.DLL on the restore. Prior to this you need to install first OS and

    APPL.
    > what you really get back is then the data, settings and users.
    > "SomeGuy" wrote in message
    > news:3aae4b04$1@hronntp01....
    > > My co-worker has spent 1 month and I have spent a full week trying to
    > > restore to different bootable hardware. We first tried to restore Raid

    to
    > > IDE with no luck. After we talked with Veritas for 2 hours they said the
    > > hardware is too different. Since I didn't have the exact Raid card I

    > grabbed
    > > a similar Raid card. After many tests, I still could not boot. EVERY

    > RESTORE
    > > JOB SAYS SUCCESSFULL. But when I boot and hit that black screen with

    the
    > > vertical bars the machine either freazes or reboots itself.
    > >
    > > I finally got the same exact card as in one of our servers,. Adaptec

    > 2100S.
    > > I started the restore and the same thing happened. It said successfull

    but
    > > the machine just won't boot. I CAN backup my test server and restore to
    > > itself with no problem. I also have tried many different full tapes

    with
    > no
    > > success.
    > >
    > > Does anyone have any idea about how to restore to different bootable
    > > hardware? The manual's are wrong (Veritas agree's). I've spent many

    hours
    > on
    > > the phone with Veritas and their comments were, "We really don't Support
    > > different bootable hardware". I have 20 servers and I can not get some

    of
    > > this hardware anymore. I'd really don't want to have 20 different

    servers
    > > laying around just for backup parts. =(
    > >
    > > As far as hard ware tried, I tried to restore a HP NetServer LH3r to a

    HP
    > > NetServer LC 3. They both have Megatrend Raid cards (different model

    #'s
    > > and drivers). Most of our server we build ourself. Standard Dual 600 -
    > > 1gig, Adaptec Raid 5. The only major different would be the model of
    > > Adaptec Raid 5 card. But as I said earlier I tried to restore a Dual

    600
    > > with Adaptec Raid 2100S server to a HP NetServer LC 3 with the same

    exact
    > > Raid 5 card and it didn't work. I hope I have not left anything out.

    > Sorry
    > > for the book.
    > >
    > > OH, and we are restoring 2000 Server. I've tried restoring DC's but now

    > I'm
    > > just trying to restore a non 2000 DC. Also we've tried almost every
    > > possible combination, install to a differnt directory then restore, boot

    > to
    > > directory services restore mode and normal restore...
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    >




  4. Re: Can't Restore to different bootable Hardware =(

    Take a look at Microsoft's knowledge base, document Q139822.

    Charles Villa

    "SomeGuy" wrote in message
    news:3aae4b04$1@hronntp01....
    > My co-worker has spent 1 month and I have spent a full week trying to
    > restore to different bootable hardware. We first tried to restore Raid to
    > IDE with no luck. After we talked with Veritas for 2 hours they said the
    > hardware is too different. Since I didn't have the exact Raid card I

    grabbed
    > a similar Raid card. After many tests, I still could not boot. EVERY

    RESTORE
    > JOB SAYS SUCCESSFULL. But when I boot and hit that black screen with the
    > vertical bars the machine either freazes or reboots itself.
    >
    > I finally got the same exact card as in one of our servers,. Adaptec

    2100S.
    > I started the restore and the same thing happened. It said successfull but
    > the machine just won't boot. I CAN backup my test server and restore to
    > itself with no problem. I also have tried many different full tapes with

    no
    > success.
    >
    > Does anyone have any idea about how to restore to different bootable
    > hardware? The manual's are wrong (Veritas agree's). I've spent many hours

    on
    > the phone with Veritas and their comments were, "We really don't Support
    > different bootable hardware". I have 20 servers and I can not get some of
    > this hardware anymore. I'd really don't want to have 20 different servers
    > laying around just for backup parts. =(
    >
    > As far as hard ware tried, I tried to restore a HP NetServer LH3r to a HP
    > NetServer LC 3. They both have Megatrend Raid cards (different model #'s
    > and drivers). Most of our server we build ourself. Standard Dual 600 -
    > 1gig, Adaptec Raid 5. The only major different would be the model of
    > Adaptec Raid 5 card. But as I said earlier I tried to restore a Dual 600
    > with Adaptec Raid 2100S server to a HP NetServer LC 3 with the same exact
    > Raid 5 card and it didn't work. I hope I have not left anything out.

    Sorry
    > for the book.
    >
    > OH, and we are restoring 2000 Server. I've tried restoring DC's but now

    I'm
    > just trying to restore a non 2000 DC. Also we've tried almost every
    > possible combination, install to a differnt directory then restore, boot

    to
    > directory services restore mode and normal restore...
    >
    >
    >




  5. Re: Can't Restore to different bootable Hardware =(



    Microsoft's knowledge base, document Q139822 article applies to:


    - Microsoft Windows NT Workstation versions 3.5, 3.51, 4.00

    - Microsoft Windows NT Server versions 3.5, 3.51, 4.00



    Not 2000. =(



    "Charles Villa" wrote in message
    news:3aae98ea$1@hronntp01....
    > Take a look at Microsoft's knowledge base, document Q139822.
    >
    > Charles Villa
    >
    > "SomeGuy" wrote in message
    > news:3aae4b04$1@hronntp01....
    > > My co-worker has spent 1 month and I have spent a full week trying to
    > > restore to different bootable hardware. We first tried to restore Raid

    to
    > > IDE with no luck. After we talked with Veritas for 2 hours they said the
    > > hardware is too different. Since I didn't have the exact Raid card I

    > grabbed
    > > a similar Raid card. After many tests, I still could not boot. EVERY

    > RESTORE
    > > JOB SAYS SUCCESSFULL. But when I boot and hit that black screen with

    the
    > > vertical bars the machine either freazes or reboots itself.
    > >
    > > I finally got the same exact card as in one of our servers,. Adaptec

    > 2100S.
    > > I started the restore and the same thing happened. It said successfull

    but
    > > the machine just won't boot. I CAN backup my test server and restore to
    > > itself with no problem. I also have tried many different full tapes

    with
    > no
    > > success.
    > >
    > > Does anyone have any idea about how to restore to different bootable
    > > hardware? The manual's are wrong (Veritas agree's). I've spent many

    hours
    > on
    > > the phone with Veritas and their comments were, "We really don't Support
    > > different bootable hardware". I have 20 servers and I can not get some

    of
    > > this hardware anymore. I'd really don't want to have 20 different

    servers
    > > laying around just for backup parts. =(
    > >
    > > As far as hard ware tried, I tried to restore a HP NetServer LH3r to a

    HP
    > > NetServer LC 3. They both have Megatrend Raid cards (different model

    #'s
    > > and drivers). Most of our server we build ourself. Standard Dual 600 -
    > > 1gig, Adaptec Raid 5. The only major different would be the model of
    > > Adaptec Raid 5 card. But as I said earlier I tried to restore a Dual

    600
    > > with Adaptec Raid 2100S server to a HP NetServer LC 3 with the same

    exact
    > > Raid 5 card and it didn't work. I hope I have not left anything out.

    > Sorry
    > > for the book.
    > >
    > > OH, and we are restoring 2000 Server. I've tried restoring DC's but now

    > I'm
    > > just trying to restore a non 2000 DC. Also we've tried almost every
    > > possible combination, install to a differnt directory then restore, boot

    > to
    > > directory services restore mode and normal restore...
    > >
    > >
    > >

    >
    >




  6. Re: Can't Restore to different bootable Hardware =(

    I found some info on MSDN, but it didn't have a Q number, so I am including
    the entire file here. For this to work, you need the original machine
    available, since this method uses NTBackup. NTBackup looks in the registry
    to find a list of reg keys it shouldn't restore. Maybe NTBackup will read
    the BackupExec format?

    Charles Villa


    How to Move a Windows 2000 Installation to Different Hardware


    The information in this article applies to:

    Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
    Microsoft Windows 2000 Server




    SUMMARY
    This article describes how to move a Windows 2000 installation to new or
    different hardware. You can use the information in this article to migrate a
    working Windows 2000 operating system and installed programs to a different
    or more powerful computer with minimal downtime. You can also use this
    procedure to replace a small system/boot disk drive to a larger system/boot
    disk drive, or to restore a Windows 2000 backup from a non-working computer
    to a different computer for disaster recovery purposes.


    MORE INFORMATION
    Windows 2000 Backup (Ntbackup.exe) has the ability to merge differences in
    hardware configuration information between computers and maintain critical
    registry entries unique to the new computer to which you are restoring
    information. This capability makes it possible to perform a full backup of
    your source computer and restore it on top of a fresh Windows 2000
    installation on your destination computer to migrate to new hardware.

    Ntbackup.exe handles registry restore operations by first querying the
    following registry key:
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Contro l\BackupRestore\KeysNotToR
    estore
    This registry key indicates to Ntbackup.exe that certain registry keys under
    the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM key should not be overwritten at the time of
    restoration.

    An entry ending with a backslash (\) indicates a key that is protected and
    any keys/values below that key should not be restored. If the entry ends
    with a backslash and an asterisk (\*), all subkeys are "merged." In this
    situation, "merged" means looking at the start value of the keys in the
    backup set versus the start value that exists in the current registry to
    determine the proper key to restore.

    If the value of the key on the backup set has a lower start value, it takes
    precedence. If the value of the key in the current registry has a lower
    start value than the key you want to restore, it takes precedence. This
    process ensures that all services and devices start properly after a "system
    state" restoration, even on dissimilar hardware. After the computer is
    successfully restarted, Windows 2000 Plug and Play takes care of any minor
    differences in hardware configuration.
    Things to Consider Before Deciding to Use this Procedure
    Drive Letters and the %SystemRoot% Folder
    For a complete migration to work correctly, the drive letters for any
    (target) volume(s) that contain a system-state component and the
    %SystemRoot% (Winnt) folder must be the same on both the source and
    destination computers. This means that if Windows 2000 on the source
    computer is installed in the C:\Windows folder and has Active Directory
    (NTDS) and SYSVOL on separate D and E drives respectively, the destination
    computer must have Windows 2000 pre-installed in a C:\Windows folder and
    contain drives D and E before the restore operation succeeds. For additional
    information, click the article number below to view the article in the
    Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    Q235478 Recover from Failed System Drive with Non-Default %SystemRoot%
    Directory
    Hardware Abstract Layer (HAL)
    The HALs on both of the computers should be the same. This means both the
    source and destination computers should be using the same HAL types to
    achieve favorable results. Although this is not a requirement, the computer
    may not migrate properly if the HALs do not match. To determine the computer
    HAL type you are using on each computer:
    Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click
    System.


    On the Hardware tab, click Device Manager and view the listing under the
    Computer branch. Possible values for the system description and associated
    HAL include:


    ACPI Multiprocessor PC = Halmacpi.dll
    ACPI Uniprocessor PC = Halaacpi.dll
    Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC = Halacpi.dll
    MPS Multiprocessor PC = Halmps.dll
    MPS Uniprocessor PC = Halapic.dll
    Standard PC = Hal.dll
    Compaq SystemPro Multiprocessor or 100% Compatible = Halsp.dll
    The %SystemRoot%\Repair Folder
    The Winnt\Repair folder containing your original (source computer) hardware
    and software configuration files and the Setup.log file may not be valid for
    the new hardware on the destination computer to which you restored them. You
    should perform an in-place upgrade on the restored (destination) computer to
    update these files so you can make the appropriate repairs in the future if
    needed.
    NTFS Volumes
    You may need to start special filter drivers before you can restore files
    that contain reparse points to NTFS volumes. This means that you need to
    restart the computer after you restore the operating system before you can
    restore these types of files. Examples of these types of files include
    Remote Installation Services (RIS) images that rely on Single Instance
    Storage (SIS), Remote Storage Server (RSS) files that you are restoring to
    managed volumes, or other third-party services that use reparse points and
    require filter drivers.
    Procedure for Moving a Windows 2000 Installation
    On the new (destination) computer, perform a new installation of Windows
    2000 using the same product type that matches the source computer. Ensure
    that the drive letter and %SystemRoot% folder names match those of the
    source computers. If you are using a non-default (Winnt) folder name, please
    refer to the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:


    Q235478 Recovering from Failed System Drive with Non-Default %SystemRoot%
    Folder
    Using Disk Management, create, format, and assign drive letters to any
    additional volumes that may be required to hold a system-state component
    (for example, SYSVOL, Active Directory, or Active Directory Log files).
    Ensure that all drive letters match the source computers.


    On the original (source) computer, log on as Administrator, and stop all
    non-essential services you normally stop before performing a backup.


    Using Ntbackup.exe, back up the system\boot volume, and the system state and
    associated NTDS and SYSVOL volumes, if applicable.


    On the new (destination) computer, log on as Administrator and restore the
    system\boot volume, system state and associated volumes from the backup you
    previously performed. Make sure you select the option to restore them to
    "original location" in the backup program.


    After the full restoration is finished (and before you restart the
    destination computer), ensure the computer is disconnected from the network
    to avoid conflicts.


    Restart the computer. If the computer does not restart after restoration
    because of HAL mismatches, you can start from the Windows 2000 installation
    disk to perform an in-place installation or repair. This type of repair
    occurs after you accept the licensing agreement, and Setup searches for
    previous versions to repair. When the installation that is damaged or needs
    repair is found, press R to repair the selected installation. Setup
    re-enumerates your computer's hardware (including HAL) and performs an
    in-place upgrade while maintaining your programs and user settings. This
    also refreshes the %SystemRoot%\Repair folder with accurate information that
    you can use for normal repairs.

    If the computer does restart after the restoration, log on as Administrator
    and initiate an in-place upgrade by running Winnt32.exe from the I386 folder
    on the Windows 2000 CD-ROM. This refreshes the Setup.log and registry files
    in the %SystemRoot%\Repair folder, and ensures the proper HAL is in use.


    After the upgrade is finished and you are certain that everything works, you
    can remove the original computer from the network and connect the new
    computer in its place.


    NOTE: The difference between the time of the backup and the time of the
    restoration to the new computer may affect the machine account on the domain
    controller. You may have to join a workgroup and then rejoin the domain.

    For additional information, click the article numbers below to view the
    articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    Q162797 Trust Relationship Between Workstation and Domain Fails
    Q240240 Programs Do Not Work After Restoring Computer with Backup
    Q233427 Files and Folders Not Backed Up Using the Ntbackup.exe Tool
    Q237556 Troubleshooting Windows 2000 Hardware Abstraction Layer Issues
    Additional query words: stop 0x79 pnp
    Keywords : kbenv
    Version : WINDOWS:2000
    Platform : WINDOWS
    Issue type : kbhowto
    Technology :

    Last Reviewed: May 3, 2000
    2000 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Terms of Use.




  7. Re: Can't Restore to different bootable Hardware =(

    Great thanks. I'll look into it. =)

    "Charles Villa" wrote in message
    news:3aaeabe4@hronntp01....
    > I found some info on MSDN, but it didn't have a Q number, so I am

    including
    > the entire file here. For this to work, you need the original machine
    > available, since this method uses NTBackup. NTBackup looks in the

    registry
    > to find a list of reg keys it shouldn't restore. Maybe NTBackup will read
    > the BackupExec format?
    >
    > Charles Villa
    >
    >
    > How to Move a Windows 2000 Installation to Different Hardware
    >
    >
    > The information in this article applies to:
    >
    > Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
    > Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > SUMMARY
    > This article describes how to move a Windows 2000 installation to new or
    > different hardware. You can use the information in this article to migrate

    a
    > working Windows 2000 operating system and installed programs to a

    different
    > or more powerful computer with minimal downtime. You can also use this
    > procedure to replace a small system/boot disk drive to a larger

    system/boot
    > disk drive, or to restore a Windows 2000 backup from a non-working

    computer
    > to a different computer for disaster recovery purposes.
    >
    >
    > MORE INFORMATION
    > Windows 2000 Backup (Ntbackup.exe) has the ability to merge differences in
    > hardware configuration information between computers and maintain critical
    > registry entries unique to the new computer to which you are restoring
    > information. This capability makes it possible to perform a full backup of
    > your source computer and restore it on top of a fresh Windows 2000
    > installation on your destination computer to migrate to new hardware.
    >
    > Ntbackup.exe handles registry restore operations by first querying the
    > following registry key:
    >

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Contro l\BackupRestore\KeysNotToR
    > estore
    > This registry key indicates to Ntbackup.exe that certain registry keys

    under
    > the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM key should not be overwritten at the time of
    > restoration.
    >
    > An entry ending with a backslash (\) indicates a key that is protected and
    > any keys/values below that key should not be restored. If the entry ends
    > with a backslash and an asterisk (\*), all subkeys are "merged." In this
    > situation, "merged" means looking at the start value of the keys in the
    > backup set versus the start value that exists in the current registry to
    > determine the proper key to restore.
    >
    > If the value of the key on the backup set has a lower start value, it

    takes
    > precedence. If the value of the key in the current registry has a lower
    > start value than the key you want to restore, it takes precedence. This
    > process ensures that all services and devices start properly after a

    "system
    > state" restoration, even on dissimilar hardware. After the computer is
    > successfully restarted, Windows 2000 Plug and Play takes care of any minor
    > differences in hardware configuration.
    > Things to Consider Before Deciding to Use this Procedure
    > Drive Letters and the %SystemRoot% Folder
    > For a complete migration to work correctly, the drive letters for any
    > (target) volume(s) that contain a system-state component and the
    > %SystemRoot% (Winnt) folder must be the same on both the source and
    > destination computers. This means that if Windows 2000 on the source
    > computer is installed in the C:\Windows folder and has Active Directory
    > (NTDS) and SYSVOL on separate D and E drives respectively, the destination
    > computer must have Windows 2000 pre-installed in a C:\Windows folder and
    > contain drives D and E before the restore operation succeeds. For

    additional
    > information, click the article number below to view the article in the
    > Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    > Q235478 Recover from Failed System Drive with Non-Default %SystemRoot%
    > Directory
    > Hardware Abstract Layer (HAL)
    > The HALs on both of the computers should be the same. This means both the
    > source and destination computers should be using the same HAL types to
    > achieve favorable results. Although this is not a requirement, the

    computer
    > may not migrate properly if the HALs do not match. To determine the

    computer
    > HAL type you are using on each computer:
    > Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click
    > System.
    >
    >
    > On the Hardware tab, click Device Manager and view the listing under the
    > Computer branch. Possible values for the system description and associated
    > HAL include:
    >
    >
    > ACPI Multiprocessor PC = Halmacpi.dll
    > ACPI Uniprocessor PC = Halaacpi.dll
    > Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC = Halacpi.dll
    > MPS Multiprocessor PC = Halmps.dll
    > MPS Uniprocessor PC = Halapic.dll
    > Standard PC = Hal.dll
    > Compaq SystemPro Multiprocessor or 100% Compatible = Halsp.dll
    > The %SystemRoot%\Repair Folder
    > The Winnt\Repair folder containing your original (source computer)

    hardware
    > and software configuration files and the Setup.log file may not be valid

    for
    > the new hardware on the destination computer to which you restored them.

    You
    > should perform an in-place upgrade on the restored (destination) computer

    to
    > update these files so you can make the appropriate repairs in the future

    if
    > needed.
    > NTFS Volumes
    > You may need to start special filter drivers before you can restore files
    > that contain reparse points to NTFS volumes. This means that you need to
    > restart the computer after you restore the operating system before you can
    > restore these types of files. Examples of these types of files include
    > Remote Installation Services (RIS) images that rely on Single Instance
    > Storage (SIS), Remote Storage Server (RSS) files that you are restoring to
    > managed volumes, or other third-party services that use reparse points and
    > require filter drivers.
    > Procedure for Moving a Windows 2000 Installation
    > On the new (destination) computer, perform a new installation of Windows
    > 2000 using the same product type that matches the source computer. Ensure
    > that the drive letter and %SystemRoot% folder names match those of the
    > source computers. If you are using a non-default (Winnt) folder name,

    please
    > refer to the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:
    >
    >
    > Q235478 Recovering from Failed System Drive with Non-Default %SystemRoot%
    > Folder
    > Using Disk Management, create, format, and assign drive letters to any
    > additional volumes that may be required to hold a system-state component
    > (for example, SYSVOL, Active Directory, or Active Directory Log files).
    > Ensure that all drive letters match the source computers.
    >
    >
    > On the original (source) computer, log on as Administrator, and stop all
    > non-essential services you normally stop before performing a backup.
    >
    >
    > Using Ntbackup.exe, back up the system\boot volume, and the system state

    and
    > associated NTDS and SYSVOL volumes, if applicable.
    >
    >
    > On the new (destination) computer, log on as Administrator and restore the
    > system\boot volume, system state and associated volumes from the backup

    you
    > previously performed. Make sure you select the option to restore them to
    > "original location" in the backup program.
    >
    >
    > After the full restoration is finished (and before you restart the
    > destination computer), ensure the computer is disconnected from the

    network
    > to avoid conflicts.
    >
    >
    > Restart the computer. If the computer does not restart after restoration
    > because of HAL mismatches, you can start from the Windows 2000

    installation
    > disk to perform an in-place installation or repair. This type of repair
    > occurs after you accept the licensing agreement, and Setup searches for
    > previous versions to repair. When the installation that is damaged or

    needs
    > repair is found, press R to repair the selected installation. Setup
    > re-enumerates your computer's hardware (including HAL) and performs an
    > in-place upgrade while maintaining your programs and user settings. This
    > also refreshes the %SystemRoot%\Repair folder with accurate information

    that
    > you can use for normal repairs.
    >
    > If the computer does restart after the restoration, log on as

    Administrator
    > and initiate an in-place upgrade by running Winnt32.exe from the I386

    folder
    > on the Windows 2000 CD-ROM. This refreshes the Setup.log and registry

    files
    > in the %SystemRoot%\Repair folder, and ensures the proper HAL is in use.
    >
    >
    > After the upgrade is finished and you are certain that everything works,

    you
    > can remove the original computer from the network and connect the new
    > computer in its place.
    >
    >
    > NOTE: The difference between the time of the backup and the time of the
    > restoration to the new computer may affect the machine account on the

    domain
    > controller. You may have to join a workgroup and then rejoin the domain.
    >
    > For additional information, click the article numbers below to view the
    > articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    > Q162797 Trust Relationship Between Workstation and Domain Fails
    > Q240240 Programs Do Not Work After Restoring Computer with Backup
    > Q233427 Files and Folders Not Backed Up Using the Ntbackup.exe Tool
    > Q237556 Troubleshooting Windows 2000 Hardware Abstraction Layer Issues
    > Additional query words: stop 0x79 pnp
    > Keywords : kbenv
    > Version : WINDOWS:2000
    > Platform : WINDOWS
    > Issue type : kbhowto
    > Technology :
    >
    > Last Reviewed: May 3, 2000
    > 2000 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Terms of Use.
    >
    >
    >




  8. Re: Can't Restore to different bootable Hardware =(

    BE reads writes in MTF which NTBackup will read.
    "Charles Villa" wrote in message
    news:3aaeabe4@hronntp01....
    > I found some info on MSDN, but it didn't have a Q number, so I am

    including
    > the entire file here. For this to work, you need the original machine
    > available, since this method uses NTBackup. NTBackup looks in the

    registry
    > to find a list of reg keys it shouldn't restore. Maybe NTBackup will read
    > the BackupExec format?
    >
    > Charles Villa
    >
    >
    > How to Move a Windows 2000 Installation to Different Hardware
    >
    >
    > The information in this article applies to:
    >
    > Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional
    > Microsoft Windows 2000 Server
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > SUMMARY
    > This article describes how to move a Windows 2000 installation to new or
    > different hardware. You can use the information in this article to migrate

    a
    > working Windows 2000 operating system and installed programs to a

    different
    > or more powerful computer with minimal downtime. You can also use this
    > procedure to replace a small system/boot disk drive to a larger

    system/boot
    > disk drive, or to restore a Windows 2000 backup from a non-working

    computer
    > to a different computer for disaster recovery purposes.
    >
    >
    > MORE INFORMATION
    > Windows 2000 Backup (Ntbackup.exe) has the ability to merge differences in
    > hardware configuration information between computers and maintain critical
    > registry entries unique to the new computer to which you are restoring
    > information. This capability makes it possible to perform a full backup of
    > your source computer and restore it on top of a fresh Windows 2000
    > installation on your destination computer to migrate to new hardware.
    >
    > Ntbackup.exe handles registry restore operations by first querying the
    > following registry key:
    >

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Contro l\BackupRestore\KeysNotToR
    > estore
    > This registry key indicates to Ntbackup.exe that certain registry keys

    under
    > the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM key should not be overwritten at the time of
    > restoration.
    >
    > An entry ending with a backslash (\) indicates a key that is protected and
    > any keys/values below that key should not be restored. If the entry ends
    > with a backslash and an asterisk (\*), all subkeys are "merged." In this
    > situation, "merged" means looking at the start value of the keys in the
    > backup set versus the start value that exists in the current registry to
    > determine the proper key to restore.
    >
    > If the value of the key on the backup set has a lower start value, it

    takes
    > precedence. If the value of the key in the current registry has a lower
    > start value than the key you want to restore, it takes precedence. This
    > process ensures that all services and devices start properly after a

    "system
    > state" restoration, even on dissimilar hardware. After the computer is
    > successfully restarted, Windows 2000 Plug and Play takes care of any minor
    > differences in hardware configuration.
    > Things to Consider Before Deciding to Use this Procedure
    > Drive Letters and the %SystemRoot% Folder
    > For a complete migration to work correctly, the drive letters for any
    > (target) volume(s) that contain a system-state component and the
    > %SystemRoot% (Winnt) folder must be the same on both the source and
    > destination computers. This means that if Windows 2000 on the source
    > computer is installed in the C:\Windows folder and has Active Directory
    > (NTDS) and SYSVOL on separate D and E drives respectively, the destination
    > computer must have Windows 2000 pre-installed in a C:\Windows folder and
    > contain drives D and E before the restore operation succeeds. For

    additional
    > information, click the article number below to view the article in the
    > Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    > Q235478 Recover from Failed System Drive with Non-Default %SystemRoot%
    > Directory
    > Hardware Abstract Layer (HAL)
    > The HALs on both of the computers should be the same. This means both the
    > source and destination computers should be using the same HAL types to
    > achieve favorable results. Although this is not a requirement, the

    computer
    > may not migrate properly if the HALs do not match. To determine the

    computer
    > HAL type you are using on each computer:
    > Click Start, point to Settings, click Control Panel, and then double-click
    > System.
    >
    >
    > On the Hardware tab, click Device Manager and view the listing under the
    > Computer branch. Possible values for the system description and associated
    > HAL include:
    >
    >
    > ACPI Multiprocessor PC = Halmacpi.dll
    > ACPI Uniprocessor PC = Halaacpi.dll
    > Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) PC = Halacpi.dll
    > MPS Multiprocessor PC = Halmps.dll
    > MPS Uniprocessor PC = Halapic.dll
    > Standard PC = Hal.dll
    > Compaq SystemPro Multiprocessor or 100% Compatible = Halsp.dll
    > The %SystemRoot%\Repair Folder
    > The Winnt\Repair folder containing your original (source computer)

    hardware
    > and software configuration files and the Setup.log file may not be valid

    for
    > the new hardware on the destination computer to which you restored them.

    You
    > should perform an in-place upgrade on the restored (destination) computer

    to
    > update these files so you can make the appropriate repairs in the future

    if
    > needed.
    > NTFS Volumes
    > You may need to start special filter drivers before you can restore files
    > that contain reparse points to NTFS volumes. This means that you need to
    > restart the computer after you restore the operating system before you can
    > restore these types of files. Examples of these types of files include
    > Remote Installation Services (RIS) images that rely on Single Instance
    > Storage (SIS), Remote Storage Server (RSS) files that you are restoring to
    > managed volumes, or other third-party services that use reparse points and
    > require filter drivers.
    > Procedure for Moving a Windows 2000 Installation
    > On the new (destination) computer, perform a new installation of Windows
    > 2000 using the same product type that matches the source computer. Ensure
    > that the drive letter and %SystemRoot% folder names match those of the
    > source computers. If you are using a non-default (Winnt) folder name,

    please
    > refer to the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:
    >
    >
    > Q235478 Recovering from Failed System Drive with Non-Default %SystemRoot%
    > Folder
    > Using Disk Management, create, format, and assign drive letters to any
    > additional volumes that may be required to hold a system-state component
    > (for example, SYSVOL, Active Directory, or Active Directory Log files).
    > Ensure that all drive letters match the source computers.
    >
    >
    > On the original (source) computer, log on as Administrator, and stop all
    > non-essential services you normally stop before performing a backup.
    >
    >
    > Using Ntbackup.exe, back up the system\boot volume, and the system state

    and
    > associated NTDS and SYSVOL volumes, if applicable.
    >
    >
    > On the new (destination) computer, log on as Administrator and restore the
    > system\boot volume, system state and associated volumes from the backup

    you
    > previously performed. Make sure you select the option to restore them to
    > "original location" in the backup program.
    >
    >
    > After the full restoration is finished (and before you restart the
    > destination computer), ensure the computer is disconnected from the

    network
    > to avoid conflicts.
    >
    >
    > Restart the computer. If the computer does not restart after restoration
    > because of HAL mismatches, you can start from the Windows 2000

    installation
    > disk to perform an in-place installation or repair. This type of repair
    > occurs after you accept the licensing agreement, and Setup searches for
    > previous versions to repair. When the installation that is damaged or

    needs
    > repair is found, press R to repair the selected installation. Setup
    > re-enumerates your computer's hardware (including HAL) and performs an
    > in-place upgrade while maintaining your programs and user settings. This
    > also refreshes the %SystemRoot%\Repair folder with accurate information

    that
    > you can use for normal repairs.
    >
    > If the computer does restart after the restoration, log on as

    Administrator
    > and initiate an in-place upgrade by running Winnt32.exe from the I386

    folder
    > on the Windows 2000 CD-ROM. This refreshes the Setup.log and registry

    files
    > in the %SystemRoot%\Repair folder, and ensures the proper HAL is in use.
    >
    >
    > After the upgrade is finished and you are certain that everything works,

    you
    > can remove the original computer from the network and connect the new
    > computer in its place.
    >
    >
    > NOTE: The difference between the time of the backup and the time of the
    > restoration to the new computer may affect the machine account on the

    domain
    > controller. You may have to join a workgroup and then rejoin the domain.
    >
    > For additional information, click the article numbers below to view the
    > articles in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
    > Q162797 Trust Relationship Between Workstation and Domain Fails
    > Q240240 Programs Do Not Work After Restoring Computer with Backup
    > Q233427 Files and Folders Not Backed Up Using the Ntbackup.exe Tool
    > Q237556 Troubleshooting Windows 2000 Hardware Abstraction Layer Issues
    > Additional query words: stop 0x79 pnp
    > Keywords : kbenv
    > Version : WINDOWS:2000
    > Platform : WINDOWS
    > Issue type : kbhowto
    > Technology :
    >
    > Last Reviewed: May 3, 2000
    > 2000 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Terms of Use.
    >
    >
    >




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