Changing the login shell - Unix

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Thread: Changing the login shell

  1. Changing the login shell

    How can a user change his login shell, for example, from csh to ksh
    without the privilege to modify the entry in /etc/passwd.


  2. Re: Changing the login shell

    On May 6, 6:24 pm, "lovecreatesbea...@gmail.com"
    wrote:
    > How can a user change his login shell, for example, from csh to ksh
    > without the privilege to modify the entry in /etc/passwd.


    I just find that chsh does the job. Thanks.


  3. Re: Changing the login shell

    lovecreatesbea...@gmail.com wrote:
    > On May 6, 6:24 pm, "lovecreatesbea...@gmail.com"
    > wrote:
    > > How can a user change his login shell, for example, from csh to ksh
    > > without the privilege to modify the entry in /etc/passwd.


    > I just find that chsh does the job. Thanks.


    Should you find that you want to change it anyway use the
    'chsh' command. The only restriction is that the new shell
    must be listed in /etc/shells.
    Regards, Jens
    --
    \ Jens Thoms Toerring ___ jt@toerring.de
    \__________________________ http://toerring.de

  4. Re: Changing the login shell

    On May 6, 7:54 pm, j...@toerring.de (Jens Thoms Toerring) wrote:
    > lovecreatesbea...@gmail.com wrote:
    > > On May 6, 6:24 pm, "lovecreatesbea...@gmail.com"
    > > wrote:
    > > > How can a user change his login shell, for example, from csh to ksh
    > > > without the privilege to modify the entry in /etc/passwd.

    > > I just find that chsh does the job. Thanks.

    >
    > Should you find that you want to change it anyway use the
    > 'chsh' command.


    sorry, I don't understand what you meant.

    I registered a free account at cyberspace.org. That is a OpenBSD
    machine and the default login shell is csh. The csh doesn't have
    historical command and auto-completion feature.

    > The only restriction is that the new shell
    > must be listed in /etc/shells.


    The manual on chsh says that chsh works on standard shells that listed
    in /etc/shells. But if I don't have the privilege to modify the /etc/
    passwd and the destination shell isn't a standard one, should I send
    the administrator an email for that purpose and ask him to change my
    login shell?


  5. Re: Changing the login shell

    In article <1178462519.104491.188180@l77g2000hsb.googlegroups. com>,
    "lovecreatesbea...@gmail.com" wrote:

    > On May 6, 7:54 pm, j...@toerring.de (Jens Thoms Toerring) wrote:
    > > The only restriction is that the new shell
    > > must be listed in /etc/shells.

    >
    > The manual on chsh says that chsh works on standard shells that listed
    > in /etc/shells. But if I don't have the privilege to modify the /etc/
    > passwd and the destination shell isn't a standard one, should I send
    > the administrator an email for that purpose and ask him to change my
    > login shell?


    Yes, if the shell you want isn't in that list, only an administrator can
    set enable that shell. If it's something that lots of users are likely
    to use, they can add it to /etc/shells to make it generally available;
    otherwise, they can just configure it for your account.

    --
    Barry Margolin, barmar@alum.mit.edu
    Arlington, MA
    *** PLEASE post questions in newsgroups, not directly to me ***
    *** PLEASE don't copy me on replies, I'll read them in the group ***

  6. Re: Changing the login shell

    On May 6, 11:03 pm, Barry Margolin wrote:
    > In article <1178462519.104491.188...@l77g2000hsb.googlegroups. com>,
    >
    > "lovecreatesbea...@gmail.com" wrote:
    > > On May 6, 7:54 pm, j...@toerring.de (Jens Thoms Toerring) wrote:
    > > > The only restriction is that the new shell
    > > > must be listed in /etc/shells.

    >
    > > The manual on chsh says that chsh works on standard shells that listed
    > > in /etc/shells. But if I don't have the privilege to modify the /etc/
    > > passwd and the destination shell isn't a standard one, should I send
    > > the administrator an email for that purpose and ask him to change my
    > > login shell?

    >
    > Yes, if the shell you want isn't in that list, only an administrator can
    > set enable that shell. If it's something that lots of users are likely
    > to use, they can add it to /etc/shells to make it generally available;
    > otherwise, they can just configure it for your account.


    Thans for the confirmation.


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