How to mount network drive while not super user - Unix

This is a discussion on How to mount network drive while not super user - Unix ; I'd like to access files on a remote unix system from another unix system. In Windows I can easily map network drives on separate unix systems, but in unix I must be a super user to mount another file system. ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: How to mount network drive while not super user

  1. How to mount network drive while not super user

    I'd like to access files on a remote unix system from another unix
    system. In Windows I can easily map network drives on separate unix
    systems, but in unix I must be a super user to mount another file
    system. Is there any way for a "non-super-user" to mount a remote file
    system in unix?

  2. Re: How to mount network drive while not super user

    "Tyler A. Davis" writes:
    >I'd like to access files on a remote unix system from another unix
    >system. In Windows I can easily map network drives on separate unix
    >systems, but in unix I must be a super user to mount another file
    >system. Is there any way for a "non-super-user" to mount a remote file
    >system in unix?


    The automounter depending on which unix you are using. It might
    need some setup as root depending on which technology you mean by
    "remote file system" on unix, or it might be all set to go out of the box.



  3. Re: How to mount network drive while not super user

    On 2005-12-03, Bill Marcum wrote:
    > On Fri, 02 Dec 2005 16:45:40 -0500, Tyler A. Davis
    > wrote:
    >> . In Windows I can easily map network drives on separate unix
    >> systems, but in unix I must be a super user to mount another file
    >> system.

    >
    > Set up a line in /etc/fstab with the "user" or "users" option.


    Which only gets you halfway there. This will let a user mount and
    unmount a specific remote share or device on a specific mountpoint on
    the local filesystem.

    What Windows and Mac OS X users have is the ability to mount
    multiple, *arbitrary* remote shares on local mountpoints. I haven't
    yet seen a graceful implementation of this under Linux.

    -- Lars

    --
    Lars Kellogg-Stedman <8273grkci8q8kgt@jetable.net>
    This email address will expire on 2005-11-23.


  4. Re: How to mount network drive while not super user

    Lars Kellogg-Stedman wrote:
    > On 2005-12-03, Bill Marcum wrote:
    >> On Fri, 02 Dec 2005 16:45:40 -0500, Tyler A. Davis
    >> wrote:
    >>> . In Windows I can easily map network drives on separate unix
    >>> systems, but in unix I must be a super user to mount another file
    >>> system.

    >> Set up a line in /etc/fstab with the "user" or "users" option.

    >
    > Which only gets you halfway there. This will let a user mount and
    > unmount a specific remote share or device on a specific mountpoint on
    > the local filesystem.
    >
    > What Windows and Mac OS X users have is the ability to mount
    > multiple, *arbitrary* remote shares on local mountpoints. I haven't
    > yet seen a graceful implementation of this under Linux.
    >
    > -- Lars
    >


    Thanks for the input everybody!

    Tyler

  5. Re: How to mount network drive while not super user

    Tyler A. Davis wrote:
    > Lars Kellogg-Stedman wrote:
    >
    >> On 2005-12-03, Bill Marcum wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Fri, 02 Dec 2005 16:45:40 -0500, Tyler A. Davis
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> . In Windows I can easily map network drives on separate unix
    >>>> systems, but in unix I must be a super user to mount another file
    >>>> system.
    >>>
    >>> Set up a line in /etc/fstab with the "user" or "users" option.

    >>
    >>
    >> Which only gets you halfway there. This will let a user mount and
    >> unmount a specific remote share or device on a specific mountpoint on
    >> the local filesystem.
    >>
    >> What Windows and Mac OS X users have is the ability to mount
    >> multiple, *arbitrary* remote shares on local mountpoints. I haven't
    >> yet seen a graceful implementation of this under Linux.
    >>


    Maybe because it is not needed.
    Either everyone has got root rights, and mounts the things herself,
    or the administrator provides a central automount structure that
    automatically mounts an available share at a well-defined location.

    Nevertheless, Solaris and HPUX have the
    /net -hosts
    automount map, that does a sort of "showmount -e host" browsing
    plus automounting.
    Provided /net/host/share is everywhere the well-defined location, it
    will work as well as the administered automount structure.
    Certainly Linux will go this way.

    --
    Michael Tosch @ hp : com

+ Reply to Thread