New to Unix - Unix

This is a discussion on New to Unix - Unix ; Hi, I imagine that this question was asked a million times... I would like to learn (as much as possible) about Unix. Where do I start? What would be the best Unix System for me to start with? I am ...

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  1. New to Unix

    Hi,
    I imagine that this question was asked a million times...
    I would like to learn (as much as possible) about Unix.
    Where do I start? What would be the best Unix System for me to start
    with? I am a many years Windows user and would like to get away from
    MS...
    Can anyone help?
    Thanks in advance.
    Regards,

    Neb

    --


  2. Re: New to Unix

    Begin
    On 2005-10-22, Neb wrote:
    > I imagine that this question was asked a million times...
    > I would like to learn (as much as possible) about Unix.
    > Where do I start?


    A good book.

    For example, I heard good things about:

    http://www.ora.com/catalog/lunix5

    Do remember that unices are extremely powerful tools that lack a lot of
    the padding (of the kind found in padded rooms) that windows features.
    So you do need to invest a bit in knowning how it works. Installing it
    for the first time may not be as easy as installing windows.


    > What would be the best Unix System for me to start
    > with? I am a many years Windows user and would like to get away from
    > MS...


    I could mention widely used unix-like[1] systems that can be had for
    free[2], but which one is best for you I will leave as an excercise.

    Technically, linux in itself is not a complete OS, but many people have
    packed it up with all the tools you need it to make it more or less
    complete, and this is called a ``linux distribution''. The ubuntu and
    gentoo distributions seem to be widely popular, lately. If you like
    windows-like installation menus fedora (previously redhat) or suse might
    suit your tastes better, but you said you wanted to get away from that.

    Not as widely known as linux are the descendants of BSD, to wit:
    FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD. These are true un*x derived OSen whereas
    linux is rewritten from scratch. The results are high-quality and
    stable software. FreeBSD is what I use for my daily workhorse, altough
    the others I have used and on occasion still do use. The differences
    between the three on intel hardware are mostly a taste issue, but
    especially NetBSD supports a much wider range of hardware, from old
    VAXen through suns, macintoshes and acorns to embedded systems and pdas.
    FreeBSD/i386 and NetBSD/i386 can also run linux/i386 binaries if you add
    the apropriate libraries, making things like skype and acrobat reader
    also available. I would recommend FreeBSD for an easy start, as it has
    the largest collection of applications (``ports'') of the three, and
    high quality documentation.


    [1] Technical term, has to do with ``unix'' being a trademark.
    [2] Downloaded off the internet. If you want it on CD either download
    iso images and burn, or buy a cd-set, which at least in the *BSD
    cases includes a small donation to the volunteer project that
    maintains the OS.

    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .

  3. Re: New to Unix


    Neb wrote:
    > Hi,
    > I imagine that this question was asked a million times...
    > I would like to learn (as much as possible) about Unix.
    > Where do I start? What would be the best Unix System for me to start
    > with? I am a many years Windows user and would like to get away from
    > MS...
    > Can anyone help?
    > Thanks in advance.
    > Regards,
    >
    > Neb
    >
    > --


    Hello, start with cygwin.

    Google for some 'unix basics' or 'unix tutorial'.

    When you're comfortable with both above install linux.


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