idle time tasks? - Unix

This is a discussion on idle time tasks? - Unix ; In 'idle' state, I could see that our SunFire/Solaris server consumes 2% of CPU most of the times. Before checking further about it in the Application code, I would like to know whether the OS/Firmware does something continuously in the ...

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  1. idle time tasks?

    In 'idle' state, I could see that our SunFire/Solaris server consumes
    2% of CPU most of the times. Before checking further about it in the
    Application code, I would like to know whether the OS/Firmware does
    something continuously in the background.

    Can somebody clarify?


  2. Re: idle time tasks?

    On 19 avr, 13:03, qazmlp1...@rediffmail.com wrote:
    > In 'idle' state, I could see that our SunFire/Solaris server consumes
    > 2% of CPU most of the times. Before checking further about it in the
    > Application code, I would like to know whether the OS/Firmware does
    > something continuously in the background.
    >
    > Can somebody clarify?


    you could try a
    top -s

    the -s show the system tasks, there are a few to run.
    Zoot


  3. Re: idle time tasks?

    On Apr 19, 5:09 pm, zoot wrote:
    > On 19 avr, 13:03, qazmlp1...@rediffmail.com wrote:
    >
    > > In 'idle' state, I could see that our SunFire/Solaris server consumes
    > > 2% of CPU most of the times. Before checking further about it in the
    > > Application code, I would like to know whether the OS/Firmware does
    > > something continuously in the background.

    >
    > > Can somebody clarify?

    >
    > you could try a
    > top -s
    >
    > the -s show the system tasks, there are a few to run.
    > Zoot


    top -S works. But, it displayes both the system and the user
    processes.

    How do I make it such that it displays only the system processes?



  4. Re: idle time tasks?

    On 19 avr, 15:18, qazmlp1...@rediffmail.com wrote:
    > On Apr 19, 5:09 pm, zoot wrote:
    >
    > > On 19 avr, 13:03, qazmlp1...@rediffmail.com wrote:

    >
    > > > In 'idle' state, I could see that our SunFire/Solaris server consumes
    > > > 2% of CPU most of the times. Before checking further about it in the
    > > > Application code, I would like to know whether the OS/Firmware does
    > > > something continuously in the background.

    >
    > > > Can somebody clarify?

    >
    > > you could try a
    > > top -s

    >
    > > the -s show the system tasks, there are a few to run.
    > > Zoot

    >
    > top -S works. But, it displayes both the system and the user
    > processes.
    >
    > How do I make it such that it displays only the system processes?


    top show the most demanding process on the system, I don't think there
    is a way to only show system process and it's not the purpose of top.
    Zoot


  5. Re: idle time tasks?

    On Apr 19, 2:18 pm, qazmlp1...@rediffmail.com wrote:
    > On Apr 19, 5:09 pm, zoot wrote:


    > top -S works. But, it displayes both the system and the user
    > processes.
    >
    > How do I make it such that it displays only the system processes?


    prstat -a -s cpu is a reasonably good way of finding the top CPU-time
    consumers, with a summary by UID. You can further filter by UID:
    prstat -a -s cpu -u root,daemon,lp say.

    A system process is no different than a user process other than it is
    typically running as a UID thought of as a system user.

    --tim

    --tim


  6. Re: idle time tasks?

    qazmlp1209@rediffmail.com wrote:
    > In 'idle' state, I could see that our SunFire/Solaris server consumes
    > 2% of CPU most of the times. Before checking further about it in the
    > Application code, I would like to know whether the OS/Firmware does
    > something continuously in the background.


    I believe the Solaris kernel does "memory scrubbing" in the background
    on machines that have ECC memory.

    The idea is that you cannot detect a flipped bit (due to radiation,
    hardware issues, whatever) in RAM until you access that location.
    Once a flipped bit has occurred, you lose redundancy. Should
    another bit flip, you would then lose the ability to correct the
    error.

    The more frequently a memory location is accessed, the lower the
    probability that this compounding of one error upon another will
    happen. So the idea behind memory scrubbing is to ensure that
    every memory location is accessed every now and then.

    I'm not positive that this is the issue (and it seems like 2% of
    the CPU is too much), but it is one thing that Solaris does
    continuously in the background. Here's a useful link on the
    subject:

    http://www.dbforums.com/archive/index.php/t-964093.html

    (That's a thread from comp.unix.solaris, a thread which I just
    realized I had participated in. Maybe that's where I originally
    heard of memory scrubbing. :-)

    - Logan

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