[Sociology] When Unix was born... - Unix

This is a discussion on [Sociology] When Unix was born... - Unix ; Hello, I am a researcher in sociology at the University of Technology in Troyes (Champagne, France). My research field is concerned with the culture of computer programmers. This is why I am searching for references on the early ages of ...

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  1. [Sociology] When Unix was born...



    Hello,

    I am a researcher in sociology at the University of Technology in Troyes
    (Champagne, France). My research field is concerned with the culture of
    computer programmers. This is why I am searching for references on the
    early ages of Multics and Unix.

    In particular, I have precise questions about issues related to the
    filesystem and the operating system.

    1. I am wondering when (and in which circumstances) the symbolic links
    have been conceived (and implemented).

    2. I have a similar question about hierarchical file systems. In his
    great book about Operating System, Andrew Tanenbaum seems to indicate
    that the first directories where designed in order to separated files
    owned by each user of the system.

    Would someone have additionnal information about the circumstances of
    these founding inventions ?

    Don't hesitate to give me your opinion or references such as technical
    and/or scientifical publications... or to advise me to contact somebody
    that could help me in my query.

    I thank you very much in advance for your help.

    Christophe Lejeune
    --
    PhD in Sociology
    University of Troyes (France)
    http://www.smess.egss.ulg.ac.be/lejeune/

  2. Re: [Sociology] When Unix was born...

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    Christophe Lejeune wrote:
    >
    > Hello,
    >
    > I am a researcher in sociology at the University of Technology in Troyes
    > (Champagne, France). My research field is concerned with the culture of
    > computer programmers. This is why I am searching for references on the
    > early ages of Multics and Unix.
    >
    > In particular, I have precise questions about issues related to the
    > filesystem and the operating system.
    >
    > 1. I am wondering when (and in which circumstances) the symbolic links
    > have been conceived (and implemented).
    >
    > 2. I have a similar question about hierarchical file systems. In his
    > great book about Operating System, Andrew Tanenbaum seems to indicate
    > that the first directories where designed in order to separated files
    > owned by each user of the system.
    >
    > Would someone have additionnal information about the circumstances of
    > these founding inventions ?



    Have you seen "The Creation of the UNIX* Operating System" at
    http://www.bell-labs.com/history/unix/ and Dennis Ritchie's homepage at
    http://www.cs.bell-labs.com/who/dmr/ ? Have you looked through The Unix
    Historical Society's web page at http://www.tuhs.org/ ?

    These might answer a few of your questions for you.


    - --

    Lew Pitcher, IT Specialist, Corporate Technology Solutions,
    Enterprise Technology Solutions, TD Bank Financial Group

    (Opinions expressed here are my own, not my employer's)
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  3. Re: When Unix was born...

    The creators of Unix worked previously on a system called Multics.
    See http://www.multicians.org/ for more information.
    Specifically, Multics provided both symbolic links and a hierarchical
    file system.
    The creators of Unix and the other designers of Multics used a system
    called CTSS running at MIT to build Multics. For more information on
    CTSS, read
    http://www.multicians.org/thvv/7094.html
    CTSS provided symbolic links and a disk file directory for each user,
    plus common file directories shared by all on a project, and some
    directories shared by all users on the system, but the hierarchy was
    not user extensible.


  4. Re: When Unix was born...

    In article <1140048821.467414.234300@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups. com>,
    thvv wrote:
    >Specifically, Multics provided both symbolic links and a hierarchical
    >file system.


    But symbolic links were not added to unix until 4.2BSD in around 1983.

    -- Richard

  5. Re: When Unix was born...

    hello,.Christophe,very gald to know you at this website,i'n Jody,from
    China,twenty years olds,perhaps i can't help you,but can i make friend
    with you??wait for you reply,
    at jody@rodintech.com


  6. Re: When Unix was born...


    Hello,

    Sorry not to have answered more quickly.

    I am very thankfull to Lew Pitcher and Tom Van Vleck for the
    references. I have widely read the provided documents (but not
    everything yet). I still haven't spotted in which circumstances the
    hierarchical file systems were founded (I mean what the designers'
    purposes when they create it). But I keep searching :-)

    Thank you very much also to Richard Tobin. He confirms informations
    that I had : symbolic links were "officially" introduced in 1983
    (4.2BSD). But it seems this functionnality was already available for
    some in 1982. Here again, I will be very interested in testimonies
    about (a) the reasons why symbolic links were introduced - or (b)
    problems that symlinks were aimed to solve.

    Again, thank you very much for the help !

    Christophe


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