How to install Unix apps on my ibook? - Unix

This is a discussion on How to install Unix apps on my ibook? - Unix ; Can I install Pine or Ircii on my ibook running OSX Tiger? If so how? Thanks, John -- Col. 3:16 Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom, and ...

+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

  1. How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    Can I install Pine or Ircii on my ibook running OSX Tiger? If so how?

    Thanks,


    John
    --
    Col. 3:16 Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly as you
    teach and admonish one another with all wisdom, and as you sing
    psalms, hymns and spiritual songs with gratitude in your hearts to God.
    CERM-Church Education Resource Ministries
    http://johnw.freeshell.org/bible/

    ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
    http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+ Newsgroups
    ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption =----

  2. Re: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    John the Baptist Jr. wrote:
    > Can I install Pine or Ircii on my ibook running OSX Tiger? If so how?


    Use fink, the installation program. It's text-based. You can also
    install the nice GUI for it: FinkCommander. Get it from
    www.versiontracker.com. Just type "pine" or "ircii" in FinkCommander
    and install. It's all there.

    Markus

  3. Re: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    ["Followup-To:" header set to comp.sys.mac.system.]
    On 2006-01-26, Markus Dehmann wrote:
    > John the Baptist Jr. wrote:
    >> Can I install Pine or Ircii on my ibook running OSX Tiger? If so how?

    >
    > Use fink, the installation program. It's text-based. You can also
    > install the nice GUI for it: FinkCommander. Get it from
    > www.versiontracker.com. Just type "pine" or "ircii" in FinkCommander
    > and install. It's all there.


    I used to use fink but switched to DarwinPorts for various reasons:

    http://www.zenatode.org.uk/ian/macosx/porting.html

    Both pine and ircii are available through DarwinPorts. Personally
    I would go for mutt and irssi instead, both of which are available
    in standard versions and (unlike pine and ircii) aquafied versions.
    I run these two apps on a Debian server which I ssh to from my iBook
    so I have not bothered installing them locally.

    For instant messaging on Mac OS X lots of people recommend [Adium][1]
    but I just checked and it seems that Adium does not do IRC - instead
    they recommend [Colloquy][2] - A Mac OS X Internet Chat client.

    [1]: http://www.adiumx.com/
    [2]: http://colloquy.info/

    --
    Ian Gregory
    http://www.zenatode.org.uk/ian/

  4. Re: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    In article <43s9oqF1pnrmrU2@individual.net>,
    Markus Dehmann wrote:

    > Use fink, the installation program. It's text-based. You can also
    > install the nice GUI for it: FinkCommander. Get it from
    > www.versiontracker.com. Just type "pine" or "ircii" in FinkCommander
    > and install. It's all there.


    Fink is overkill. All the Bible Boy wants is Pine. Fink is 20 megs, and
    isn't totally up-to-date with the latest XCode. Pine is available here:
    http://www.washington.edu/pine/ and is only 3 megs. Download the Unix
    file pine/pine.tar.bz2 and unpack it somewhere so like:

    tar jxvf pine.tar.bz2
    cd pine4.64
    ../build osx

    and Bob will likely be your uncle. Read the install instructions, though.

    ircii is available here, only 6 megs _unpacked_:

    ftp://ircii.warped.com/pub/ircII/ircii-current

    and it's even easier

    tar jxvf ircii.tar.bz2
    cd ircii
    ../configure && make

    I don't understand fink, the need for a kind of shadow subsystem ...
    --
    W. Oates
    Teal'c: He is concealing something.
    O'Neil: What is it?
    Teal'c: I do not know, he is concealing it.

  5. Re: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    In article ,
    Warren Oates wrote:

    > Pine is available here:
    > http://www.washington.edu/pine/ and is only 3 megs. Download the Unix
    > file pine/pine.tar.bz2 and unpack it somewhere so like:


    And where the system likes it. :-)

    If you want a system-wide installation, you can put the sources in
    /usr/local/src, putting the compiled binary in /usr/local/bin, making sure
    that PATH contains this directory. An alternative is to compile it in your
    home directory.

    --
    Hans Aberg

  6. Re: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    haberg@math.su.se (Hans Aberg) writes:

    > If you want a system-wide installation, you can put the sources in
    > /usr/local/src, putting the compiled binary in /usr/local/bin, making sure
    > that PATH contains this directory. An alternative is to compile it in your
    > home directory.


    There's nothing wrong with always compiling it in your home directory
    and then install it where it belongs. "./configure && make && sudo make
    install"...


    Jochem

    --
    "A designer knows he has arrived at perfection not when there is no
    longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away."
    - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. Re: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    In article , Jochem Huhmann
    wrote:

    > > If you want a system-wide installation, you can put the sources in
    > > /usr/local/src, putting the compiled binary in /usr/local/bin, making sure
    > > that PATH contains this directory. An alternative is to compile it in your
    > > home directory.

    >
    > There's nothing wrong with always compiling it in your home directory
    > and then install it where it belongs. "./configure && make && sudo make
    > install"...


    I often compile in the home directory first, to check it works. I then put
    the stuff in ~/local/, to avoid the home directory being cluttered with
    files at the root level. Then the environment variable $PATH should
    include $HOME/local/bin (first in the searchpath). One can set them in the
    files '.profile' (for login shells such as Terminal) and '.bashrc' (for
    non-login shells, such as X Window), and add 'export PATH'. (See 'man
    bash' for details.)

    --
    Hans Aberg

  8. Re: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    haberg@math.su.se (Hans Aberg) writes:

    > In article , Jochem Huhmann
    > wrote:
    >
    >> > If you want a system-wide installation, you can put the sources in
    >> > /usr/local/src, putting the compiled binary in /usr/local/bin, making sure
    >> > that PATH contains this directory. An alternative is to compile it in your
    >> > home directory.

    >>
    >> There's nothing wrong with always compiling it in your home directory
    >> and then install it where it belongs. "./configure && make && sudo make
    >> install"...

    >
    > I often compile in the home directory first, to check it works.


    What I meant was that you can (and should) always compile on a non-root
    account. There's no need to compile as root.

    > I then put the stuff in ~/local/, to avoid the home directory being
    > cluttered with files at the root level. Then the environment variable
    > $PATH should include $HOME/local/bin (first in the searchpath). One
    > can set them in the files '.profile' (for login shells such as
    > Terminal) and '.bashrc' (for non-login shells, such as X Window), and
    > add 'export PATH'. (See 'man bash' for details.)


    I'm using ~/.local/ (a hidden directory) and on OS X I'm seriously
    considering to go to ~/Library/local for that.


    Jochem

    --
    "A designer knows he has arrived at perfection not when there is no
    longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away."
    - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. Re: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    In article
    ,
    haberg@math.su.se (Hans Aberg) wrote:

    > And where the system likes it. :-)


    > If you want a system-wide installation, you can put the sources in
    > /usr/local/src, putting the compiled binary in /usr/local/bin, making sure
    > that PATH contains this directory. An alternative is to compile it in your
    > home directory.



    That's not what I meant. You can unpack the tarball anywhere, and
    compile anywhere. It would seem to me that you'd need root privileges to
    build stuff in a /usr/local/src. I have a ~/src just for this kind of
    thing. Most programs use an install script that places the stuff you've
    compiled into /usr/local/* by default, although you can change that.

    Pine's a bit different:


    Installing Pine and Pico is remarkably simple. You take the program
    files which you have just transferred or built and you move them to the
    correct directory on your system. Most often the binaries go in
    /usr/local/bin though sometimes they are placed in /usr/bin. All the
    help text is compiled into Pine so there are no required auxiliary files.

    --
    W. Oates
    Teal'c: He is concealing something.
    O'Neil: What is it?
    Teal'c: I do not know, he is concealing it.

  10. Re: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    In article ,
    Warren Oates wrote:

    > > If you want a system-wide installation, you can put the sources in
    > > /usr/local/src, putting the compiled binary in /usr/local/bin, making sure
    > > that PATH contains this directory. An alternative is to compile it in your
    > > home directory.

    >
    >
    > That's not what I meant. You can unpack the tarball anywhere, and
    > compile anywhere. It would seem to me that you'd need root privileges to
    > build stuff in a /usr/local/src. I have a ~/src just for this kind of
    > thing. Most programs use an install script that places the stuff you've
    > compiled into /usr/local/* by default, although you can change that.


    You need root permissions to run such an install script. The reasons for
    putting the stuff in /usr/local/src is that 1) one wants the sources
    accessible, 2) do not want to keep them in the home directory.

    > Pine's a bit different:
    >
    >
    > Installing Pine and Pico is remarkably simple. You take the program
    > files which you have just transferred or built and you move them to the
    > correct directory on your system. Most often the binaries go in
    > /usr/local/bin though sometimes they are placed in /usr/bin. All the
    > help text is compiled into Pine so there are no required auxiliary files.
    >


    On BSD system, by convention, (like the FreeBSD of Mac OS X) /usr/bin is
    reserved for the system installation, and /usr/local/bin is reserved for
    administrator installed programs. You might compare it to /System/Library
    and Library. Of course, you can go ahead designing your own system
    installation, but most fellows putting stuff into /usr/bin do not know
    that this is what they in effect are doing.

    --
    Hans Aberg

  11. Re: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    In article
    ,
    haberg@math.su.se (Hans Aberg) wrote:

    > On BSD system, by convention, (like the FreeBSD of Mac OS X) /usr/bin is
    > reserved for the system installation, and /usr/local/bin is reserved for
    > administrator installed programs. You might compare it to /System/Library
    > and Library. Of course, you can go ahead designing your own system
    > installation, but most fellows putting stuff into /usr/bin do not know
    > that this is what they in effect are doing.


    Some systems have Pine included in the "system installation" because the
    administrator assumes that some people will only be using the console.
    Such systems will frequently have Mutt and Slrn there too. You'll note
    that Darwin puts Pico in /usr/bin, and Pico is part of Pine. That was a
    quote from the Pine install instructions on the UW Pine website.
    --
    W. Oates
    Teal'c: He is concealing something.
    O'Neil: What is it?
    Teal'c: I do not know, he is concealing it.

  12. Re: How to install Unix apps on my ibook?

    In article ,
    Warren Oates wrote:

    > > On BSD system, by convention, (like the FreeBSD of Mac OS X) /usr/bin is
    > > reserved for the system installation, and /usr/local/bin is reserved for
    > > administrator installed programs. You might compare it to /System/Library
    > > and Library. Of course, you can go ahead designing your own system
    > > installation, but most fellows putting stuff into /usr/bin do not know
    > > that this is what they in effect are doing.

    >
    > Some systems have Pine included in the "system installation" because the
    > administrator assumes that some people will only be using the console.


    It will be runnable from the console if installed in /usr/local or the
    home directory as well: just set PATH.

    > Such systems will frequently have Mutt and Slrn there too. You'll note
    > that Darwin puts Pico in /usr/bin, and Pico is part of Pine.


    By the system installation, I mean what is usually shipped with the
    installation, i.e., in the case Mac OS X and the developer package. The
    guys designing the system installation can of course put anything they
    want there, and it is of course good to have commonly used programs there.
    If you want a modified system installation, you can and will put stuff in
    /usr/bin. But if you want to make updates or other additions, it is*safest
    to put it in /usr/local, as programs that expect the original system setup
    can then still access the system installation via full pathnames.

    >That was a
    > quote from the Pine install instructions on the UW Pine website.


    The main thing is that you know what you are doing. In the days of
    personal UNIX computers, it is somewhat dangerous to mention that stuff
    can be put into /usr/bin, as newbies will then put it there without
    considering potential consequences.

    --
    Hans Aberg

+ Reply to Thread