HELP: pppd won't answer/authenticate my dial-in - Unix

This is a discussion on HELP: pppd won't answer/authenticate my dial-in - Unix ; mark.bergman@thales-is.com writes: > I tried removing the "silent" ppp option, and I see the LCP Configure > Requests being sent in the debug file ("sent output frame of 58 > bytes..." in kernel syslog file) and timing out. That's a ...

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Thread: HELP: pppd won't answer/authenticate my dial-in

  1. Re: HELP: pppd won't answer/authenticate my dial-in

    mark.bergman@thales-is.com writes:
    > I tried removing the "silent" ppp option, and I see the LCP Configure
    > Requests being sent in the debug file ("sent output frame of 58
    > bytes..." in kernel syslog file) and timing out.


    That's a separate problem. I'm pretty sure this was discussed earlier
    -- you almost certainly don't want to use "silent."

    > Before (when using USR modem) I also got "missed ALLSTATIONS (0xff),
    > got 0xf3" which led you to the mismatched speed, but I'm not seeing
    > that this time - just the "sent output frame" messages.


    At a guess, you still have modem configuration problems. It's hard to
    tell at this point what those problems might be.

    (Common problems include having a modem that defaults to software flow
    control rather than hardware flow control, and a port set to 7 data
    bits rather than 8. Those are just wild guesses, though.)

    --
    James Carlson, KISS Network
    Sun Microsystems / 1 Network Drive 71.232W Vox +1 781 442 2084
    MS UBUR02-212 / Burlington MA 01803-2757 42.496N Fax +1 781 442 1677

  2. Re: HELP: pppd won't answer/authenticate my dial-in

    mark.bergman@thales-is.com writes:


    >James Carlson wrote:
    >> mark.bergman@thales-is.com writes:
    >> > So just to confirm, the speed parameter I pass to pppd must exactly
    >> > match the speed that the modems are talking at?

    >>
    >> Yes.


    >OK, I have now had some limited success!


    >As I mentioned, I was having problems getting the modems to connect at
    >high speeds.


    >Firstly, I put the modems between 2 PCs, using Hyperterminal on each at
    >57600, and dialled manually - Hey Presto I had a 57600 connection. -
    >this eliminated concerns about our internal telephone exchange.


    >Secondly, I put the receiving modem back to the Digital Unix box, and
    >ran "tip 57600" (with pppd not running) - modems connected at 1200.
    >I examined stty for the port, and its speed was 1200.
    >I killed the connection, and with tip still open, set the port speed
    >with stty to 57600.
    >Dial in again, and connection at 57600 - this shows that the port speed
    >must be set to 57600 to get the modems to connect at this speed.


    >Thirdly, I closed tip. Port speed went back to 1200.
    >I reinstated pppd (in /etc/inittab) - port speed still at 1200.
    >I used stty to set speed to 57600, and dialling in from the PC I
    >sometimes got a successful ppp connection, but many times the pppd died
    >and restarted (after I set the port speed), losing the speed setting,
    >so I was battling trying to set the speed and keep pppd running.


    It sounds to me like Digital Unix is messing with the port. Ie, each time
    it is reset it also resets the speed.
    Yes, you can give pppd the port speed to run at.
    Just put in the number
    pppd .... 57600


    >So, questions at the moment:
    >1) Should pppd be setting the port speed (in the same way that stty
    >does)


    Its default is 1200.

    >2) If I set the port speed with stty, should it get reset (e.g. if a
    >process that has the port open closes it or dies)?


    Ask the writers of Digital Unix. Noone else has access to the source code.


    >3) Is there anyway to retain the port speed (this is a XP1000 box
    >running Digital Unix 4.0F)


    tell pppd the port speed you want.

    In fact with most modern modems and serial cards, a better port speed is
    115200, the max speed the port can be set at. The port speed on most modems
    is independent of the connection speed and because of modem compression,
    should be higher than the modem to modem rate.



    >(We do have this working to some equipment on another site, and I am
    >trying to recreate it on some support equipment. On site the receiving
    >modem is a Multitech (rather than a US Robotics), so I am going to try
    >and obtain a Multitech modem to see if that is any better.)


    >Mark
    >mark . bergman @ thales - is . com



  3. Re: HELP: pppd won't answer/authenticate my dial-in


    mark.bergman@thales-is.com wrote:
    > call is answered on the UNIX box, but PPP doesn't seem to authenicate
    > it, and the call is terminated.


    Well, I appear to have full success now!

    I'm using a Multitech modem to receive on (which gets my modems to
    connect at 57600), and when doing more experimenting with a few
    telephone sockets on my company's exchange, found one combination that
    allows PPP to connect every time (using default modem options!)!
    (I had previously tried this pair of sockets the other way round
    unsuccessfully, i.e. with PC and UNIX box swapped).

    I should now really go back to the pair of USR modems, or do more
    experimentation with the phone sockets (go back to the reverse
    combination that failed previously, etc), but I don't want to touch my
    working setup in case I can't get it back again! (I've spent far too
    much time on this already!)

    Thanks to all who offered assistance
    Mark
    mark . bergman @ thales - is . com


  4. Re: HELP: pppd won't answer/authenticate my dial-in

    mark.bergman@thales-is.com writes:

    > James Carlson wrote:
    > > 1. Set up the modem so that it has a locked DTE rate.

    >
    > I had tried setting the modem speed. It has one option (&Un) for a
    > minimum speed and another (&Nn) for a maximum speed, but if I specify a
    > minimum speed higher than 1200/2400, it just rejects the incoming call
    > (presumably because it cannot negotiate higher)


    You need to set the DTE rate, not the DCE rate. The commands you're
    talking about set the DCE rate.

    Modern modems have two "sides" -- one is the serial link, and the
    other is the telephone connection. They're not really related to each
    other, because the encoding protocols on the telephone side are fairly
    sophisticated. What this means is that the modem does (and has to do)
    data buffering and flow control.

    Thus, there are two data rates involved. The one you care about here
    is the one on the serial side.

    --
    James Carlson, KISS Network
    Sun Microsystems / 1 Network Drive 71.232W Vox +1 781 442 2084
    MS UBUR02-212 / Burlington MA 01803-2757 42.496N Fax +1 781 442 1677

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