hostid - Unix

This is a discussion on hostid - Unix ; Hello folks , i have a question . what does hostid command on a sloaris sytem return. Is it related to IP address of the machine . if yes ..is there any way to convert hostid to ip adrdess.?? Thanks ...

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Thread: hostid

  1. hostid

    Hello folks ,
    i have a question .

    what does hostid command on a sloaris sytem return.
    Is it related to IP address of the machine .
    if yes ..is there any way to convert hostid to ip adrdess.??


    Thanks
    Akhielsh

  2. Re: hostid

    2008-10-30, 00:41(-07), aki:
    [...]
    > what does hostid command on a sloaris sytem return.
    > Is it related to IP address of the machine .
    > if yes ..is there any way to convert hostid to ip adrdess.??

    [...]

    No, it does a sysinfo(SI_HW_SERIAL), it's hardware specific.
    Even if you reinstall a different version of Solaris, you'll get
    the same number on a same machine. See sysinfo(2) for more info.

    --
    Stéphane

  3. Re: hostid

    Stephane CHAZELAS wrote:
    > 2008-10-30, 00:41(-07), aki:
    > [...]
    >> what does hostid command on a sloaris sytem return.
    >> Is it related to IP address of the machine .
    >> if yes ..is there any way to convert hostid to ip adrdess.??

    > [...]
    >
    > No, it does a sysinfo(SI_HW_SERIAL), it's hardware specific.
    > Even if you reinstall a different version of Solaris, you'll get
    > the same number on a same machine. See sysinfo(2) for more info.
    >

    Not on x86.

    --
    Ian Collins

  4. Re: hostid

    aki wrote:
    > Hello folks ,
    > i have a question .
    >

    Please don't multi-post.

    --
    Ian Collins

  5. Re: hostid

    On Oct 30, 3:07 pm, and...@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel)
    wrote:
    > In article <6mta1eFii82...@mid.individual.net>,
    > Ian Collins writes:
    >
    > > Stephane CHAZELAS wrote:
    > >> 2008-10-30, 00:41(-07), aki:
    > >> [...]
    > >>> what does hostid command on a sloaris sytem return.
    > >>> Is it related to IP address of the machine .
    > >>> if yes ..is there any way to convert hostid to ip adrdess.??
    > >> [...]

    >
    > >> No, it does a sysinfo(SI_HW_SERIAL), it's hardware specific.
    > >> Even if you reinstall a different version of Solaris, you'll get
    > >> the same number on a same machine. See sysinfo(2) for more info.

    >
    > > Not on x86.

    >
    > The x86 installer tries to save and reuse the same hostid from an
    > existing system, even when you aren't doing an upgrade install.
    > This worked all the way through from Solaris x86 2.1 to Solaris x86 9.
    > I haven't tried installing Solaris x86 10 on a system which was running
    > Solaris x86 9, but I believe there was initially an issue there with
    > getting the hostid from the old 32 bit kernel module into the new 64 bit
    > kernel module (might have been fixed before FCS though).
    >
    > --
    > Andrew Gabriel
    > [email address is not usable -- followup in the newsgroup]




    so it means that we cannot get ip address from hostid of machine.
    thanks..
    Aki

  6. Re: hostid

    2008-10-30, 03:29(-07), aki:
    [...]
    > so it means that we cannot get ip address from hostid of machine.
    > thanks..

    [...]

    No, and note that there is no such thing as "the
    IP address of a machine", a machine has an IP address for every
    network it is connected to. It's righter to say that each of its
    network interfaces has an IP address. For instance, it generally has a
    127.0.0.1 IPv4 address for its address on the loopback network,
    it can have one or more IPv4 addresses for each of its ethernet
    NIC which can be assigned dynamically. For every tunnel you set
    up, you'll have more IP addresses. And we've not talked yet of
    IPv6 addresses.

    The hostid is a number that uniquely identifies a host. It has
    nothing to do with networks. You may be confusing with a
    hostname which generally identifies a machine in a few different
    contexts (whether withing a single network, or within a NIS
    or Microsoft Windows domain). A hostname can resolve to one or
    more IP addresses (which may depend on the context: if a machine
    is connected to several networks, the "authority" responsible
    for name resolution on those networks may give different results
    for a same hostname).

    --
    Stéphane

  7. Re: hostid

    Stephane CHAZELAS writes:
    > 2008-10-30, 03:29(-07), aki:
    > [...]
    >> so it means that we cannot get ip address from hostid of machine.
    >> thanks..

    > [...]
    >
    > No, and note that there is no such thing as "the
    > IP address of a machine", a machine has an IP address for every
    > network it is connected to. It's righter to say that each of its
    > network interfaces has an IP address.


    This 'depends': There are two well-known ways for dealing with
    multi-homing:

    (1) assume that IP addresses belong to a host (so-called 'weak
    end system')

    (2) assume that IP addresses belong to certain interfaces of
    a host (so-called 'strong end system')

    While people tend to assume (2), all systems I had to deal with so far
    actually implement (1) as default. In particular, this implies that
    any IP-address assigned to a host can be reached by going through any
    interface.


  8. Re: hostid

    Andrew Gabriel wrote:
    > In article <6mta1eFii82jU6@mid.individual.net>,
    > Ian Collins writes:
    >> Stephane CHAZELAS wrote:
    >>> 2008-10-30, 00:41(-07), aki:
    >>> [...]
    >>>> what does hostid command on a sloaris sytem return.
    >>>> Is it related to IP address of the machine .
    >>>> if yes ..is there any way to convert hostid to ip adrdess.??
    >>> [...]
    >>>
    >>> No, it does a sysinfo(SI_HW_SERIAL), it's hardware specific.
    >>> Even if you reinstall a different version of Solaris, you'll get
    >>> the same number on a same machine. See sysinfo(2) for more info.
    >>>

    >> Not on x86.

    >
    > The x86 installer tries to save and reuse the same hostid from an
    > existing system, even when you aren't doing an upgrade install.


    I was referring to clean installs, the hostid does not depend on the
    hardware.

    --
    Ian Collins

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