Looking for SVR4 system - Unix

This is a discussion on Looking for SVR4 system - Unix ; Hello All, I'm starting a retro-computing project that will take me back to the early '90s. The project involves i486/ISA/SCSI hardware and AT&T SVR4.2 and is purely hobby related. I used to be heavily involved in the Public Access UNIX ...

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  1. Looking for SVR4 system

    Hello All,

    I'm starting a retro-computing project that will take me back to the
    early '90s.

    The project involves i486/ISA/SCSI hardware and AT&T SVR4.2 and is
    purely hobby related. I used to be heavily involved in the Public
    Access
    UNIX world, and would like to relive some of it.

    If any of you remember this stuff and still have SVR4.2 lying around
    and
    are willing to part with it or make disk/tape images, please, please
    let me know.

    To be specific:
    I'm looking for a complete distribution of AT&T System V Release 4.2
    UNIX for the i486. I would really like it on 150MB QIC tape, but will
    take whatever I can get as long as it is a complete system. That
    means
    I need the development set, TCP/IP, man pages, SCSI drivers, and at
    least the 2-16 user license upgrade.

    If you have such a beast or know where I can get one, I'd be forever
    grateful. I'm happy to pay a reasonable amount for it.

    Thanks in advance,
    Tom

  2. Re: Looking for SVR4 system

    On Sep 8, 10:44 am, TommyTune wrote:
    > Hello All,
    >
    > I'm starting a retro-computing project that will take me back to the
    > early '90s.
    >
    > The project involves i486/ISA/SCSI hardware and AT&T SVR4.2 and is
    > purely hobby related. I used to be heavily involved in the Public
    > Access
    > UNIX world, and would like to relive some of it.
    > [...]


    Then you'll love this: [Click on SDF Homepage]

  3. Re: Looking for SVR4 system

    Hi Thad,

    I'm amazed to see you still here after all these years. I used to hang
    around here in the mid '80s to early '90s when things started going
    downhill. Maybe not so much for the comp.unix groups though. But I
    seem to remember you being around here back then, or at least a long
    time ago.

    It turns out I'm a member and supporter of SDF, and I started my first
    public access unix system right about when SDF got started. Mine
    transitioned to an ISP in the mid '90s and I went on to other things,
    though still in the internet area generally.

    So I've been working with FeeeBSD, and it's fun, but I still want to
    get back to an old SVR3/4 operating system. Can anyone help?

    Tom

    On Sep 9, 3:26*am, Thad Floryan wrote:
    > On Sep 8, 10:44 am, TommyTune wrote:
    >
    > > Hello All,

    >
    > > I'm starting a retro-computing project that will take me back to the
    > > early '90s.

    >
    > > The project involves i486/ISA/SCSI hardware and AT&T SVR4.2 and is
    > > purely hobby related. I used to be heavily involved in the Public
    > > Access
    > > UNIX world, and would like to relive some of it.
    > > [...]

    >
    > Then you'll love this: [Click on SDF Homepage]



  4. Re: Looking for SVR4 system

    On Sep 13, 8:40 am, TommyTune wrote:
    > Hi Thad,
    >
    > I'm amazed to see you still here after all these years. I used to hang
    > around here in the mid '80s to early '90s when things started going
    > downhill. Maybe not so much for the comp.unix groups though. But I
    > seem to remember you being around here back then, or at least a long
    > time ago.


    Heh, I was more active in the Usenet forums when I ran the AT&T
    Silicon
    Valley UNIX Users' Group for the entirety of its existence. Work
    demands
    didn't leave me much "free time" from the mid 1990s until recently and
    right now I'm out "looking" again since the demise of Levanta
    (formerly
    Linuxcare).

    I still have about 20 UNIX and Solaris boxes here at home accompanied
    by
    10 Linux and several Windows boxes. Gotta stay current and multi-
    booting
    helps: my Solaris 10u5 box can also boot into Fedora 9 and Vista SP1;
    its
    config from a Solaris 10 point-of-view can be seen here:



    > It turns out I'm a member and supporter of SDF, and I started my first
    > public access unix system right about when SDF got started. Mine
    > transitioned to an ISP in the mid '90s and I went on to other things,
    > though still in the internet area generally.
    >
    > So I've been working with FeeeBSD, and it's fun, but I still want to
    > get back to an old SVR3/4 operating system. Can anyone help?


    How about SVR2? I have three fully-loaded 3B1 systems that still boot
    and
    run just fine. They have the external expansion chassis along with the
    VoicePower cards, Ethernet, StarLAN, max RAM, etc. Some info about
    them
    and my early StarLAN configs can be found in the O'Reilly "Managing
    uucp
    and Usenet" book. Complete AT&T doc set and even the Reference Manual
    (which is really a service manual with schematics, etc.). These run
    gcc
    version 1.37 and even GNU Emacs and feature a built-in tilt'n'swivel
    monitor, keyboard "garage" and 3-button mice. I'm still in Silicon
    Valley.

    :-)

  5. Re: Looking for SVR4 system

    > Heh, I was more active in the Usenet forums when I ran the AT&T
    > Silicon
    > Valley UNIX Users' Group for the entirety of its existence. Work
    > demands
    > didn't leave me much "free time" from the mid 1990s until recently and
    > right now I'm out "looking" again since the demise of Levanta
    > (formerly
    > Linuxcare).


    Sorry to hear you're out hustling again. These days I'm the CTO at a
    software company, way out here in Virginia where I've been for the
    past 20 years. Seems like we're similar sorts of creatures - I founded
    and ran the Tidewater UNIX Users Group in 1988 and ran it till the mid
    '90s when I just got too busy with work and a growing family. Now as I
    get closer to retirement, or so I like to dream, I find myself
    thinking about that sort of thing again.

    > I still have about 20 UNIX and Solaris boxes here at home accompanied
    > by
    > 10 Linux and several Windows boxes. *Gotta stay current and multi-
    > booting
    > helps: my Solaris 10u5 box can also boot into Fedora 9 and Vista SP1;
    > its
    > config from a Solaris 10 point-of-view can be seen here:
    >
    >


    Sounds pretty familiar

    I've got a bunch of miscellaneous stuff here at home. too. My daily
    drivers are Mac laptops. I really like the beautiful user interface
    with UNIX underneath. I find it to be the most productive computing
    environment I've ever used, almost without significant competition.
    (Hope I don't unwittingly start a flamewar here - not my intent!)

    My home server is a white-box system with a couple of Xeons, Sata2
    RAID 5, and a couple gigs of ram, running Fedora Core. I built it from
    scratch and it's a couple years old now, but still more than suits my
    needs. Otherwise, I've got a dual processor Athlon machine I'm now
    running FreeBSD on and also an old AT&T 3B2/400 that I'm just starting
    to restore. It's almost running.

    > How about SVR2? I have three fully-loaded 3B1 systems that still boot
    > and
    > run just fine. They have the external expansion chassis along with the
    > VoicePower cards, Ethernet, StarLAN, max RAM, etc. *Some info about
    > them
    > and my early StarLAN configs can be found in the O'Reilly "Managing
    > uucp
    > and Usenet" book. Complete AT&T doc set and even the Reference Manual
    > (which is really a service manual with schematics, etc.). These run
    > gcc
    > version 1.37 and even GNU Emacs and feature a built-in tilt'n'swivel
    > monitor, keyboard "garage" and 3-button mice. *I'm still in Silicon
    > Valley.
    >
    > :-)


    Wow! I used to have one of those and gave it away many years ago. I
    kick myself every time I think about that. What a cool machine. If
    you're saying you could be convinced to part with one of them, please
    email me and let's discuss.

    For the purposes of this project I'm working on, I really need 3.2 or
    4 though. Not because of any particular functionality, but because I'm
    trying to recreate a specific timeframe which used a specific set of
    technologies. The timeframe is what I still consider the "golden era"
    of the Internet, the very late '80s to the mid '90s, and it's really
    the early '90s that are the sweet spot for me. This was when we had
    some pretty capable machines (486 to Pentium) in the consumer space,
    good mass storage (SCSI2, bigger disks, QIC and DAT tape), fast modems
    and the beginnings of wide area networking with ethernet and leased
    data lines, and a very vibrant USENET and UNIX developer community.It
    just felt "right", and it started going downhill in my mind about when
    we got high resolution graphics displays and SL/IP in the hands of the
    masses. I had more fun in those years than as any other time in my
    life and most people would consider me an "old guy" at this point.So I
    could go on and on, but I won't

    I really need SVR3.2 or 4.x for what I want to do on this little
    project. The interesting thing is that I've still got a number of
    friends from that time who are at least superficially interested in
    building an "old style" infrastructure. There's even been some talk of
    UUCP. Remember managing that stuff with B-News?

    Cheers, and it's comforting to know that some of the folks I remember
    from way back when are still here. I noticed that Barry Margolin is
    still here and I bet if I poked around, I'd find more.

    Tom

  6. Re: Looking for SVR4 system

    On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 05:45:17 -0700 (PDT),
    TommyTune wrote:
    > For the purposes of this project I'm working on, I really need 3.2 or
    > 4 though.


    I suppose I could try and dig up the mot-branded 3.3? tape that came
    with the 88k based machine I have in storage somewhere. I haven't a clue
    as to either tape or hardware state, nevermind usefulness. Basically the
    box is a fancied-up vme backplane and a mvme197le? board in it.

    This doesn't help you if you have or want 486 type hardware, but if you
    can find one of those vme boards (or a mot 900 series box, which looks
    lots of pretty) it might be a vaguely possible option.


    Digging it up is going to be a moderately long term project due to the
    distances involved and, oh, the box I'd be using to copy the tape has a
    dead disk. I probably can work something out, though, but it'll be slow
    going.


    --
    j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
    Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
    consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.

  7. Re: Looking for SVR4 system

    On Sep 14, 5:45 am, TommyTune wrote:
    > [...]
    > I really need SVR3.2 or 4.x for what I want to do on this little
    > project. The interesting thing is that I've still got a number of
    > friends from that time who are at least superficially interested in
    > building an "old style" infrastructure. There's even been some talk of
    > UUCP. Remember managing that stuff with B-News?


    Yep, and I believe I had one of the first home Ethernet networks as
    you
    can read about in the O'Reilly book "Managing uucp and Usenet"
    regarding
    my StarLAN (AT&T and HP) configs. The hardware still works though I
    now
    have a 30 Mbps Internet connection at home; StarLAN was 1Mbps and I
    had,
    until the FCC reallocated the spectrum causing me to lose it on July
    31,
    2008, a microwave 6Mbps connection that "flew" over San Francisco Bay;
    you
    can see the antenna setup here:



    > Cheers, and it's comforting to know that some of the folks I remember
    > from way back when are still here. I noticed that Barry Margolin is
    > still here and I bet if I poked around, I'd find more.


    Incredible, huh? :-)

    For a variety of reasons I've been relatively inactive on Usenet for a
    decade or so, and I'm amazed to find so many familiar names still
    "haunting"
    the ol' stomping grounds. I used to have a 110 baud connection to the
    'Net
    back in the 1960s, and ARPANET was a godsend in the 1970s. Want some
    more
    nostalgia? Here's an old ARPANET map I recently found in my files
    (scanned):



    Here's the oldest Emacs manual I could find in my files (scanned):



    and here's the original blurb for Sun computers as revealed at the
    HP Computer Colloquium series when I held the first Sun computer in
    my hands (scanned):



    Time flies. :-)




  8. Re: Looking for SVR4 system

    Hi,

    Thanks for your generosity, but for one reason or another, this has to
    be an i486 system.

    Tom

    On Sep 14, 9:26*am, jpd wrote:
    > On Sun, 14 Sep 2008 05:45:17 -0700 (PDT),
    >
    > TommyTune wrote:
    > > For the purposes of this project I'm working on, I really need 3.2 or
    > > 4 though.

    >
    > I suppose I could try and dig up the mot-branded 3.3? tape that came
    > with the 88k based machine I have in storage somewhere. I haven't a clue
    > as to either tape or hardware state, nevermind usefulness. Basically the
    > box is a fancied-up vme backplane and a mvme197le? board in it.
    >
    > This doesn't help you if you have or want 486 type hardware, but if you
    > can find one of those vme boards (or a mot 900 series box, which looks
    > lots of pretty) it might be a vaguely possible option.
    >
    > Digging it up is going to be a moderately long term project due to the
    > distances involved and, oh, the box I'd be using to copy the tape has a
    > dead disk. I probably can work something out, though, but it'll be slow
    > going.
    >
    > --
    > * j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
    > * This message was originally posted on Usenet in plain text.
    > * Any other representation, additions, or changes do not have my
    > * consent and may be a violation of international copyright law.



  9. Re: Looking for SVR4 system

    On Sep 14, 9:45*am, Thad Floryan wrote:


    >
    > > Cheers, and it's comforting to know that some of the folks I remember
    > > from way back when are still here. I noticed that Barry Margolin is
    > > still here and I bet if I poked around, I'd find more.

    >
    > Incredible, huh? *:-)
    >
    > For a variety of reasons I've been relatively inactive on Usenet for a
    > decade or so, and I'm amazed to find so many familiar names still
    > "haunting"
    > the ol' stomping grounds.


    Agreed, and I'm just starting to find my way around the groups again.

    *I used to have a 110 baud connection to the
    > 'Net
    > back in the 1960s, and ARPANET was a godsend in the 1970s. *Want some
    > more
    > nostalgia? *Here's an old ARPANET map I recently found in my files
    > (scanned):
    >
    >
    >
    > Here's the oldest Emacs manual I could find in my files (scanned):
    >
    >
    >
    > and here's the original blurb for Sun computers as revealed at the
    > HP Computer Colloquium series when I held the first Sun computer in
    > my hands (scanned):
    >
    >
    >
    > Time flies. :-)


    Cool stuff! I started on the Arpanet in the early '80s while I was at
    grad school and loved the whole thing so much I started doing it full
    time in '92 after my first retirement. My last job in the navy was as
    Ops Officer for one of the Arpa sites, though I couldn't find it
    during a quick look at your old map. I think it would have been called
    LANTCOM back then, but not really sure. I remember logging onto the
    net through a Milnet TAC at 300bps back then, and also having a net id
    that was something like tm12. After looking around for those personal
    id's, I couldn't find reference to them anymore.

    Time flies!


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