Back to 8.04 - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Back to 8.04 - Ubuntu ; Did the upgrade to 8.10, lost graphics, mouse & dunno what else but I don't have the time or knowledge to tweak the new install to what I had in 8.04 (I'm still a noob). I have pasted together an ...

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  1. Back to 8.04

    Did the upgrade to 8.10, lost graphics, mouse & dunno what else but I
    don't have the time or knowledge to tweak the new install to what I had
    in 8.04 (I'm still a noob). I have pasted together an old Dell Dem 550
    box with 2 hds - a 30g and an 8g. 8.10 boots from /media/disk which is
    where my new /home is. My old /home is under root (/).
    I'd like to make my 30 g drive be /home with my old /home placed
    there.and reinnstall 8.04 on the 8g hd, using 8.04 alone.
    I think I start this by using gpart - yes?

    I am also having trouble on getting a handle on mount - how would I have
    all media mounted on boot every time (I'm solo user of this machine)?

  2. Re: Back to 8.04

    jrg wrote:
    > Did the upgrade to 8.10, lost graphics, mouse & dunno what else but I
    > don't have the time or knowledge to tweak the new install to what I had
    > in 8.04 (I'm still a noob). I have pasted together an old Dell Dem 550
    > box with 2 hds - a 30g and an 8g. 8.10 boots from /media/disk which is
    > where my new /home is. My old /home is under root (/).
    > I'd like to make my 30 g drive be /home with my old /home placed
    > there.and reinnstall 8.04 on the 8g hd, using 8.04 alone.
    > I think I start this by using gpart - yes?
    >



    Gparted, or any partition editor will work. The Ubuntu LiveCD has one or
    more. You can only work on a partition that is NOT mounted though, so
    the LiveCD is a plus.


    > I am also having trouble on getting a handle on mount - how would I have
    > all media mounted on boot every time (I'm solo user of this machine)?
    >



    Put the needed partition information, mountpoints, etc. in the
    /etc/fstab file.


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, AT&T, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  3. Re: Back to 8.04

    On 11/10/2008 11:21 AM John F. Morse scribbled:

    > jrg wrote:
    >> Did the upgrade to 8.10, lost graphics, mouse & dunno what else but I
    >> don't have the time or knowledge to tweak the new install to what I had
    >> in 8.04 (I'm still a noob). I have pasted together an old Dell Dem 550
    >> box with 2 hds - a 30g and an 8g. 8.10 boots from /media/disk which is
    >> where my new /home is. My old /home is under root (/).
    >> I'd like to make my 30 g drive be /home with my old /home placed
    >> there.and reinnstall 8.04 on the 8g hd, using 8.04 alone.
    >> I think I start this by using gpart - yes?
    >>

    >
    >
    > Gparted, or any partition editor will work. The Ubuntu LiveCD has one or
    > more. You can only work on a partition that is NOT mounted though, so
    > the LiveCD is a plus.


    ok, thanks.

    >
    >> I am also having trouble on getting a handle on mount - how would I have
    >> all media mounted on boot every time (I'm solo user of this machine)?
    >>

    >
    >
    > Put the needed partition information, mountpoints, etc. in the
    > /etc/fstab file.
    >
    >

    is there a gui for this?



  4. Re: Back to 8.04

    jrg schreef:
    > On 11/10/2008 11:21 AM John F. Morse scribbled:
    >
    >> jrg wrote:
    >>> Did the upgrade to 8.10, lost graphics, mouse & dunno what else but I
    >>> don't have the time or knowledge to tweak the new install to what I had
    >>> in 8.04 (I'm still a noob). I have pasted together an old Dell Dem 550
    >>> box with 2 hds - a 30g and an 8g. 8.10 boots from /media/disk which is
    >>> where my new /home is. My old /home is under root (/).
    >>> I'd like to make my 30 g drive be /home with my old /home placed
    >>> there.and reinnstall 8.04 on the 8g hd, using 8.04 alone.
    >>> I think I start this by using gpart - yes?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Gparted, or any partition editor will work. The Ubuntu LiveCD has one or
    >> more. You can only work on a partition that is NOT mounted though, so
    >> the LiveCD is a plus.

    >
    > ok, thanks.
    >
    >>> I am also having trouble on getting a handle on mount - how would I have
    >>> all media mounted on boot every time (I'm solo user of this machine)?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Put the needed partition information, mountpoints, etc. in the
    >> /etc/fstab file.
    >>
    >>

    > is there a gui for this?
    >
    >

    Yes, any text editor will do, just make sure you run it as sudo and make
    a back up before editing!

  5. Re: Back to 8.04


    > is there a gui for this?
    >
    >

    Hi, you can use "Storage Device Manager" or "MountManager" both
    available as standard download with Ubuntu.

    MrKappa

  6. Re: Back to 8.04

    jrg wrote:
    > is there a gui for this?


    If you absolutely need, install pysdm.

    --
    As we enjoy great advantages from inventions of others, we should be
    glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
    and this we should do freely and generously.
    --Benjamin Franklin

  7. Re: Back to 8.04

    jrg wrote:

    >> Put the needed partition information, mountpoints, etc. in the
    >> /etc/fstab file.

    > is there a gui for this?



    I am unaware of one, but I see three others have offered some info.

    I've always used a text editor like vi/vim or gedit. They are actually
    GUI, gedit being the GNOME Editor, and vi/vim being used through a GUI
    terminal. Another easy editor is nano, or joe.

    I rarely use a "real" TTY terminal because of it's smaller line length
    and lines per page (80 x 25 size), no easy copy and paste, and the white
    text on black, which is difficult for me to see. I will use a TTY
    terminal if I'm messing with a very old and weak PC, because it can take
    minutes to respond if the X server is running.

    I know these things are customizable, but the GNOME Terminal is so fast
    to use. I have it set as a hot-key in the Keyboard Shortcuts to use the
    SuperR key (the Windows "flag" logo on the right side). All I need to do
    to get a terminal is hit that key. A real convenience for someone who
    needs one or multiple terminals many times every hour.

    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, AT&T, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  8. Re: Back to 8.04

    John F. Morse wrote:
    > I rarely use a "real" TTY terminal because of it's smaller line length
    > and lines per page (80 x 25 size), no easy copy and paste


    Using screen in a TTY will allow you to copy and paste, pretty easily.

    > A real convenience for someone who
    > needs one or multiple terminals many times every hour.


    Screen replaces multiple terminals.

    Ah, sweet sweet screen, is there nothing you can't do?

    --
    As we enjoy great advantages from inventions of others, we should be
    glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
    and this we should do freely and generously.
    --Benjamin Franklin

  9. Re: Back to 8.04

    johnny bobby bee wrote:
    > John F. Morse wrote:
    >> I rarely use a "real" TTY terminal because of it's smaller line
    >> length and lines per page (80 x 25 size), no easy copy and paste

    >
    > Using screen in a TTY will allow you to copy and paste, pretty easily.
    >
    >> A real convenience for someone who needs one or multiple terminals
    >> many times every hour.

    >
    > Screen replaces multiple terminals.
    >
    > Ah, sweet sweet screen, is there nothing you can't do?
    >


    So it does. Thanks for the tip.

    I even notice I have a mouse on a regular TTY terminal (i.e.
    etc.). I don't remember having a mouse before. Maybe I
    don't on a TTY terminal on a PC that doesn't have X, or I have killed X?
    Maybe I've just never tried the mouse?! ;-)

    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, AT&T, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  10. Re: Back to 8.04

    John F. Morse wrote:
    > I rarely use a "real" TTY terminal because of it's smaller line length
    > and lines per page (80 x 25 size), no easy copy and paste, and the white
    > text on black, which is difficult for me to see.


    As noted above, screen is invaluable when using a "real" TTY. Also if
    you configure your kernel parameters properly in your bootloader then
    you can get the framebuffer at a much higher resolution than default,
    and therefore have way more than 80x25. I added vga=795 to the end of
    mine to give a 1280x1024 24 bit framebuffer. For Ubuntu that's in
    /boot/grub/menu.lst

    --
    George Kettleborough

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