My employer completed migration of apps to Linux - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on My employer completed migration of apps to Linux - Ubuntu ; On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 00:19:09 +0000, Christopher Hunter wrote: > The Natural Philosopher wrote: > >> The truth is that Linux is a great server, but struggles as a dektop due >> to lack of apps. > > Wrong! ...

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Thread: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

  1. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 00:19:09 +0000, Christopher Hunter wrote:

    > The Natural Philosopher wrote:
    >
    >> The truth is that Linux is a great server, but struggles as a dektop due
    >> to lack of apps.

    >
    > Wrong! There are just as many apps for Linux as there are for Windows.


    While technically true, they're not typically the kinds of apps that people
    are looking for. They're looking for commercial grade apps to satisfy
    their needs.

    If you're needs are server oriented, then sure Linux has boat loads of
    commercial grade (or near commercial) apps. If your needs are desktop
    oriented, then it's significantly more difficult.

    Let's take CRM or Contact Management, for instance. There are some great
    server oriented CRM products for Linux, such as Sugar CRM, but this
    requires setting up a web sever as well as the associated web apps.

    This is not the same as buying a product in a store, taking it home,
    pluggin in the disk, and clicking next and then you have an icon on your
    desktop. The majority of small businesses and entrepeneur types aren't
    going to put up with the Linux method of setup and configuration of server
    style apps. What's more, desktop client apps have a certain level of
    responsiveness that web apps simply cannot match, and end users like that.

  2. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 19:56:14 -0600, snipe wrote:

    >> The truth is that Linux is a great server, but struggles as a dektop
    >> due to lack of apps.

    >
    > What applications would that be? The only thing I can think of is
    > games, but none of the computer-owning adults I know are into computer
    > games.


    There are literally Millions of third party, vertical apps. Stuff that's
    been written in-house in VB or stuff designed for a specific market (Soil
    conservation, Agriculture, Water Treatment, Healthcare, Business
    Intelligence, etc..).

    There are a lot of classes of commercial apps that don't have Linux
    equivelents, or linux equivelents that work in the way end users want them
    to.

  3. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux



    "John Kloosterman" wrote in message
    news:490f37f2$0$19083$bf4948fe@news.tele2.nl...
    > dennis@home wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> "Christopher Hunter" wrote in message
    >> news:6n8d0mFk90rfU4@mid.individual.net...
    >>> MD5dennis licked his wounds and prattled:
    >>>
    >>>>> You *can* be certain that all MS "operating systems" include
    >>>>> "facilities"
    >>>>> for the NSA (or whatever they're called this week).
    >>>
    >>>> So show one then!
    >>>
    >>> Take a look at the browser flaw that was "resolved" by the recent
    >>> "urgent"
    >>> Windows patch. The one that wasn't issued on a "patch Tuesday". The
    >>> underlying flaw has been covered up, but there are /still/ several
    >>> points of
    >>> possible access *using* *that* *flaw* - the patch was only issued to:
    >>>
    >>> (a) Show that they're doing "something" (after yet another bank
    >>> compromise)
    >>>
    >>> (b) Close the backdoor that was recently exploited by the Russians.
    >>> (Change
    >>> one address call, and the exploit /still/ works!)

    >>
    >> So now you are claiming any code error that allows the possibility of
    >> remote access is a plot.
    >> You are paranoid.

    >
    > Or you are terribly naive. Is it really impossible?
    >
    > Sure.. Big corporations and a government never ever do things like testing
    > hallucinogen or war gas on people. They also absolutely can resist the
    > opportunity to hide some stuff in parts of code nobody is allowed to see
    > and is used worldwide. What a relief!
    >
    > And pigs can fly of coarse...
    >
    >> BTW does that mean linux is also full of stuff to allow the NSA in as it
    >> also has and has had lots of similar exploits possible.
    >>

    >
    > The difference is that anybody can see the code and there ARE things that
    > are corrected. It is impossible to hide NSA-things. The key here is "not
    > hidden". Easy eh?


    Its impossible to hide it even in windows.
    That is the point.
    Just having the source doesn't mean you can't hide something.
    It has been demonstrated that you can add stuff that isn't in the source so
    unless you disassemble the binary you don't know.
    The same as for windows.
    >
    >>>
    >>> //Abuse snipped//

    >>
    >> You call this abuse
    >>
    >> "So show one then!
    >> You just keep chuntering away and making stuff up, no sensible person
    >> believes a word you say."
    >>
    >> You are an idiot.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > It is sometimes better to be called an idiot, than to be blamed for
    > something terrible that happened because you was blindly trusting the
    > wrong persons/corporations - just to avoid being called a idiot.
    >
    > Now think about that... ;-).


    You are the one that thinks peer review of source code makes you safe.
    I think lots of people looking at the windows binaries make that a lot safer
    as there is nowhere to hide the stuff like there is with source code review.


  4. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    Stephan Rose illuminated alt.os.linux.ubuntu by typing:

    >
    > I mean seriously, unless someone is a graphics artist, who needs
    > Photoshop? There are far more efficient and better suited tools to look
    > at, resize and rotate poor pictures taken by poor cameras by a person who
    > didn't have a clue how to use a camera in the first place.


    I wouldn't call myself a graphic artist, but Photoshop is a must for
    me. I need to produce 300dpi, CMYK files. There is no way to do this
    under linux natively. However, the good news is that CS2 runs damn
    well and far quicker (IME) under Wine than it does under MS.

    I actually use crappy photos from camera phones to "enhance" my
    finished image too. It gives some interesting effects. ;-)

    Oh. And before anyone asks, I did purchase CS2. It isn't overly
    expensive and gives better results than anything else I've used.

    --
    "Chopsticks are one of the reasons the Chinese never invented custard."
    Spike Milligan

  5. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 22:13:02 -0600, Ignoramus22113 wrote:

    > Another thing about this PowerShell is that it is some sort of a
    > newfangled, experimental thing from Microsoft. It is not even a part
    > of Windows yet. So they can discontinue it at any time like they did
    > with other products. They can also choose to charge a license fee for
    > it.


    You are batting .000. It's been part of Windows since Windows 2008. I
    know, it's only been a year, you can hardly be blamed (rolling eyes).

    It's not experimental, and it's been a released product for 3 years.

    > There is no source code for it and, therefore, it is risky to
    > use. Conversely, bash and perl are free and are maintained in a
    > reliable fashion (meaning that they will not be "discontinued").


    More excuses for why you are incompetant to write software that works well
    on Windows.

    No wonder you chose your name. You knew it all along.

  6. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 11:39:14 +0000, LusoTec wrote:

    >> Also utter BS. The single most advanced scripting environment available
    >> for general purpose computers is PowerShell. It blows the doors of any
    >> other scripting environment out there.

    > (...)
    >
    > That is a joke, right?! Only someone with little (or no experience) with
    > scripting languages and system administration can anyone consider
    > PowerShell "The single most advanced scripting environment available for
    > general purpose computers"


    By all means, explain why that's true.

    What makes PowerShell inferior? Every comparison i've ever read has given
    PowerShell high marks, even from Linux developers.

    Besides not being cross platform, what are your arguments?

  7. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    Stephan Rose wrote:
    > On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 10:47:56 -0600, John F. Morse wrote:
    >
    >
    >> John Kloosterman wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> You know.. I think it is strange people stating MS-Windows is
    >>> unmissable always come up with applications only a very, very exclusive
    >>> small minority are using. Example? "you cannot use Linux because it
    >>> does not run AutoCAD." So what? How many standard households (and
    >>> middle-of-the-road company's) are using AutoCAD? The same for the
    >>> latest and the newest Photoshop. How many standard households (and
    >>> middle-of-the-road company's) can't survive without the newest and
    >>> latest (CS3) Photoshop. How many many standard households (and
    >>> middle-of-the-road company's) can even afford those applications
    >>> (without pirating - another thing in majority only existing in
    >>> windows-land).
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Sigh - of all stupid things...
    >>>

    >> What might be considered stupid is to believe that every household is
    >> the same. Or that any are "standard," whatever that might mean in your
    >> dream -- today.
    >>
    >> I run AutoCAD, but I don't in any way believe that I can't use Linux. I
    >> use Linux for nearly everything, but if I should need to use AutoCAD,
    >> then I move over to a Windows box.
    >>
    >> Maybe your vision of a "standard household" only contains one computer?
    >> I don't know, but I evidentially don't even appear in your narrow view
    >> of computerdom, eh.
    >>
    >> What "they" do is not my concern, and shouldn't be a target of your
    >> observations either.
    >>

    >
    > He's got a very valid point though. Seriously, how many households need
    > or use AutoCAD? With software like that it is more than fair enough to
    > say that the greater majority of people probably don't.
    >
    > Photoshop I also agree. If I think about all the people I personally know
    > that even own it in the first place, very few. That gets reduced to
    > absolutely none if I only consider those who actually know how to use it
    > to a fraction of it's potential and/or actually purchased it.
    >
    > I mean seriously, unless someone is a graphics artist, who needs
    > Photoshop? There are far more efficient and better suited tools to look
    > at, resize and rotate poor pictures taken by poor cameras by a person who
    > didn't have a clue how to use a camera in the first place.
    >
    > Fer crying out loud, people think that the **** cellphones produce is
    > great! Does those people really need Photoshop to resize their crap
    > quality pictures?
    >
    > If the developers working on the standard image viewer in Gnome and just
    > expand it's abilities to include standard operations such as Resize and
    > Crop you could easily cover over 90% of the needs of most people. That's
    > more than sufficient.



    He (and you) may have a valid point -- in c.o.l.a -- but not here.

    Even your "Gnome" vs. the real "GNOME" is off topic here, eh?


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, AT&T, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  8. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    John Kloosterman wrote:
    > John F. Morse wrote:
    >> John Kloosterman wrote:
    >>
    >>> You know.. I think it is strange people stating MS-Windows is
    >>> unmissable always come up with applications only a very, very
    >>> exclusive small minority are using. Example? "you cannot use Linux
    >>> because it does not run AutoCAD." So what? How many standard
    >>> households (and middle-of-the-road company's) are using AutoCAD? The
    >>> same for the latest and the newest Photoshop. How many standard
    >>> households (and middle-of-the-road company's) can't survive without
    >>> the newest and latest (CS3) Photoshop. How many many standard
    >>> households (and middle-of-the-road company's) can even afford those
    >>> applications (without pirating - another thing in majority only
    >>> existing in windows-land).
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Sigh - of all stupid things...

    >>
    >> What might be considered stupid is to believe that every household is
    >> the same. Or that any are "standard," whatever that might mean in
    >> your dream -- today.
    >>
    >> I run AutoCAD, but I don't in any way believe that I can't use Linux.
    >> I use Linux for nearly everything, but if I should need to use
    >> AutoCAD, then I move over to a Windows box.
    >>
    >> Maybe your vision of a "standard household" only contains one
    >> computer? I don't know, but I evidentially don't even appear in your
    >> narrow view of computerdom, eh.
    >>
    >> What "they" do is not my concern, and shouldn't be a target of your
    >> observations either.
    >>

    >
    > Forgive me for using some ironic language in the reaction on Bruce
    > above, but in most cases when Windows is called absolutely unmissable
    > the "average" poster does refer to the "average Joe" as the one and
    > only "normal" user. I know - being a Linux user in a Linux group I
    > should never ever use the "average" or "normal" specifications
    > describing the people in my neighborhood. I deeply regret my
    > language... ;-).
    >
    > John.



    Thanks, John.

    Understood.

    I'm as far from "average" as anyone in this group. For instance, who
    else owns a Beowulf?


    --
    John

    No Microsoft, Apple, AT&T, Intel, Novell, Trend Micro, nor Ford products were used in the preparation or transmission of this message.

    The EULA sounds like it was written by a team of lawyers who want to tell me what I can't do. The GPL sounds like it was written by a human being, who wants me to know what I can do.

  9. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:10:32 -0500, Erik Funkenbusch wrote:

    > On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 19:56:14 -0600, snipe wrote:
    >
    >>> The truth is that Linux is a great server, but struggles as a dektop
    >>> due to lack of apps.

    >>
    >> What applications would that be? The only thing I can think of is
    >> games, but none of the computer-owning adults I know are into computer
    >> games.

    >
    > There are literally Millions of third party, vertical apps. Stuff
    > that's been written in-house in VB or stuff designed for a specific
    > market (Soil conservation, Agriculture, Water Treatment, Healthcare,
    > Business Intelligence, etc..).


    None of which are relevant to the majority of users, and the few who
    can't live without an application could just run it in a virtual
    machine. Chances are they had to pay for a Windows licence when they
    bought their computer anyway, so they might as well get a little use out
    of it.

  10. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:29:38 -0600, snipe wrote:


    > And many other Linux developers are of the opinion that we should have
    > nothing to do with Windows apps because accommodating them will blunt
    > efforts to create open-source alternatives. Many developers and users
    > are even openly hostile towards WINE.
    >
    > Personally, I don't care either way because I don't need any Windows
    > apps and if I did I'd just run them in a virtual machine. Autocad?
    > Photoshop? No problem at all.


    Great for you. Now go try to run Solidworks in a virtual machine and get
    back to me when you completely and utterly fail.

    --
    Stephan
    1986 Pontiac Fiero GT

    君の事思い出す日なんてないのは
    君の事忘れたときがないから

  11. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:41:57 -0600, snipe wrote:

    > On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:10:32 -0500, Erik Funkenbusch wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 19:56:14 -0600, snipe wrote:
    >>
    >>>> The truth is that Linux is a great server, but struggles as a dektop
    >>>> due to lack of apps.
    >>>
    >>> What applications would that be? The only thing I can think of is
    >>> games, but none of the computer-owning adults I know are into computer
    >>> games.

    >>
    >> There are literally Millions of third party, vertical apps. Stuff
    >> that's been written in-house in VB or stuff designed for a specific
    >> market (Soil conservation, Agriculture, Water Treatment, Healthcare,
    >> Business Intelligence, etc..).

    >
    > None of which are relevant to the majority of users, and the few who
    > can't live without an application could just run it in a virtual
    > machine (as long as it doesn't require 3D Acceleration). Chances are
    > they had to pay for a Windows licence when they
    > bought their computer anyway, so they might as well get a little use out
    > of it.


    Fixed the above paragraph for you.


    --
    Stephan
    1986 Pontiac Fiero GT

    君の事思い出す日なんてないのは
    君の事忘れたときがないから

  12. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    "snipe" stated in post
    4sqdndYTAf6I_5LUnZ2dnUVZ_u6dnZ2d@supernews.com on 11/3/08 1:41 PM:

    > On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:10:32 -0500, Erik Funkenbusch wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 19:56:14 -0600, snipe wrote:
    >>
    >>>> The truth is that Linux is a great server, but struggles as a dektop
    >>>> due to lack of apps.
    >>>
    >>> What applications would that be? The only thing I can think of is
    >>> games, but none of the computer-owning adults I know are into computer
    >>> games.

    >>
    >> There are literally Millions of third party, vertical apps. Stuff
    >> that's been written in-house in VB or stuff designed for a specific
    >> market (Soil conservation, Agriculture, Water Treatment, Healthcare,
    >> Business Intelligence, etc..).

    >
    > None of which are relevant to the majority of users, and the few who
    > can't live without an application could just run it in a virtual
    > machine. Chances are they had to pay for a Windows licence when they
    > bought their computer anyway, so they might as well get a little use out
    > of it.


    Apps I have used in the last 24 hours which have, as far as I know, no equal
    on Linux:

    * Dreamweaver
    * Photoshop
    * iWeb
    * Automator
    * even Mail, with its "QuickLook" feature - use it all the time
    * FileMaker Pro

    I also used programs where there are Linux programs that would work just
    fine for what I have done:
    * Web browsing - with both Firefox and a Webkit browser
    * RSS client - though what on Linux is as good as NetNewsWire?
    I assume their must be something.
    * iChat / Adium
    * iTunes. Nothing I have done with it could not be done in Linux
    just as well
    * TextWrangler
    * TextEdit
    * MS Word
    * Pages
    * Chicken of the VNC
    * Entourage
    * Preview

    But, of course, to get such a group of software you would inevitably end up
    with a mish-mash of UIs... and thus as a system it would not work as well as
    what I am using now (nor would it for most people with anything beyond
    simple needs).

    Linux is getting better on the desktop, but let us not pretend it is fully
    "ready" for the general desktop... not compared to the competition, anyway.



    --
    It usually takes me more than three weeks to prepare a good impromptu
    speech. -- Mark Twain


  13. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:46:45 -0600, Stephan Rose wrote:

    > On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:29:38 -0600, snipe wrote:
    >
    >
    >> And many other Linux developers are of the opinion that we should have
    >> nothing to do with Windows apps because accommodating them will blunt
    >> efforts to create open-source alternatives. Many developers and users
    >> are even openly hostile towards WINE.
    >>
    >> Personally, I don't care either way because I don't need any Windows
    >> apps and if I did I'd just run them in a virtual machine. Autocad?
    >> Photoshop? No problem at all.

    >
    > Great for you. Now go try to run Solidworks in a virtual machine and get
    > back to me when you completely and utterly fail.


    I don't need Solidworks, or any of the other niche applications that
    most people have never heard of and don't care about. But for what it's
    worth, we're only about a year from VM software that uses the host's
    video graphics acceleration from inside the guest. I don't remember for
    sure, but I think it was the KVM guys who were working on that.

  14. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:47:42 -0600, Stephan Rose wrote:

    > On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:41:57 -0600, snipe wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:10:32 -0500, Erik Funkenbusch wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 19:56:14 -0600, snipe wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> The truth is that Linux is a great server, but struggles as a dektop
    >>>>> due to lack of apps.
    >>>>
    >>>> What applications would that be? The only thing I can think of is
    >>>> games, but none of the computer-owning adults I know are into
    >>>> computer games.
    >>>
    >>> There are literally Millions of third party, vertical apps. Stuff
    >>> that's been written in-house in VB or stuff designed for a specific
    >>> market (Soil conservation, Agriculture, Water Treatment, Healthcare,
    >>> Business Intelligence, etc..).

    >>
    >> None of which are relevant to the majority of users, and the few who
    >> can't live without an application could just run it in a virtual
    >> machine (as long as it doesn't require 3D Acceleration). Chances are
    >> they had to pay for a Windows licence when they bought their computer
    >> anyway, so they might as well get a little use out of it.

    >
    > Fixed the above paragraph for you (and I'm sorry for being a moron)


    Thank you. I fixed yours, too.


  15. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 15:12:53 -0600, snipe wrote:

    > On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:46:45 -0600, Stephan Rose wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:29:38 -0600, snipe wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> And many other Linux developers are of the opinion that we should have
    >>> nothing to do with Windows apps because accommodating them will blunt
    >>> efforts to create open-source alternatives. Many developers and users
    >>> are even openly hostile towards WINE.
    >>>
    >>> Personally, I don't care either way because I don't need any Windows
    >>> apps and if I did I'd just run them in a virtual machine. Autocad?
    >>> Photoshop? No problem at all.

    >>
    >> Great for you. Now go try to run Solidworks in a virtual machine and
    >> get back to me when you completely and utterly fail.

    >
    > I don't need Solidworks, or any of the other niche applications that
    > most people have never heard of and don't care about. But for what it's
    > worth, we're only about a year from VM software that uses the host's
    > video graphics acceleration from inside the guest. I don't remember for
    > sure, but I think it was the KVM guys who were working on that.


    As if Autocad isn't a niche application that most people have never heard
    of and don't care about. While the chances of someone at least knowing
    the name Autocad might be higher than them knowing the name Solidworks,
    the chances of most people caring about either one are somewhere below
    none.

    That said, I hope you're right about the video graphics acceleration. If
    that really works out like that, I can stop wasting a whole drive for
    windows.

    --
    Stephan
    1986 Pontiac Fiero GT

    君の事思い出す日なんてないのは
    君の事忘れたときがないから

  16. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 15:18:43 -0600, snipe wrote:

    > On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:47:42 -0600, Stephan Rose wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:41:57 -0600, snipe wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:10:32 -0500, Erik Funkenbusch wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 19:56:14 -0600, snipe wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>> The truth is that Linux is a great server, but struggles as a
    >>>>>> dektop due to lack of apps.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> What applications would that be? The only thing I can think of is
    >>>>> games, but none of the computer-owning adults I know are into
    >>>>> computer games.
    >>>>
    >>>> There are literally Millions of third party, vertical apps. Stuff
    >>>> that's been written in-house in VB or stuff designed for a specific
    >>>> market (Soil conservation, Agriculture, Water Treatment, Healthcare,
    >>>> Business Intelligence, etc..).
    >>>
    >>> None of which are relevant to the majority of users, and the few who
    >>> can't live without an application could just run it in a virtual
    >>> machine (as long as it doesn't require 3D Acceleration). Chances are
    >>> they had to pay for a Windows licence when they bought their computer
    >>> anyway, so they might as well get a little use out of it.

    >>
    >> Fixed the above paragraph for you (and I'm sorry for being a moron)

    >
    > Thank you. I fixed yours, too.


    Your statement was only correct under the assumption that the app doesn't
    use any 3D acceleration. A lot of apps that do any kind of 3D
    visualization that go beyond a 3D bar char these days are very likely to
    use 3D acceleration.

    --
    Stephan
    1986 Pontiac Fiero GT

    君の事思い出す日なんてないのは
    君の事忘れたときがないから

  17. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:01:04 -0700, Snit wrote:

    The usual snit snot.

  18. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:41:57 -0600, snipe wrote:

    > On Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:10:32 -0500, Erik Funkenbusch wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 02 Nov 2008 19:56:14 -0600, snipe wrote:
    >>
    >>>> The truth is that Linux is a great server, but struggles as a dektop
    >>>> due to lack of apps.
    >>>
    >>> What applications would that be? The only thing I can think of is
    >>> games, but none of the computer-owning adults I know are into computer
    >>> games.

    >>
    >> There are literally Millions of third party, vertical apps. Stuff
    >> that's been written in-house in VB or stuff designed for a specific
    >> market (Soil conservation, Agriculture, Water Treatment, Healthcare,
    >> Business Intelligence, etc..).

    >
    > None of which are relevant to the majority of users


    Yes, they are. The part you don't get is that the majority of users are a
    member of *SOME* niche. You can't look at one niche and say "Oh, that's
    only 1% of the users", because if you add up all the niches, you end up
    with a vast majority of users.

    > and the few who can't live without an application could just run it in a
    > virtual machine.


    Why run two OS's when you can do everything you need in one?

  19. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    Erik Funkenbusch wrote:

    > What makes PowerShell inferior? Every comparison i've ever read has given
    > PowerShell high marks, even from Linux developers.


    It's just like Windoze - it's a bloated, ineffective, unstable mess and best
    avoided.




  20. Re: My employer completed migration of apps to Linux

    "snipe" stated in post
    T-2dneima5tB8ZLUnZ2dnUVZ_rHinZ2d@supernews.com on 11/3/08 2:27 PM:

    >>> None of which are relevant to the majority of users, and the few who
    >>> can't live without an application could just run it in a virtual
    >>> machine. Chances are they had to pay for a Windows licence when they
    >>> bought their computer anyway, so they might as well get a little use out
    >>> of it.

    >>
    >> Apps I have used in the last 24 hours which have, as far as I know, no equal
    >> on Linux:
    >>
    >> * Dreamweaver
    >> * Photoshop
    >> * iWeb
    >> * Automator
    >> * even Mail, with its "QuickLook" feature - use it all the time
    >> * FileMaker Pro
    >>
    >> I also used programs where there are Linux programs that would work just fine
    >> for what I have done:
    >> * Web browsing - with both Firefox and a Webkit browser
    >> * RSS client - though what on Linux is as good as NetNewsWire?
    >> I assume their must be something.
    >> * iChat / Adium
    >> * iTunes. Nothing I have done with it could not be done in Linux
    >> just as well
    >> * TextWrangler
    >> * TextEdit
    >> * MS Word
    >> * Pages
    >> * Chicken of the VNC
    >> * Entourage
    >> * Preview
    >>
    >> But, of course, to get such a group of software you would inevitably end up
    >> with a mish-mash of UIs... and thus as a system it would not work as well as
    >> what I am using now (nor would it for most people with anything beyond simple
    >> needs).
    >>
    >> Linux is getting better on the desktop, but let us not pretend it is fully
    >> "ready" for the general desktop... not compared to the competition, anyway.


    > The usual snit snot.


    Am I to assume you disagree? Disagree: but you are not able to say where
    you think I am wrong or why. OK. No harm done.


    --
    If A = B and B = C, then A = C, except where void or prohibited by law.
    Roy Santoro, Psycho Proverb Zone (http://snipurl.com/BurdenOfProof)






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