Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them? - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them? - Ubuntu ; In my home directory are a lot of hidden files, and even whole hidden directory trees. For some of them I can imagine the need to be there, however, it seems that most any program nowadays dumps a truckload of ...

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26

Thread: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

  1. Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?


    In my home directory are a lot of hidden files, and even whole hidden
    directory trees. For some of them I can imagine the need to be there,
    however, it seems that most any program nowadays dumps a truckload of
    files in the home directory.

    Is there are way that this can be minimized? At last count there where
    over 18000 files, for a total of 2.3 gigabytes. That's a bit rich, I think.

    Even Gnome itself seems very generous in generating all sort of crap on
    disk. Again, I understand some of them need to be there (settings,
    themes) but surely there is no need for all this bloat?

    Any thought how to manage this?

    Bob

  2. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On 2008-10-28, Bob wrote:
    >
    > In my home directory are a lot of hidden files, and even whole hidden
    > directory trees. For some of them I can imagine the need to be there,
    > however, it seems that most any program nowadays dumps a truckload of
    > files in the home directory.
    >
    > Is there are way that this can be minimized? At last count there where
    > over 18000 files, for a total of 2.3 gigabytes. That's a bit rich, I think.
    >
    > Even Gnome itself seems very generous in generating all sort of crap on
    > disk. Again, I understand some of them need to be there (settings,
    > themes) but surely there is no need for all this bloat?
    >
    > Any thought how to manage this?


    Most of those files will be tiny and inconsequential.
    I would use FileLight to find out where the space is being used.
    (If I had to guess: thumbnails)
    Once you know what the big files are, you can make a more informed
    decision on what to do with them.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filelight

    --
    -Toby
    Add the word afiduluminag to the subject to circumvent my email filters.

  3. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 14:00:01 +0000, Toby Newman wrote:

    > Most of those files will be tiny and inconsequential. I would use
    > FileLight to find out where the space is being used. (If I had to guess:
    > thumbnails)
    > Once you know what the big files are, you can make a more informed
    > decision on what to do with them.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filelight


    Or if you don't want to see pictures, try

    du | sort -n

    The bottom of the output will be the big files and folders.


  4. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    In article ,
    Toby Newman wrote:
    > On 2008-10-28, Bob wrote:
    > >
    > > In my home directory are a lot of hidden files, and even whole hidden
    > > directory trees. For some of them I can imagine the need to be there,
    > > however, it seems that most any program nowadays dumps a truckload of
    > > files in the home directory.
    > >
    > > Is there are way that this can be minimized? At last count there where
    > > over 18000 files, for a total of 2.3 gigabytes. That's a bit rich, I think.
    > >
    > > Even Gnome itself seems very generous in generating all sort of crap on
    > > disk. Again, I understand some of them need to be there (settings,
    > > themes) but surely there is no need for all this bloat?
    > >
    > > Any thought how to manage this?

    >
    > Most of those files will be tiny and inconsequential.
    > I would use FileLight to find out where the space is being used.
    > (If I had to guess: thumbnails)
    > Once you know what the big files are, you can make a more informed
    > decision on what to do with them.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filelight


    A script I wrote, ddu, can show you their (sorted) sizes.

    http://royalty.mine.nu:81/cgi-bin/ge...rt%2Fbin%2Fddu

    eben@pc:~$ ddu -h .[^.]* # I think that'll get most of them except for
    # pathologic cases
    [161 items not shown]
    62M .pan
    78M .thumbnails
    108M .mozilla
    136M .gimv
    eben@pc:~$

    --
    -eben QebWenE01R@vTerYizUonI.nOetP royalty.mine.nu:81

    Unix is user-friendly; it's just picky
    about who it makes friends with.

  5. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On October 28, 2008 10:10, in alt.os.linux.ubuntu, jellybean stonerfish
    (stonerfish@geocities.com) wrote:

    > On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 14:00:01 +0000, Toby Newman wrote:
    >
    >> Most of those files will be tiny and inconsequential. I would use
    >> FileLight to find out where the space is being used. (If I had to guess:
    >> thumbnails)
    >> Once you know what the big files are, you can make a more informed
    >> decision on what to do with them.
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filelight

    >
    > Or if you don't want to see pictures, try
    >
    > du | sort -n
    >
    > The bottom of the output will be the big files and folders.


    Good advice.

    Alternatively,
    du | sort -nr
    will put the biggest files and folders at the top of the list, and
    du | sort -nr | head -10
    will report the ten biggest files/folders


    --
    Lew Pitcher

    Master Codewright & JOAT-in-training | Registered Linux User #112576
    http://pitcher.digitalfreehold.ca/ | GPG public key available by request
    ---------- Slackware - Because I know what I'm doing. ------



  6. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 10:58:37 -0400, Lew Pitcher wrote:


    >
    > Alternatively,
    > du | sort -nr
    > will put the biggest files and folders at the top of the list, and
    > du | sort -nr | head -10
    > will report the ten biggest files/folders


    I rather like the 'disc usage analyser' under accessories. The graphical
    output rapidly shows where space is being taken, and the % values enable
    some quantification.

    Keith

  7. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    Bob wrote:

    > In my home directory are a lot of hidden files, and even whole hidden
    > directory trees. For some of them I can imagine the need to be there,
    > however, it seems that most any program nowadays dumps a truckload of
    > files in the home directory.
    >
    > Is there are way that this can be minimized? At last count there where
    > over 18000 files, for a total of 2.3 gigabytes. That's a bit rich, I
    > think.
    >
    > Even Gnome itself seems very generous in generating all sort of crap
    > on disk. Again, I understand some of them need to be there (settings,
    > themes) but surely there is no need for all this bloat?
    >
    > Any thought how to manage this?


    Find out which the big files/directories are and if you really need
    them.

    Often browser caches or databases for desktop search engines use a lot
    of space.



    Florian
    --

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    ** Hi! I'm a signature virus! Copy me into your signature, please! **
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

  8. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 17:03:13 +0100, Florian Diesch wrote:
    >Bob wrote:


    >> In my home directory are a lot of hidden files, and even whole hidden
    >> directory trees. For some of them I can imagine the need to be there,
    >> however, it seems that most any program nowadays dumps a truckload of
    >> files in the home directory.
    >>
    >> Is there are way that this can be minimized? At last count there where
    >> over 18000 files, for a total of 2.3 gigabytes. That's a bit rich, I
    >> think.
    >>
    >> Even Gnome itself seems very generous in generating all sort of crap
    >> on disk. Again, I understand some of them need to be there (settings,
    >> themes) but surely there is no need for all this bloat?
    >>
    >> Any thought how to manage this?


    >Find out which the big files/directories are and if you really need
    >them.


    >Often browser caches or databases for desktop search engines use a lot
    >of space.


    User data including email is stored there as well. On my system, 99% of
    the space used in the .x files is my kmail account.


  9. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    keith wrote:
    > I rather like the 'disc usage analyser' under accessories. The graphical
    > output rapidly shows where space is being taken, and the % values enable
    > some quantification.


    Good advice from everyone. Seems the diskspace was being used almost
    completely in the .cache and .thumbnails directory. I've removed them
    (after renaming them and seeing nothing breaks) and now diskspace isn't
    an issue anymore.

    However, the numbers of .x files in my homedir is still huge, even if
    they are all small files.

    I think it would be much better if all the programs that need to save
    some settings would do this in ~/.config/ or somesuch. Not in the
    homedir itself.

    Or I need to stop doing "ls -al", and be blissfully unaware of the
    mess... :-)

    Bob

  10. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    Florian Diesch wrote:
    > Find out which the big files/directories are and if you really need
    > them.
    >
    > Often browser caches or databases for desktop search engines use a lot
    > of space.


    True. I found most of the diskspace was in two directories that could be
    emptied without bad results.

    However, if at all possible I would like to get rid of all the .x
    files/directories that are created by all sorts of applications. Perhaps
    by putting them in a special .config dir or some such.

    Obviously creating a symlink from ~ to ~/.config isn't going to work
    very well... :-)

    Bob

  11. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 17:44:23 +0100, Max wrote:

    [...]

    > However, the numbers of .x files in my homedir is still huge, even if
    > they are all small files.
    >
    > I think it would be much better if all the programs that need to save
    > some settings would do this in ~/.config/ or somesuch. Not in the
    > homedir itself.


    Hey, here's a neat idea: we could organise it that all configuration
    settings and temporary data are stored in a massive binary blob, along
    with all system configs and the configs of all other users of the
    system ;-)

    > Or I need to stop doing "ls -al", and be blissfully unaware of the
    > mess... :-)


    .... as you would be if they were all in ~/.config/ or somesuch.

    --
    Lionel B

  12. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    Max schreef:
    > Florian Diesch wrote:
    >> Find out which the big files/directories are and if you really need
    >> them.
    >>
    >> Often browser caches or databases for desktop search engines use a lot
    >> of space.

    >
    > True. I found most of the diskspace was in two directories that could be
    > emptied without bad results.
    >
    > However, if at all possible I would like to get rid of all the .x
    > files/directories that are created by all sorts of applications. Perhaps
    > by putting them in a special .config dir or some such.
    >
    > Obviously creating a symlink from ~ to ~/.config isn't going to work
    > very well... :-)
    >
    > Bob

    They are already in a special place, it's a directory or file with the
    name .*
    You (your applications) need these configuration files and as they are
    different for all users the logic is to store them in the users own
    directory.
    Personally I don't care where they are, when I need (to edit) them I
    just enable 'View hidden files'.

    As you found out the biggest space hogs are thumbnails, programs that
    generate and use them can usually be told not to.

  13. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    Lionel B wrote:
    >
    > Hey, here's a neat idea: we could organise it that all configuration
    > settings and temporary data are stored in a massive binary blob, along
    > with all system configs and the configs of all other users of the
    > system ;-)


    I'm not really advocating to recreate the registry abomination of that
    other OS, I just don't think all those programs need to store so many
    settings. Or, just write those setting when *I* change something, and
    don't write the default settings.

    Bob


  14. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    Dirk T. Verbeek wrote:
    >
    > As you found out the biggest space hogs are thumbnails, programs that
    > generate and use them can usually be told not to.


    I've set it up now that all unnecessary settings, configs and caches are
    removed at logout. That'll teach them! :-)

    Bob

  15. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 14:00:01 +0000, Toby Newman wrote:

    > On 2008-10-28, Bob wrote:
    >>
    >> In my home directory are a lot of hidden files, and even whole hidden
    >> directory trees. For some of them I can imagine the need to be there,
    >> however, it seems that most any program nowadays dumps a truckload of
    >> files in the home directory.
    >>
    >> Is there are way that this can be minimized? At last count there where
    >> over 18000 files, for a total of 2.3 gigabytes. That's a bit rich, I think.
    >>
    >> Even Gnome itself seems very generous in generating all sort of crap on
    >> disk. Again, I understand some of them need to be there (settings,
    >> themes) but surely there is no need for all this bloat?
    >>
    >> Any thought how to manage this?

    >
    > Most of those files will be tiny and inconsequential.
    > I would use FileLight to find out where the space is being used.
    > (If I had to guess: thumbnails)
    > Once you know what the big files are, you can make a more informed
    > decision on what to do with them.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filelight


    Find really big files/directories: (1G or larger):

    $ du . -h|grep [0-9]G[[:space:]]|sort -gr|more

    Sort files/directories by size:

    $ du . |sort -gr|more
    --
    MarkA
    Keeper of Things Put There Only Just The Night Before
    About eight o'clock


  16. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 10:26:42 -0500, keith wrote:

    > On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 10:58:37 -0400, Lew Pitcher wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >> Alternatively,
    >> du | sort -nr
    >> will put the biggest files and folders at the top of the list, and
    >> du | sort -nr | head -10
    >> will report the ten biggest files/folders

    >
    > I rather like the 'disc usage analyser' under accessories. The
    > graphical output rapidly shows where space is being taken, and the %
    > values enable some quantification.
    >
    > Keith


    Yeah that is pretty, I didn't even know it was there.


  17. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    Max wrote:


    > However, the numbers of .x files in my homedir is still huge, even if
    > they are all small files.


    Best tell Mulder and Scully...

    --
    http://www.petezilla.co.uk

  18. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    Peter Chant wrote:
    > Best tell Mulder and Scully...


    Damn, I miss that show.

    --
    As we enjoy great advantages from inventions of others, we should be
    glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
    and this we should do freely and generously.
    --Benjamin Franklin

  19. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    jellybean stonerfish wrote:
    > On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 14:00:01 +0000, Toby Newman wrote:
    >
    >> Most of those files will be tiny and inconsequential. I would use
    >> FileLight to find out where the space is being used. (If I had to guess:
    >> thumbnails)
    >> Once you know what the big files are, you can make a more informed
    >> decision on what to do with them.
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filelight

    >
    > Or if you don't want to see pictures, try
    >
    > du | sort -n
    >
    > The bottom of the output will be the big files and folders.
    >


    I usually do "du -s . | sort -n", then recurse into the bottom directories.

    --
    These are my personal views and not those of Fujitsu Siemens Computers!
    Josef Möllers (Pinguinpfleger bei FSC)
    If failure had no penalty success would not be a prize (T. Pratchett)
    Company Details: http://www.fujitsu-siemens.com/imprint.html

  20. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 18:43:40 +0100, Bob wrote:

    > Lionel B wrote:
    >>
    >> Hey, here's a neat idea: we could organise it that all configuration
    >> settings and temporary data are stored in a massive binary blob, along
    >> with all system configs and the configs of all other users of the
    >> system ;-)

    >
    > I'm not really advocating to recreate the registry abomination of that
    > other OS,


    Sure, it was a joke.

    > I just don't think all those programs need to store so many settings.


    Who's to say? It's surely down to the authors of an app how much
    configuration flexibility they choose to allow the user.

    > Or, just write those setting when *I* change something, and
    > don't write the default settings.


    Many apps do exactly that: default settings are stored in config files
    (probably somewhere in /etc or /usr/share) while per-user settings -
    which override default settings - are stored in ~/.whatever.

    Per-user *data* (including "temporary" or "variable" data such as
    caches), on the other hand, really should go in ~

    But I don't see it as a big deal. If you don't want to see'em, don't
    look. That's what the .* mechanism is for.

    --
    Lionel B

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast