Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them? - Ubuntu

This is a discussion on Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them? - Ubuntu ; On 2008-10-28, Lionel B wrote: > On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 17:44:23 +0100, Max wrote: > > [...] > >> However, the numbers of .x files in my homedir is still huge, even if >> they are all small files. ...

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Thread: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

  1. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On 2008-10-28, Lionel B wrote:
    > On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 17:44:23 +0100, Max wrote:
    >
    > [...]
    >
    >> However, the numbers of .x files in my homedir is still huge, even if
    >> they are all small files.
    >>
    >> I think it would be much better if all the programs that need to save
    >> some settings would do this in ~/.config/ or somesuch. Not in the
    >> homedir itself.

    >
    > Hey, here's a neat idea: we could organise it that all configuration
    > settings and temporary data are stored in a massive binary blob, along
    > with all system configs and the configs of all other users of the
    > system ;-)
    >
    >> Or I need to stop doing "ls -al", and be blissfully unaware of the
    >> mess... :-)

    >
    > ... as you would be if they were all in ~/.config/ or somesuch.


    I'm with Max here - The .foo files are no problem when I'm in Linux,
    but I like Windows to show hidden files and when I browse my home over
    Samba it's a mess of hidden directories.

    I don't see any reason why they couldn't be kept in ~/config, in much
    the same way KDE tidies all its files into ~/.kde.

    --
    -Toby
    Add the word afiduluminag to the subject to circumvent my email filters.

  2. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On Wed, 29 Oct 2008 14:00:01 +0000, Toby Newman wrote:

    > On 2008-10-28, Lionel B wrote:
    >> On Tue, 28 Oct 2008 17:44:23 +0100, Max wrote:
    >>
    >> [...]
    >>
    >>> However, the numbers of .x files in my homedir is still huge, even if
    >>> they are all small files.
    >>>
    >>> I think it would be much better if all the programs that need to save
    >>> some settings would do this in ~/.config/ or somesuch. Not in the
    >>> homedir itself.

    >>
    >> Hey, here's a neat idea: we could organise it that all configuration
    >> settings and temporary data are stored in a massive binary blob, along
    >> with all system configs and the configs of all other users of the
    >> system ;-)
    >>
    >>> Or I need to stop doing "ls -al", and be blissfully unaware of the
    >>> mess... :-)

    >>
    >> ... as you would be if they were all in ~/.config/ or somesuch.

    >
    > I'm with Max here - The .foo files are no problem when I'm in Linux, but
    > I like Windows to show hidden files


    Well Don't Do That Then (tm).

    > and when I browse my home over Samba it's a mess of hidden directories.
    >
    > I don't see any reason why they couldn't be kept in ~/config, in much
    > the same way KDE tidies all its files into ~/.kde.


    I suspect the reasons are probably historic and because nobody thought it
    important enough to bother about (over more than a decade of following
    *nix newsgroups/forums I think I can honestly say this is the first time
    I've ever seen this complaint). It's not going to happen.

    Cheers,

    --
    Lionel B

  3. [OT] X-Files (was Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?)

    * johnny bobby bee wrote in alt.os.linux.ubuntu:

    > Peter Chant wrote:
    >> Best tell Mulder and Scully...

    >
    > Damn, I miss that show.
    >


    Do you watch Fringe? Its the closest thing lately.

    --
    David

  4. Re: [OT] X-Files (was Re: Hidden files in home directory, how toget rid of most of them?)

    SINNER wrote:
    > Do you watch Fringe? Its the closest thing lately.


    Actually I have been. At first I thought it was a rip-off of x-files,
    now I'm quite enjoying it.

    --
    As we enjoy great advantages from inventions of others, we should be
    glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours;
    and this we should do freely and generously.
    --Benjamin Franklin

  5. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    Toby Newman wrote:


    > I'm with Max here - The .foo files are no problem when I'm in Linux,
    > but I like Windows to show hidden files and when I browse my home over
    > Samba it's a mess of hidden directories.


    That is fixable in smb.conf, in Slackware its in /etc/samba/smb.conf. I've
    done it before, but I did not get around to setting it up in my current
    config.

    Look in man smb.conf and look for "hide dot files".

    Pete

    --
    http://www.petezilla.co.uk

  6. Re: Hidden files in home directory, how to get rid of most of them?

    On Wed, 29 Oct 2008 14:00:01 +0000, Toby Newman wrote:
    > I'm with Max here - The .foo files are no problem when I'm in Linux,
    > but I like Windows to show hidden files and when I browse my home over
    > Samba it's a mess of hidden directories.
    >
    > I don't see any reason why they couldn't be kept in ~/config, in much
    > the same way KDE tidies all its files into ~/.kde.


    Even some native Linux GUI programs I've used had poorly designed file
    dialogs that insist on showing everything without giving an option to
    hide hidden files. I agree that it would be nice to be able to put them
    somewhere else, but I don't see any practical way to change it now. But
    I have better things to complain about; it's not /that/ big of a deal
    for me. But then again, I originally came from Windows 9x where
    things were stored in just about any conceivable place at the descretion
    of every individual software developer. Yuck! Talk about making
    data/config-only backups impractical.

    --
    Travis Evans
    [Obtain email address by removing all Q's.]

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